U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-31-2017, 05:23 PM
 
42 posts, read 18,308 times
Reputation: 63

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
Because it is actually two languages and two dialects, which typically hijacks the thread.

My stepmother speaks Bisay and Tagalog, and the dialects Bicolano and Waray. We all primarily speak Tagalog as our second language, but our father also speaks yiddish, so I suppose that is our third language though we are not fluent. Both of my sisters are also fluent in the dialects, and Japanese and one has worked professionally translating textbooks.
Thank you for your reply. I googled "Tagalog" among others you mentioned, and I learned a lot from you! You totally deserved it if you needed to hijack this thread! This is what we, at least I, came here for. Seriously, this fascinates me. THANKS!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-31-2017, 05:30 PM
 
42 posts, read 18,308 times
Reputation: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Absolutely! OP, I not only grew up speaking Russian at home, I got home-schooled in Russian grammar, reading and writing from the 1st grade on. After I arrived home from regular school, I'd have an hour of Russian school at home. And all the jobs I've ever had involved use of my language skills. And, I might add, growing up bilingually made the acquisition of other languages a piece of cake. By the end of highschool, I'd learned 4 other languages. And I didn't stop there; I've been learning new languages my whole life. And that paid off job-wise, too.

Another reason to raise the kids with two or three languages is that they learn from direct experience that there are more ways than one to view the world, to categorize objects and concepts, and their minds become much more flexible. They're more easily adaptable to foreign cultures. There are many, many benefits to raising a child multi-lingually.
Thank you for your reply. Russian must be a beautiful language. I have no doubt. My mom studied Russian and spoke a little when Russia and China were "CLOSED" friends in the 50s. I read such books as World And Peace, and Anna Karenina, etc. and I was totally mesmerized by them even in both Chinese and English versions.

Last edited by Love Your Home; 01-31-2017 at 06:08 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-31-2017, 05:31 PM
 
42 posts, read 18,308 times
Reputation: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MsMetal View Post
...
Whichever choice you made, your kids will guilt you into thinking you made the wrong one ;-)
Thank you for your reply. I REALLY like this one! I'll sleep better tonite.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-31-2017, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Bloomington IN
5,385 posts, read 6,711,299 times
Reputation: 12899
Quote:
Originally Posted by BusyMeAK View Post
My daughter who came here at 10 is now, after 11 years, a true bilingual. She got 99% in SAT that meant she can teach English to 99% Americans (of course she can't!), she speaks both languages with barely noticeable accents, probably would have problem writing in her first language, but would easily get used to it after some practice. We don't speak English at home, at all, unless we have guests.
This is the way my future son-in-law is. He came to the U.S at about 8 or 9 speaking no English. He spoke Mandarin. He still speaks to his parents in Mandarin much of the time. His English is probably better than most native born Americans. He has no accent in English. He's told me that in additional to ESL he learned English watching television programs. He has the typical "non-accent" one hears on national news programs.

His pronunciation and accent sounds the same to me as his parents. He reads very little Chinese.

Personally my hope is that if I should ever be lucky enough to have a grandchild, he will speak Mandarin while my daughter speaks English. From previous reading I have done that is the best way to raise multi-lingual children.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-31-2017, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
5,156 posts, read 2,706,575 times
Reputation: 10123
Both my parents were immigrants who spoke their native tongue at home during the early years. I was the first-born, so I only knew their language when I started school. Apparently I picked up English pretty fast, as there was no such thing as bilingual schooling back then. As my parents became more proficient in English, they stopped speaking their native tongue. Today, I would be hopelessly lost if I were to go back to their country. Even though I speak English as a second language, it's really the only language I know.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-31-2017, 09:50 PM
 
Location: On an Island
322 posts, read 160,565 times
Reputation: 752
Not a parent but child of immigrants. My parents speak my native language at home and I'm bilingual. It's great because being bilingual will give them a sense of your culture as well as help in academia and other aspects of life.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-01-2017, 07:40 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
468 posts, read 300,754 times
Reputation: 634
Our boys are bilingual-English and American Sign Language. Older son is becoming better in signing with us, and using English for school and social. Teaching younger son to be more consistent as he tend to switch off between husband and myself.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-01-2017, 07:56 AM
 
42 posts, read 18,308 times
Reputation: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommy2be1053 View Post
Our boys are bilingual-English and American Sign Language. Older son is becoming better in signing with us, and using English for school and social. Teaching younger son to be more consistent as he tend to switch off between husband and myself.
Thank you for your reply. This is very interesting. I know nothing about sign languages. Is learning a sign language in a similar way as learning other languages in terms of starting in early age, or "critical age" between 6-9? That would make a significant different?

(btw - this commonly known language learning "critical age" is recently challenged by a lot of scientific researches which believe it is not an age factor, but more social factors. Of course, most of these are done based not on sign language. Well, that could be another new thread.)

Nevertheless, I'd love to hear your opinion and experience on the "critical age."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-01-2017, 08:40 AM
 
3,279 posts, read 3,122,298 times
Reputation: 7569
Quote:
Originally Posted by Love Your Home View Post
I'd love to listen to your opinions and experience, especially from parents who are the 1st generation immigrants.
Hi Love Your Home,

It sounds like you did speak to them in Chinese at least some of the time. Is that correct?

That's a great thing. They have some of the language deep in their brains and if they choose to learn more of it, it will be easier for them than for a complete non-Chinese person.

I am not a Chinese at all, but I majored in Chinese in college and graduate school, and spent two years in Taiwan as well. I learned mostly mandarin but I picked up a little Taiwanese and Cantonese (I had a girlfriend from Hong Kong for a while).

It's much easier to learn Chinese if you grew up speaking it. Reading and writing is a separate thing. Probably it's easier for Chinese-American kids if they have had exposure to the language. Your kids can certainly take a Chinese course in college and they'll learn plenty. 18-year-olds have very absorbent brains.

Studies on bilingual children show that they are "smarter", and use more of their brain capacity. Bilingualism is a great thing.

Lastly: China is a huge and very important country in the world today, so it's a good idea to learn something about the language and culture. Your kids may not feel they learned very much, but they certainly did and it will be an advantage to them later on.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-01-2017, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Bloomington IN
5,385 posts, read 6,711,299 times
Reputation: 12899
Quote:
Originally Posted by Love Your Home View Post
Thank you for your reply. This is very interesting. I know nothing about sign languages. Is learning a sign language in a similar way as learning other languages in terms of starting in early age, or "critical age" between 6-9? That would make a significant different?

(btw - this commonly known language learning "critical age" is recently challenged by a lot of scientific researches which believe it is not an age factor, but more social factors. Of course, most of these are done based not on sign language. Well, that could be another new thread.)

Nevertheless, I'd love to hear your opinion and experience on the "critical age."
The optimal age is birth to 3. Than 4-7. Than 8-puberty. It's not that children or adults cannot learn a language as they age. It's related to existing "brain wiring" and how easily the brain connections are made. Bi-lingual persons tend to use both sides of their brains more--especially if the languages are very different such as Chinese and English.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top