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Old 03-06-2017, 02:13 PM
 
Location: New York NY
4,133 posts, read 5,945,094 times
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While each kid's maturity level and ability to "handle" violent movies will vary, I think what's more telling in the OP is the mother's reaction to the killings. Kids go with what they know, and if Mom is laughing at murder, the kid may well think that that is the appropriate reaction to such things--whether its a fictional killing or not. FWIW, I think Jon Wick (and I saw the movie) is just not appropriate for little kids and finding a babysitter for a few hours would've been better.

As to kids mimicking their parents' reaction: When ours were small we used to be very afraid when they'd come into the living room and catch us watching Law And Order: SVU. My god. Violence AND sex! But from the very first they started asking questions about that show and we eventually all watched it together every week, and used several episodes as "teaching moments" on both subjects. Sometimes they were horrified--hell, so were we sometimes, and we showed it. But they weren't ever traumatized. Some of our friends thought letting kids watch that (they must have been in 4th or 5th grade maybe) was weird. And maybe it was. But our kids learned stuff about sex and violence and learned it safely from someone responsible--us! How parents react to such things makes all the difference.

Last edited by citylove101; 03-06-2017 at 03:22 PM..
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Old 03-06-2017, 02:27 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
10,860 posts, read 18,892,348 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kibbiekat View Post
What do you mean by "fine?"
She knows the difference between fiction and reality, she's not going to have nightmares from it. We don't watch things that have strong sexual themes because that triggers her OCD but watching violent movies doesn't.
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Old 03-06-2017, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma
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I'm old fashioned. I would never take my kids to see an R rated movie until they were 17 and could handle it. Period.
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Old 03-07-2017, 11:30 AM
 
Location: here
24,469 posts, read 28,737,691 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
She knows the difference between fiction and reality, she's not going to have nightmares from it. We don't watch things that have strong sexual themes because that triggers her OCD but watching violent movies doesn't.
I think there is more to it than nightmares. I just don't think it's as simple as that.
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Old 03-12-2017, 03:07 AM
 
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the first r rated movie that my parents took me to see was die hard 2, a few months after the exorcist 3. i as probably 6, 7 at the oldest. my parents didn't do much in the way of sheltering my siblings and I from stuff like that, whether it was violence and sex in movies or violence and sex in music. i'm pretty sure i'll be the same way with my own.
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Old 03-12-2017, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Type 0.7 Kardashev
10,577 posts, read 6,825,417 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
I think a big part of the youth violence we have today is that so many kids have become completely desensitized to gore and graphic violence, blood, etc. Little Jimmy might "know" that it is not real and not have nightmares, but little Jimmy also might later not have any problem, or nightmares, with seeing a person in real life, have his head blown off. That's a problem in my view. It's why I never allowed my son to see age-inappropriate movies. And I think it's a sorry commentary of the parents that do.
It would probably shock you to know that crime in general - including youth crime - has been declining for decades since peaking in the 1970s/80s. So the whole thesis of more violence in media = more violence in the culture is simply wrong as it is premised on something that is not happening.

Back in the 'good old days' (when supposedly young people were all well-behaved), public executions were considered fine spectator sports. Then there was baiting bears, burning cats for entertainment, and so forth.
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