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View Poll Results: Do You Practice Gender Neutral Parenting (Select all that Apply)
Yes, I Practice Gender Neutral Parenting 8 11.27%
No, I do Not Practice Gender Neutral Parenting 21 29.58%
Yes, I Practice Gender Neutral Parenting - My Children are All Boys 0 0%
No, I do Not Practice Gender Neutral Parenting - My Children are All Boys 10 14.08%
Yes, I Practice Gender Neutral Parenting - My Children are All Girls 6 8.45%
No, I do Not Practice Gender Neutral Parenting - My Children are All Girls 7 9.86%
Yes, I Practice Gender Neutral Parenting - My Children are Both Boys and Girls 5 7.04%
No, I do Not Practice Gender Neutral Parenting - My Children are Both Boys and Girls 22 30.99%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 71. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-22-2016, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
15,370 posts, read 25,567,363 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kibbiekat View Post
What does that even mean? What if you happened to have a boy that wanted a play kitchen, or wanted his ears pierced, or a girl who wanted to play with trucks or dinosaurs? I'm not saying we need to force opposite gender rolls on kids, but not keep them hidden either.
It means that boys and girls are different.

Play kitchen? heck all my kids spent time in the kitchen learning to cook. Funny thing is that our daughter wanted to do it at a much earlier age. At nine she can do a lot in the kitchen as she took an early interest in it. None of the boys ever asked to have a toy kitchen but our daughter wanted one. She still has it. None of our sons have their ears pierced. Not something that we would have supported but not something that any of them ever asked for. Our daughter had hers pierced when she was maybe 1 or so. We have told our kid that we expect certain things out of them. We teach them right and wrong and hope that they will live the way that we teach them. If they choose another path then we have told them that they can follow their own rules when they are living in their own home. As long as we are paying the bills they will live by our rules. Short hair for boys, long hair for girls.
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Old 02-22-2016, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Warren, OH
2,704 posts, read 3,130,944 times
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Couldn't answer. Some kids are more "gender hard wired" than others. I took my cues from them.

I have 2 boys and a girl.

My wife wanted to do this (older son from an ex-wife) we gave him a doll and he wasn't interested. He turned it into a projectile missile.

He was amazingly interested in art. We supported that. He is quite talented.
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Old 02-22-2016, 01:45 PM
 
Location: The point of no return, er, NorCal
6,894 posts, read 4,221,404 times
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In many ways, yes. My older two, girls, were never into stereotypical "girl" things. I adored barbies and dolls growing up, and played with them for many years. I used to buy them a variety of dolls and barbies, but they had little interest. They had more interest in blocks and Legos. They showed some interest in My Little Pony and Littlest Pet Shop, but it was a phase. They're mostly into comic books, anime, video games, fantasy/sci-fi movies and novels, and my 9 year old loves science-centered things -- kits and experiments. She likes collecting things she finds outside. They loved cars and trucks as toddlers and preschoolers.

And, unlike my childhood extracurricular activities that revolved around dance for 13 years, they have absolutely no interest in any of it. They, along with their brother, train in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. They're also into art classes. Both are really talented at drawing. My 11 year old is more "girly" than my 9 year old, but not in the classic sense with an intense love for pink and princess-y things. While they have enjoyed Disney movies of old and new, they have never been Disney princess types. They've never asked to be a princess for, say, Halloween. My 9 year old was Harry Potter for Halloween this past year (11 year old went as Hermione). My 9 year old hates dresses.

With my son, he plays with all sorts of toys, and has worn his sisters' old clothes. He has longer (neck length) hair, and I've painted his nails many times. He's very nurturing to his baby sister and likes to help around the house when he's in the mood. When my youngest was a baby, he used to mimic me breastfeeding her, and he has a kid baby wrap to put dolls in it.

And with my youngest, she's still young, 15 months, so her interest in things is still in the early stages of development. But she's in a diverse environment that is gender neutral with respect to play, interests/hobbies and attire. She has a lot of "boy" clothes. Some of my favorite pieces she has are "boy" clothes. I tend to prefer gender neutral and less frilly/cutesy clothes. I never did bows with any of my kids. Especially those giant bows. Just... not my thing. We often get the "Oh, he's pretty." when she's in something non-pink or "girly," which is most of the time. One of the pairs of shoes she wears is light blue, and the other a rust-light brown color. Pairing these with non "girly" clothes almost always garners comments that "he's" so cute. It's no big deal that people think she's dressed like a "boy" sometimes.

