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Old 01-17-2017, 10:23 AM
 
350 posts, read 199,236 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtab4994 View Post
The Ivy League is D-1 and in football they are 1-AA. But they don't give athletic scholarships which makes a lot of people think they are not D-1.


The 1-AA football designation separates them from 1-A football schools like Ohio State and Michigan that place a heavy emphasis on football.

Yes, I stated Division 1 Football which is pretty much the only sport where knowing the conference members is important. Basketball has a much longer schedule, thus many more opponents (so each game is not as meaningful).

The 1-AA designation separates them from other top schools that have Division 1 football like Stanford, Northwestern, Duke and Vanderbilt.
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Old 01-17-2017, 11:17 AM
 
3,137 posts, read 1,234,037 times
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Regardless, my kids won't be attending Ivy League schools. They likely won't have enough in their 529 plans to cover the cost for four years at one of these prestigious universities. I'd rather they look at state colleges. I think it is important (for me) to get them interested in an affordable university. I used to know someone who said his life "was ruined" because he couldn't attend the college he wanted to, because it cost too much and he couldn't get enough scholarships for it. So I don't want my kids to ever get overly focused about one university and feel their whole life depends on that. There are many colleges and universities out there, many good ones, that are even affordable. I've known other people who only wanted to go to one college or nothing else. I don't think it's a good expectation. If they get accepted and can afford it, great. But if not, they need to get their education elsewhere.
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Old 01-17-2017, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Inis Fada
16,282 posts, read 25,923,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spencgr View Post
The "Ivy League" grouping actually began as reference to a NCAA sports conference.
Neat trivia stuff! Never realized that despite the description of ivy halls, it really was a way of describing one school over another in sports competitions.



https://badgerherald.com/news/2003/0...s-of-the-term/
https://blogs.princeton.edu/mudd/201...he-ivy-league/
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Old 01-17-2017, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Inis Fada
16,282 posts, read 25,923,683 times
Reputation: 6913
Quote:
Originally Posted by tassity22 View Post
Regardless, my kids won't be attending Ivy League schools. They likely won't have enough in their 529 plans to cover the cost for four years at one of these prestigious universities. I'd rather they look at state colleges. I think it is important (for me) to get them interested in an affordable university. I used to know someone who said his life "was ruined" because he couldn't attend the college he wanted to, because it cost too much and he couldn't get enough scholarships for it. So I don't want my kids to ever get overly focused about one university and feel their whole life depends on that. There are many colleges and universities out there, many good ones, that are even affordable. I've known other people who only wanted to go to one college or nothing else. I don't think it's a good expectation. If they get accepted and can afford it, great. But if not, they need to get their education elsewhere.
Never say never. DD has 2 apps out to ivies as I write this. They're a long shot, but my understanding is that their endowments lessen one's tuition burden. Fingers crossed.
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Old 01-17-2017, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
7,010 posts, read 6,303,557 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AfriqueNY View Post
I find that interesting because it's easy to do extremely well if you don't have any competition.
It's very difficult to do well in strained financial situations, when you don't know when and where your next meal comes from, when you are living out of a car.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SoulJourn View Post
NYU is not "in a ghetto". It's in NYC's West Village.
Apparently reading comprehension isn't your strong suit is it?
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Old 01-17-2017, 11:57 AM
bg7
 
7,196 posts, read 6,600,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by semiurbanite View Post
Why? Who really cares it's just a silly elitist designation created hundreds of years ago. One could argue that other schools like Amherst College, Stanford and MIT are better schools than most of these so why does it matter so much?


I don't think there's any argument that MIT and Stanford are far ahead of at least half the schools in the OP's sacred list. Its simply factual.


Perhaps the real lesson here is that "Ivy League" as a description is becoming obsolescent.
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Old 01-17-2017, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Denver CO
13,668 posts, read 7,017,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bus man View Post
Perhaps the OP attended an Ivy League school and is annoyed that others are trying to claim their way into their prestige by identifying other high-quality but non-included schools with the Ivy League.


FWIW, I attended one of the schools on the Ivy list. Its name is the only one on the list that could be easily confused for being a state school. But it's not. The state schools in that particular state have the name of the state first, then "State University" after it. Our pet peeve was constantly having our school confused with the State University.
The joke when I was there was that we should change the name to honor our founder and become Franklin University (Happy Birthday today to Ben, as a matter of fact). So when people said "oh, Penn State?" the response would be "No, F.U.!"

Crazy thread though. People are going to be uninformed no matter what, can't imagine how this particular bit of knowledge of a list of 8 schools should be mandatory.
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Old 01-17-2017, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Inis Fada
16,282 posts, read 25,923,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueherons
That isn't uncommon.

Different schools look at different criteria.

She was probably a better fit for Cornell.

One of my friends is in admissions for NYU. They will take a student from an underachieving high school with a B average and good SATs over a student with the same GPA and SATs from an excellent school system. Theory is that if you can excell in the ghetto, you will thrive at NYU.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoulJourn View Post
NYU is not "in a ghetto". It's in NYC's West Village.
blueherons did not state that NYU is 'in a ghetto'. Reread what was written. It has nothing to do with geography and everything to do with tenacity and perseverance.
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Old 01-17-2017, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Inis Fada
16,282 posts, read 25,923,683 times
Reputation: 6913
Quote:
Originally Posted by bg7 View Post
I don't think there's any argument that MIT and Stanford are far ahead of at least half the schools in the OP's sacred list. Its simply factual.


Perhaps the real lesson here is that "Ivy League" as a description is becoming obsolescent.
As the parent of a HS senior at a high performing HS, these students know their Ivies and know which powerhouse non Ivies excel within a given area. Chances are that those who do not will not be applying to any of the aforementioned.
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Old 01-17-2017, 12:27 PM
 
4,066 posts, read 10,826,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twoincomes View Post
(This thread is really intended for those on the west coast. It's probably old knowledge for most of you on the east coast.)

I think it should be mandatory to teach students which colleges are in the Ivy league. This is often confused.

For example, UC-Berkeley is not Ivy league. It's a state college in California. Nor is Caltech or MIT.

There are only 8 Ivy league colleges:
Brown University
Columbia University
Cornell University
Dartmouth College
Harvard University
Princeton University
University of Pennsylvania
Yale University

If the college you're talking about is not on the list above, it's not Ivy league.
WHY would/should this be mandatory??
There are A LOT more important things to teach students than which colleges are part of the Ivy League.
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