U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 01-04-2017, 01:26 PM
Status: "I love you.." (set 10 hours ago)
 
1,504 posts, read 720,292 times
Reputation: 2059

Advertisements

I never think of it as girly as it is so Associated with warriors in my mind,but I get that it's a bit like Brianna etc.
I think the pronunciation is feena in Irish but I prefer fee-Anna.

And yes names influence perception of the person,Katie is very cutesy and luckily my personality is cutesy so I don't mind.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
Fianna is pretty but I picture it more for a girl because of the a at the end. Is it pronounced like it looks Fee Anna?
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
That's exactly what would happen. Anyone seeing Fianna on paper or on a screen will be expecting to see a woman. I read a book once about how names influence one's perception of a person they haven't yet met. Very interesting. If my screen name were AlaskaMaynard, everyone would imagine a totally different person. And it wouldn't be good! And yes, my name really is Erik.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-04-2017, 02:45 PM
 
659 posts, read 573,674 times
Reputation: 888
Quote:
Originally Posted by ApePeeD View Post
The pseudo-African names like Laquesha.
I know you prefaced this with "pseudo" but just for those that may not know, there's absolutely nothing remotely African (not that Africa is a single country or has a single language) about the -esha names. They are all completely made up and have no meaning
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2017, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Prepperland
12,764 posts, read 8,859,767 times
Reputation: 8511
Tall Mountain Goat Hoof Thunder Barker
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2017, 03:23 PM
Status: "I love you.." (set 10 hours ago)
 
1,504 posts, read 720,292 times
Reputation: 2059
They're created largely by people of African descent that's something sweetly African about them.I don't mind them but I'm Australian so not familiar with the associations other than maybe it's considered ghetto or something.

Quote:
Originally Posted by COCUE View Post
I know you prefaced this with "pseudo" but just for those that may not know, there's absolutely nothing remotely African (not that Africa is a single country or has a single language) about the -esha names. They are all completely made up and have no meaning
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2017, 03:38 PM
 
5,152 posts, read 3,041,439 times
Reputation: 12587
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiethegreat View Post
They're created largely by people of African descent that's something sweetly African about them.
I'm sorry, but that really doesn't make much sense. "African-American names" are created by people who, for the most part, have virtually no personal ties to the continent of Africa. There is nothing "African" about these names.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2017, 03:46 PM
 
659 posts, read 573,674 times
Reputation: 888
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiethegreat View Post
They're created largely by people of African descent that's something sweetly African about them.I don't mind them but I'm Australian so not familiar with the associations other than maybe it's considered ghetto or something.
Not sure what you concept of "something sweetly African" is. Does it mean anything that sounds exotic and you cant find a box for it? So assuming the majority of people with these -esha names are of Asian descent then you would say that there was "something sweetly Asian" about the names? Just curious

I guess I just dont know what African sounding is.. given than I know that African languages are as different as night and day from Western to Southern African.. Ask anyone from Africa and to them, these names dont sound African at all

And as Saibot above said, a large number of African Americans are probably more American than some white Americans in that their families have been here for many generations more and they have zero ties to Africa as a continent..

Last edited by COCUE; 01-04-2017 at 03:55 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2017, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Sugarland
12,743 posts, read 11,221,915 times
Reputation: 14376
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
You know, I'd really be interested to learn what the long-term career track in terms of hiring, earning, and promotion is for those with that kind of name versus standard names such as Michael or Cynthia.
Well, my workplace doesn't discriminate against African-Americans so if you're qualified, you will get the job regardless of what your parents named you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2017, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Lake Grove
2,753 posts, read 1,702,175 times
Reputation: 4431
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Fannie? My grandpa had an Aunt Fannie. I don't know what her real name was though...
I had a great Aunt Fannie, her real name was Crucifies, the feminine for Crucifix in Italian. Her parents were from Sicily.

I had another great aunt who went by Jennie, her real name was Giovaninna, I think similar to Joanne. Her parents came from the Naples area.

In Italian American families of NYC, everyone had nicknames
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2017, 04:35 PM
Status: "I love you.." (set 10 hours ago)
 
1,504 posts, read 720,292 times
Reputation: 2059
They have a thousand years of cells connecting them to other Africans.
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I'm sorry, but that really doesn't make much sense. "African-American names" are created by people who, for the most part, have virtually no personal ties to the continent of Africa. There is nothing "African" about these names.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2017, 04:48 PM
 
822 posts, read 540,753 times
Reputation: 1261
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
You know, I'd really be interested to learn what the long-term career track in terms of hiring, earning, and promotion is for those with that kind of name versus standard names such as Michael or Cynthia.
A person's name really doesn't say anything about the person. It just says something about that person's parents.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top