My MIL likes buying them dresses... that they don't wear. She'll also make comments like "little princess." For Christmas, one of the "big" gifts we got our youngest daughter is a castle tent with small foam swords. She loves it, and adores the swords, and makes sword sound effects (and loves our lightsabers). My MIL made a passive-aggressive comment about it then. *sigh* My husband said it's odd because he doesn't remember her being this way with his sister. When she visited last week she said something about her princess, while dd3 was playing with her sword, and my husband responded that she's a warrior. She replied back with "warrior princess."
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Old 02-22-2016, 02:28 PM
 
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Not gender neutral, however our girls are way more 'girly' than what we expected.
Wife and I are not very passionate about our looks and wardrobe, however the girls were very firm in their fashion choices from before they could even walk.
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Old 02-22-2016, 03:45 PM
 
10,090 posts, read 6,489,790 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oronzous View Post
Not gender neutral, however our girls are way more 'girly' than what we expected.
Wife and I are not very passionate about our looks and wardrobe, however the girls were very firm in their fashion choices from before they could even walk.
My daughter has been very set in her own style from a very early age too. It isn't distinctly "girly". It's an interesting mix of things...she always has a signature style going on. My son could still care less what he wears as long as it's comfortable. My older boys were like that too.
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Old 02-22-2016, 04:30 PM
 
Location: North America
14,212 posts, read 9,611,695 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFlyingBird View Post
So I will take a stab at it.

Yes and No.

When they were babies, I dressed them for their gender. I shopped in the boys department for my son, and girls for my daughter. I am not super "girly" so the clothes I chose for my daughter were often a bit on the neutral side. Most baby toys are somewhat neutral...like floor play matts and the like and I chose neutral types of items knowing we planned to adopt again soon.

When it came to toys for them when they were older, I let them choose for themselves, but I also got my kids things that used to be meant for the other gender (dolls, kitchen, etc) Being that we did lots of play groups, I was able to see the toys they liked before buying them, both "boys" and "girls" toys. I am sure they didn't know any toys were meant for a specific gender.

My boy was "all boy" in his choices. Trains, trucks, dinosaurs. And then my daughter (a year younger) played with the things my son did until she was about 4. She very suddenly because super obsessed with all things girly. And this has pretty much stayed like this for the past 5 years. But she still plays with toys with her brother, likes "boy shows" (my son likes "girl shows" too). She has pretty much always had her own style, which does consist of several "girly" items but has a bit of a tom boy twist to it. She also has no interest in dressing up like a princess, wearing tutus, hair bows, having her hair done. My son doesn't dress in girl clothes at all...but he does own and wear a pair of purple pants and wears them without shame (although usually when his other pants are dirty).

At 9 and 10, they seem to conform to their gender rolls. My son plays soccer with the boys at recess. My daughter plays imagination games with the girls at recess. But they both have no shame in liking something that used to be for the other gender. In fact, my son's hair got out of control long, and my daughter hasn't been taking care of her hair. I was joking around with them and said we would grow my son's hair out long and he could have girl hair and we could cut my daughter's hair short and she could have boy hair. I quickly got a very serious lecture that there is no "boys hair" or "girls hair". My son, especially, feels strongly about this topic.

So I guess, the answer is Yes, overall. But I still raised them allowing them to express themselves, play with what they liked, and be who they are without silly rules enforcing a consistent "gender neutrality" lifestyle. I have known people who have done that. I think its way over board.
They told you, Mom.
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Old 02-22-2016, 04:44 PM
 
10,090 posts, read 6,489,790 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ~HecateWhisperCat~ View Post
They told you, Mom.
LOL its always good for a chuckle when I get a lecture from them on something i taught them. But at least I know its sinking in.
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Old 02-23-2016, 12:57 PM
 
489 posts, read 324,268 times
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No, and haven't seen a reason to do so.
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Old 02-24-2016, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,126,539 times
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Nope, I always encouraged them to embrace their gender.
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Old 02-24-2016, 07:19 PM
 
1,891 posts, read 1,132,399 times
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I raise my kids "gender sensitive". I don't restrict or force things like clothes, toys, hobbies, favorite subjects on school, based on gender. But I am always sensitive to the needs of their particular gender and take it into account in how I parent each of them. I teach them biological differences. I teach them what may get them made fun of, while also stressing it's okay to like whatever, just know that other kids may be mean about it because they may view it as a girl thing or a boy thing. I try to be truthful with them about how reality works, while also encouraging them to form their own opinions and think for themselves.
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