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Old 03-28-2016, 06:59 PM
 
480 posts, read 453,503 times
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My objection to those examples of "homework" is that they all require the parents to sit down and do the activity with the child. I will take the time to help my child with that, however, the single mom of 3 may not be able to do so, and that isn't a good precedent to start. In my opinion, I think that most homework assigned to children should not require extensive parental involvement, otherwise, you are rewarding the children based on their parents abilities rather than there own.

I understand there will be plenty of assignments given over the years ahead that require our time.

The other comment is that homework that involves finding items in the child's house assumes that the child lives in a house. In most schools, there are some children who are homeless and may not be living in a house / apartment, and I think teachers should be careful not to presume that certain items are available to children at home.
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Old 03-28-2016, 09:45 PM
 
12,922 posts, read 19,812,959 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tiredtired View Post
My objection to those examples of "homework" is that they all require the parents to sit down and do the activity with the child. I will take the time to help my child with that, however, the single mom of 3 may not be able to do so, and that isn't a good precedent to start. In my opinion, I think that most homework assigned to children should not require extensive parental involvement, otherwise, you are rewarding the children based on their parents abilities rather than there own.

I understand there will be plenty of assignments given over the years ahead that require our time.

The other comment is that homework that involves finding items in the child's house assumes that the child lives in a house. In most schools, there are some children who are homeless and may not be living in a house / apartment, and I think teachers should be careful not to presume that certain items are available to children at home.
No, they don't, for most children. Sitting at the table watching them do the work for 5 or 10 minutes is not heavy parental involvement. That comes later when helping them study for a test in the elementary years.
By middle school, kids should be capable of reviewing their own notes.

The teachers I know who work in schools with low income students are very aware of the financial limitations of the family. They don't presume anything will be available at home, including a parent to help with homework.
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Old 03-28-2016, 10:15 PM
 
Location: The point of no return, er, NorCal
6,931 posts, read 4,237,328 times
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I'm lol at 5 minutes of homework. My Kinder is assigned packets, which is useless busy work. They take longer than 5 minutes to complete. I dislike busy work, and I explained that to his teacher. I don't have him do busy work. Since he's exceeding expectations it's not an issue to forgo the busy work.

We lived in NC when my 5th grader was in Kinder, and I don't remember her being assigned busy work. Same for my 3rd grader when we lived in GA. They had nightly/weekly reading assignments, which was to read a grade/level appropriate book and work on sight words. That's it. I'm not a fan of busy work in primary years at all, really.

The system is different in CA for a multitude of reasons.
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Old 03-29-2016, 06:25 AM
 
Location: The sleepy part of New York City
1,869 posts, read 1,043,718 times
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Originally Posted by tiredtired View Post
I'm sorry, I don't think I phrased my question quite right.

I'm wondering what do we need to do with our physical environment at home to have a home that is ready to support a kindergarten student. For example, do we need a desk area (appropriate size for a child) for our child? It's probably too young for "homework" but do they need an area to work on projects at home? Is there anything else with our physical environment that our child will need, so I can work on getting it setup prior to kindergarten?
A desk and/or a specific place to keep their school supplies is important and they have to learn that school supplies aren't to be used for play. I can't tell you how many times I had to go search the house for glue sticks or markers.
My grandson would come home with papers where he'd have to practice his letters, and sometimes he'd have to color something. I'm not sure how much home work or if they even give homework in your K class but it's good practice for them to learn to be responsible for their supplies and keep them in good shape.

You'll probably get notes home with half day reminders, day trips, or that they have to wear a certain color on a certain day, so a large calendar in a noticeable place is a good idea too. They sell magnetic wipe able ones that go on the fridge.

Have a place where she can keep her schoolbag too. You don't want to go crazy searching for that in the morning either. Same with the lunch box. Make sure you empty it and keep it where you'll remember where it is.

