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Old 01-01-2018, 01:30 PM
 
15,054 posts, read 16,325,177 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodburyWoody View Post
Yeah, the cookie sales. That ruins it for so many families (no sarcasim, the families in our daughter's troop dread it and are vocal about it, but there is no out).
You do not have to sell cookies.

FAQs - Girl Scout Cookies

Quote:
Does a Girl Scout troop have to sell cookies if it doesn’t want to?

Girl Scout product sales offer girls a great way to finance their Girl Scout activities and special projects. Participation in the Girl Scout Cookie Program is voluntary and requires written permission by a parent or guardian. Annually, about 65 percent of registered Girl Scouts choose to participate in the program.
Much of the money from the cookies goes to the council and helps to support the camps and other activities they put on. Some goes to the troop and can be used to finance various things the troop does.

 
Old 01-01-2018, 01:37 PM
 
5,096 posts, read 3,003,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
That seemed strange to me at first, then I realized its purpose is to exclude transgender children.
Many people including me would consider that a plus, which is evidence of the deep divide that leads parents to start new groups instead of signing their daughters up for Girl Scouts.

I started parting ways philosophically with the Girl Scouts back when I was still a badge-wearing, cookie-selling member. One year the cookie boxes had little stories on them, including one about a group of girls on a bike ride bragging about "leaving the boys in the dust. Ha ha!" Even at age 12, I thought that brand of "feminism" was all wrong.
 
Old 01-01-2018, 02:13 PM
 
9,789 posts, read 5,999,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Or another possible alternative is Boy Scouts are starting to open up female Cub Scouts Packs
Since the OP's issue was the cookie sale fundraiser, the boy scouts wouldn't be a good alternative. They also have fundraising sales such as popcorn, chocolate bars, snf2 Christmas trees/wreaths. They also often fundraise at local fairs and festivals with a food booth. I see Boy Scouts constantly doing fundraisers year round. At least with the girl scouts, its only during cookie season.

And yes, I know it varies by troop. But its doubtful that there is a troop out there that doesnt do any fundraising.
 
Old 01-01-2018, 02:14 PM
 
10,027 posts, read 6,139,067 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Many people including me would consider that a plus, which is evidence of the deep divide that leads parents to start new groups instead of signing their daughters up for Girl Scouts.

I started parting ways philosophically with the Girl Scouts back when I was still a badge-wearing, cookie-selling member. One year the cookie boxes had little stories on them, including one about a group of girls on a bike ride bragging about "leaving the boys in the dust. Ha ha!" Even at age 12, I thought that brand of "feminism" was all wrong.
Ewwwww Empowering girls is so gross.........

The bio comment on the AHG's "partial discrimination policy" had me confused for a second. My first thought went to adopted kids and then to animals before I realized it was to discriminate against transgendered children. Even the boyscouts allow transgendered boys in their groups (or at least I know a few tans boys in BSA).
 
Old 01-01-2018, 02:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFlyingBird View Post
Ewwwww Empowering girls is so gross.........
I'm all for empowering girls. But I'm not for the "girls are superior to boys" line that the GS were pushing. I had brothers. I liked boys. Even as a kid, I thought mutual respect would take us all a lot farther than either gender thinking they were better than the other.

I have a hard time thinking that the Boy Scouts selling products which had statements like "Haha...we beat those girls" printed on them would go over very well.
 
Old 01-01-2018, 02:46 PM
 
9,789 posts, read 5,999,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I'm all for empowering girls. But I'm not for the "girls are superior to boys" line that the GS were pushing. I had brothers. I liked boys. Even as a kid, I thought mutual respect would take us all a lot farther than either gender thinking they were better than the other.
I was in Girl Scouts for many years, never once were we taught that "girls are superior to boys".
 
Old 01-01-2018, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Texas
4,676 posts, read 1,645,916 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I'm all for empowering girls. But I'm not for the "girls are superior to boys" line that the GS were pushing. I had brothers. I liked boys. Even as a kid, I thought mutual respect would take us all a lot farther than either gender thinking they were better than the other.
My experience in GS was that some of the moms didn't welcome dads showing up at functions, even if they were just standing on the sidelines. And these were dads who had passed background checks and were registered volunteers. I'm all for empowering girls - but not at the expense of negativity towards boys/men. We all have to learn to get along. I had to explain to them that men could register as volunteers, they didn't know that. They were surprised to find out that dads could be involved. The only thing I'm aware of that GS doesn't allow dads to get involved in, is the overnight campouts.
 
Old 01-01-2018, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Denver area
20,929 posts, read 21,572,635 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundaydrive00 View Post
I was in Girl Scouts for many years, never once were we taught that "girls are superior to boys".
Me neither; nor did it ever came up when I took training to be a Brownie leader. I was a Girl Scout in the '70s...we had 2 dads as leaders.

Just goes to show how much each troop can vary. Do your research.
 
Old 01-01-2018, 03:03 PM
 
10,027 posts, read 6,139,067 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
My experience in GS was that some of the moms didn't welcome dads showing up at functions, even if they were just standing on the sidelines. And these were dads who had passed background checks and were registered volunteers. I'm all for empowering girls - but not at the expense of negativity towards boys/men. We all have to learn to get along. I had to explain to them that men could register as volunteers, they didn't know that. They were surprised to find out that dads could be involved. The only thing I'm aware of that GS doesn't allow dads to get involved in, is the overnight campouts.
I think just like any thing with moms, it can get really cliquish. One alpha mom cares and then other moms follow.

I haven't liked the GSA much (it always seems so disorganized or the moms have a clique and so new moms are kind of ignored). But I didn't personally see any "boys are icky" vibe.

Some BSA troops *really* don't seem to want moms involved. So who really knows. One whole group (like the thing above the troops) refused entry to a boy with mild and easily accommodate disabilities. It was just the top leaders bias. But if you go to the website, it is all about inclusion.

Anyways...Maybe art classes?
 
Old 01-01-2018, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Texas
4,676 posts, read 1,645,916 times
Reputation: 9882
Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFlyingBird View Post
I think just like any thing with moms, it can get really cliquish. One alpha mom cares and then other moms follow.

I haven't liked the GSA much (it always seems so disorganized or the moms have a clique and so new moms are kind of ignored). But I didn't personally see any "boys are icky" vibe.

Some BSA troops *really* don't seem to want moms involved. So who really knows. One whole group (like the thing above the troops) refused entry to a boy with mild and easily accommodate disabilities. It was just the top leaders bias. But if you go to the website, it is all about inclusion.

Anyways...Maybe art classes?
I don't know about the history of Boy Scouts, but Girl Scouts was founded by Juliette Gordon Low who was deaf. So it becomes interesting when GS troops want to exclude girls with disabilities, since the organization was founded by a woman who had a disability. Some parents do not understand the purpose of Scouts. They want to form cliques and exclude.


I think kids should learn to get along with others from different backgrounds and who are different from them.
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