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View Poll Results: Do You Practice Gender Neutral Parenting (Select all that Apply)
Yes, I Practice Gender Neutral Parenting 8 11.27%
No, I do Not Practice Gender Neutral Parenting 21 29.58%
Yes, I Practice Gender Neutral Parenting - My Children are All Boys 0 0%
No, I do Not Practice Gender Neutral Parenting - My Children are All Boys 10 14.08%
Yes, I Practice Gender Neutral Parenting - My Children are All Girls 6 8.45%
No, I do Not Practice Gender Neutral Parenting - My Children are All Girls 7 9.86%
Yes, I Practice Gender Neutral Parenting - My Children are Both Boys and Girls 5 7.04%
No, I do Not Practice Gender Neutral Parenting - My Children are Both Boys and Girls 22 30.99%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 71. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-21-2016, 09:46 AM
 
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Do you practice gender neutral parenting?
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Old 02-21-2016, 10:25 AM
 
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Poll is incomplete.

I tried to be gender neutral but wasn't always.

Also, Yes I practice gender neutral parenting and then having all three options for gender of children is redundant.
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Old 02-21-2016, 11:17 AM
 
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What exactly does "gender neutral" mean?
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Old 02-21-2016, 11:45 AM
 
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yes in a way. I have both kinds of genders and we've always encouraged them to explore whatever they want to explore, play with whatever toys they want to, etc. If that's what you mean by gender neutral, yes.
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Old 02-21-2016, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Finland
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Depends what you mean by gender neutral. I've always encouraged my daughter to play with anything and told her there's no such thing as boys or girls toys or colours, worked with toys but she still thinks some colours are girl's colours and others are boy's colours. She was dressed gender neutrally mostly as a baby as most of her clothes came from the baby box which is all gender neutral anyway and she has a mix nowadays, loves pink and dresses and also loves 'boyish' caps and hats. I was a tomboy as a kid so I guess I wanted to push a lot more of the 'boyish' stuff rather than actually be gender neutral but she has her own opinions now at 5 and that's that.
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Old 02-21-2016, 01:08 PM
 
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So I will take a stab at it.

Yes and No.

When they were babies, I dressed them for their gender. I shopped in the boys department for my son, and girls for my daughter. I am not super "girly" so the clothes I chose for my daughter were often a bit on the neutral side. Most baby toys are somewhat neutral...like floor play matts and the like and I chose neutral types of items knowing we planned to adopt again soon.

When it came to toys for them when they were older, I let them choose for themselves, but I also got my kids things that used to be meant for the other gender (dolls, kitchen, etc) Being that we did lots of play groups, I was able to see the toys they liked before buying them, both "boys" and "girls" toys. I am sure they didn't know any toys were meant for a specific gender.

My boy was "all boy" in his choices. Trains, trucks, dinosaurs. And then my daughter (a year younger) played with the things my son did until she was about 4. She very suddenly because super obsessed with all things girly. And this has pretty much stayed like this for the past 5 years. But she still plays with toys with her brother, likes "boy shows" (my son likes "girl shows" too). She has pretty much always had her own style, which does consist of several "girly" items but has a bit of a tom boy twist to it. She also has no interest in dressing up like a princess, wearing tutus, hair bows, having her hair done. My son doesn't dress in girl clothes at all...but he does own and wear a pair of purple pants and wears them without shame (although usually when his other pants are dirty).

At 9 and 10, they seem to conform to their gender rolls. My son plays soccer with the boys at recess. My daughter plays imagination games with the girls at recess. But they both have no shame in liking something that used to be for the other gender. In fact, my son's hair got out of control long, and my daughter hasn't been taking care of her hair. I was joking around with them and said we would grow my son's hair out long and he could have girl hair and we could cut my daughter's hair short and she could have boy hair. I quickly got a very serious lecture that there is no "boys hair" or "girls hair". My son, especially, feels strongly about this topic.

So I guess, the answer is Yes, overall. But I still raised them allowing them to express themselves, play with what they liked, and be who they are without silly rules enforcing a consistent "gender neutrality" lifestyle. I have known people who have done that. I think its way over board.
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Old 02-21-2016, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Texas
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If GN means letting kids decide, then yes. If it means forcing everything they do be gender neutral or having them do things just because it is opposite of a gender stereotype, then no.
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Old 02-21-2016, 02:10 PM
 
Location: I am right here.
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My kids are all grown now. When they were kids, I offered a wide variety of toys. The doll ended up being shoved to the bottom of the toy box. It was never played with, as I recall, except as a tool used to destroy block towers. The toy kitchen was well used. They loved trucks and engines. The all had favorite stuffed animals. Blocks, Legos, and K'nex were hugely popular toys. They loved their super soakers and airsoft guns. Bow and arrow were popular. Skates were hugely popular and well used. All do have some peach/salmon/pink colored shirts in their wardrobes. One loved to paint and color and draw. The others did not.

The books they chose to read were primarily action, science fiction, and fantasy. Hardy Boys (including the originals - my MIL saved them!). Harry Potter. Gary Paulson books. Eragon series. Redwall series. Among others....they still prefer to read fantasy and science fiction as adults. All are voracious readers.

I never forced them to play with things they did not want to play with. I simply provided choices.
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Old 02-21-2016, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Texas
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I think this is an interesting thread. Curious what responses it gets as it progresses.

I have 2 girls- ages 8 and 5. I have always tried to provide a mix of toys and sometimes go out of my way to avoid gender specific colors and toys/activities. It bugs me when things are made to be gender specific unnecessarily, like toys in fast food restaurant meals. That said, for the past several years, I have just taken my cues from them. My oldest is an almost 50/50 balance in her likes and interests, but my youngest daughter is very much a girly girl. My oldest wanted lots of dragon stuff for Christmas, my youngest wanted Princess dress up stuff. I didn't prompt these suggestions, they were driven by them.

I'm not sure, though, how I would change or modify my parenting if one of my girls gravitated too far towards opposite gender interests. As a child, I was a tomboy to the extreme, even through Middle School. I was mistaken for a boy on more than one occasion, which made for some really difficult years for a while. I think I would probably be hypersensitive to this if one of my daughters was similar to me at that age, which would present an interesting parenting dilemma, but I don't see that happening.

Last edited by Texas Ag 93; 02-21-2016 at 04:17 PM..
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Old 02-21-2016, 05:18 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
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I let my kids decide. Both are girls and both seem to like girly things, except that my 13 year old wears mens t-shirts a lot. My 10 year old cooks, but not because that's something girls are supposed to do...she cooks because she loves food. They both play with dolls, read science fiction and play video games. My older daughter likes to target shoot and my younger one likes to learn how to fix things around the house.

I would say I'm fairly gender-neutral myself. I do the things women are traditionally supposed to do...stay home to raise the kids, cook, clean, sew, etc. but I also do the things that men are traditionally supposed to do around the house...yardwork, auto repairs, plumbing, appliance repairs, stuff like that. I care more about getting things done than I care about who's supposed to be able to do them. And I hope that will be a good example for my kids.
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