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Old 03-16-2016, 12:29 AM
 
Location: Michigan
1,797 posts, read 1,163,350 times
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When my son was 3, he had the same problem. I cured it overnight by making up some "anti-GHOST" spray in a bottle. IE: Dish soap and water.


Whenever he thought the ghosts were ready to come out and get him, he'd spray the soapy bubbles at them, and they'd immediately go away!


lol, Hey, it worked for him!
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Old 03-16-2016, 06:16 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,183 posts, read 3,677,416 times
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If your child thinks there is a monster in the closet, what about installing a light in the closet and keep the door semi-closed so it isn't too bright in the room?
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Old 03-16-2016, 06:25 AM
 
Location: Texas
42,315 posts, read 49,965,724 times
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Small nightlight?

Also good bc they are just learning to get out of bed themselves to go pee or find you or get water or whatever.

Did he ever tell you why he thinks there's a monster?
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Old 03-16-2016, 07:07 AM
 
11,702 posts, read 13,141,323 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mythbusters117 View Post
So my kid is three years old and seemingly overnight he's become afraid of the dark. He's convinced that something lives his closet. I've done some research, both on this site and a few others, and I feel a little more comforted that it seems to be a normal thing....Is this something that he simply needs to outgrow or does anyone here have any suggestions of something I can try? If your kid acted the same way, at what age did he or she outgrow it?
I was afraid of the dark as a child, and was certain that there were monsters lurking in the room. My mother would leave a very small lamp on. My parent's reassurances that nothing was wrong and that there were no scary monsters lurking was not something I found easy to believe, and as soon as they left the room I believed them not at all!

Sometime in early primary school the fear vanished and that was that.
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Old 03-16-2016, 07:31 AM
 
10,090 posts, read 6,530,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CSD610 View Post
How is this not reinforcing the notion as well? If you tell a child there are no monsters then give them a flashlight *just in case* you have not made anything better or alleviated their fears.
Offering them light isn't for "just in case" its so they can alleviate their fears when they do pop up. Eventually, with enough time, the lights might not be needed because there has been a pattern of fear=looking=nothing there.
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Old 03-16-2016, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Backwoods of Maine
6,941 posts, read 7,693,763 times
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I did not have this fear, as I had a brother closely spaced, and we shared a room. My daughters did not have this problem, for the same reason. It's not just about the dark, it's about being alone.

I now have 6 grandchildren, and some of them have had this problem. It's something you have to live through, and they usually outgrow it by age 7-8 (some sooner). Discipline will not stop it (they tried that). Phone apps won't stop it. Bedtime stories (non-scary, no monsters) help a lot. So do nightlights. I did buy flashlights for a couple of my grandsons. One of them had a TV put into his room, played on low, and he went right to sleep (shows you how boring TV is!).

If you have a dog or cat, having them sleep in the same room with your child will help. Or you could get them a hamster or turtle. Probably one of the most effective things is to monitor their activity level just before bedtime. Try to avoid overly exciting or stimulating activity after supper. This includes TV, gaming, and internet use. More appropriate activities would be reading a story, playing a game, or just talking (but not about monsters).
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Old 03-16-2016, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Hillsborough
2,825 posts, read 5,968,231 times
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My daughter doesn't like sleeping in the total dark. It's not because she thinks there is a monster or anything, she just doesn't like it so dark. The night light did not do the trick for her, so my husband got a dimmer for $15 at Home Depot and installed it in her room, and now she sleeps with the light on the dimmest setting.
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Old 03-16-2016, 12:04 PM
 
Location: In a vehicle.
4,564 posts, read 2,804,169 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mythbusters117 View Post
So my kid is three years old and seemingly overnight he's become afraid of the dark. He's convinced that something lives his closet. I've done some research, both on this site and a few others, and I feel a little more comforted that it seems to be a normal thing.

I've tried searching his room before going to sleep and that hasn't worked much. I downloaded this monster scanning app this morning (https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...byebyemonsters) , which hopefully will help. I can report back here tomorrow with an update on how it worked.

Has anyone here had any success overcoming your kids' fears? Is this something that he simply needs to outgrow or does anyone here have any suggestions of something I can try? If your kid acted the same way, at what age did he or she outgrow it?
Try "Monster Spray" if he's worried about Monsters.

Here's what you do, kids have seen those spray bottles for YEARS and BELIEVE that what's in them, WORKS. So you simply label them "Monster Spray" and then spray the closet IN FRONT OF HIM and thus, he BELIEVES he's safe.

If it's just the dark, a couple night lights may help also.
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Old 03-16-2016, 06:20 PM
 
594 posts, read 1,112,099 times
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Heard a story about two families that each had a child that was afraid of monsters under the bed.

The first family took the child for counseling that lasted for years and cost thousands of $.

The second family bought a saw for $10.00 and cut the legs off the bed.

Couldn't resist....
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Old 03-16-2016, 06:44 PM
 
306 posts, read 186,186 times
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Tell him that he mustn't be afraid because the monsters can smell his fear, and the more afraid he is, the closer they will come....

On a more serious note, at some point as a child I realized that if there really were monsters in my room, they would not be dissuaded or fooled by the blankets under which I was hiding. Could you put into his head that defiance would frighten the monsters, and that sitting up and shaking his fist and yelling, "go away!" would make them leave for the whole rest of the night? I know it's a leap, and maybe smaller steps could be found, but perhaps learning to confront what he fears would be empowering, both for getting a night's sleep and in the longer run.

I don't have a kid, so this is just based on my experience being scared of lots of things for much of my childhood.

(I like the Monster Spray too, same principle.)
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