Label everything.. so an indelible marker is something you need. Label hats, gloves, jackets, supplies, books etc.
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Old 03-29-2016, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Gorgeous South Florida
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I thought VPK was supposed to prepare them for Kinder. What kind of activities does that entail?
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Old 03-29-2016, 07:58 AM
 
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The example homework of finding someone to read to you for 10 minutes is a terrible homework example. That's a homework assignment for an adult in the house, who is not in school and should not get assigned homework. It'd be much better (although less instructional) to assign the child to look at picture books for 10 minutes, because they can do that with or without adult participation.
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Old 03-29-2016, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,499 posts, read 15,953,803 times
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Originally Posted by tiredtired View Post
The example homework of finding someone to read to you for 10 minutes is a terrible homework example. That's a homework assignment for an adult in the house, who is not in school and should not get assigned homework. It'd be much better (although less instructional) to assign the child to look at picture books for 10 minutes, because they can do that with or without adult participation.
If you, as a parent truly can not find ten minutes, for you or the babysitter or the day care provider or a big brother or big sister or a neighbor (those all count) to read a story (and yes, bedtime stories count, too) to your child than perhaps you should not be a parent.

BTW, most kindergarten teacher do count the child looking at picture books if the parent, babysitter, sibling or whoever is watching the child truly can not spare ten minutes. You could even read the story to the child while the child is eating dinner or taking a bath or waiting for the school bus, if you really can't find ten minutes any place else in your jam packed schedule.


BTW, I said parent but it really is rare for a teacher to list "parent" as the person doing the homework with the child, as there are so many combinations of "family" and caregivers.
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Old 03-29-2016, 08:54 AM
 
9,707 posts, read 7,661,442 times
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Originally Posted by germaine2626 View Post
If you, as a parent truly can not find ten minutes, for you or the babysitter or the day care provider or a big brother or big sister or a neighbor (those all count) to read a story (and yes, bedtime stories count, too) to your child than perhaps you should not be a parent.

BTW, most kindergarten teacher do count the child looking at picture books if the parent, babysitter, sibling or whoever is watching the child truly can not spare ten minutes. You could even read the story to the child while the child is eating dinner or taking a bath or waiting for the school bus, if you really can't find ten minutes any place else in your jam packed schedule.


BTW, I said parent but it really is rare for a teacher to list "parent" as the person doing the homework with the child, as there are so many combinations of "family" and caregivers.
Amen. Preach it, Sister!

Children are not wind-up toys and do not operate by pushbuttons. You cannot just sit a child at a desk and press "go" and expect them to learn. You have to raise them manually, and that includes reading books with them - not just reading through and turning pages as fast as you can, but reading with expression, and pausing to enjoy the illustrations and talk about what's happening. Done properly, it's a joy, not a task, and something which will bring parent(or babysitter, grandparent, older sibling, etc.) and child closer.

My state's Department of Libraries used to distribute free bumper stickers which read, "Read to Your Child for the Fun of It". I wish they were still around, in all fifty states.
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Old 03-29-2016, 08:54 AM
 
480 posts, read 453,503 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by germaine2626 View Post
If you, as a parent truly can not find ten minutes, for you or the babysitter or the day care provider or a big brother or big sister or a neighbor (those all count) to read a story (and yes, bedtime stories count, too) to your child than perhaps you should not be a parent.
I agree that many current parents should not be parents in the first place. Unfortunately, I have never had the opportunity to weigh in on whether two people should engage in the activity that results in producing children.


I will read to my children (as I try to do every night). I'm not concerned about 10 minutes of reading, but I am concerned that there will be big projects that require hours of parent time (science fair, for example) and it'll be hard for us to carve out that amount of required parent time to support our children. I think most of our children's school work should be accomplished by them rather than us.
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Old 03-29-2016, 09:03 AM
 
Location: here
24,473 posts, read 28,761,114 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tiredtired View Post
The example homework of finding someone to read to you for 10 minutes is a terrible homework example. That's a homework assignment for an adult in the house, who is not in school and should not get assigned homework. It'd be much better (although less instructional) to assign the child to look at picture books for 10 minutes, because they can do that with or without adult participation.
I think the best thing you can do right now to prepare is get used to the idea that your kids will need help with homework for the next few years. If you aren't will to give them some time each night, a desk and place for paperwork storage won't matter.
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