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Old Yesterday, 02:24 PM
 
2,727 posts, read 8,496,132 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by parentologist View Post
This is a big problem, in that kids are not tracked according to their level, but according to their age. My experience was that my son, who was reading Harry Potter to himself for pleasure before entering kindergarten, was perfectly happy there, because of the group setting, the specials (gym, art, music), just the social setting. I taught him a lot at home - I taught him a foreign language, did math with him on our own, started him on private music lessons, athletics outside of school.

The only way you're going to get him to be taught at a higher level is at a private school, and only one that will teach him according to his level - not that easy to find.
Yes, that is what I did with my others supplemented at home until about 4th grade or so.

Any private school recomendations parentologist? I believe you are from CT too! I feel as though we make too much to qualify for help financially, but still don't make enough for the 25,000 a year price tag most are asking. Uggh
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Old Yesterday, 03:10 PM
 
2,342 posts, read 776,022 times
Reputation: 5322
Homeschool.
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Old Yesterday, 05:12 PM
 
Location: STL area
368 posts, read 194,800 times
Reputation: 556
I sent my kids to Montessori school. They could all read and do math before K. Basic public K would have been a poor fit for them. But they are not really gifted (maybe in math but not across the board) just bright, high achievers. We’ve stuck with private school. If that wasn’t an option I probably would have supplemented but our public schools do offer more than yours does as well.
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Old Yesterday, 05:14 PM
 
11,858 posts, read 10,895,901 times
Reputation: 32968
You don't even know if this will be a problem. He might be perfectly happy. Just make sure you're doing enrichment at home and are aware of what kind of classes and programs he can participate in at school in the future. I was one of those gifted and talented kids. It only sucked when I saw other kids put in more advanced levels that I knew I could handle.

Talk with the teacher about giving him some more advanced things to do when he finishes his work ahead of time. Offer to buy a few more advanced workbooks or just make sure there are reading books for him to read for pleasure once he completes the class requirements.
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Old Yesterday, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
1,494 posts, read 1,387,202 times
Reputation: 1117
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtovenice View Post
Homeschool.
That was going to be my answer! It worked well for my son who was on the other end of the spectrum as well.
There are also online programs- free in some states, and a plethora of scial and enrichment activities. Of course if the OP needs to work full-time it won't work.
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Old Yesterday, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
7,200 posts, read 6,509,934 times
Reputation: 14352
I read the entire library at my elementary school by the time third grade started and it was no big deal.

Kids will take care of themselves if they aren't being stimulated enough.

He hasn't even started school yet, see how he adjusts and go from there.
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Old Yesterday, 10:29 PM
 
Location: The point of no return, er, NorCal
6,453 posts, read 3,634,236 times
Reputation: 8310
Quote:
Originally Posted by KH02 View Post
My son is only 4, but will be starting Kindergarten in the fall. Our public school does NOT have a gifted program. The school seems to push back, or at least make it difficult for you to get them to give separate work to one child. Anyone have any tips or luck in getting their advanced child help?

My son is already on the younger side for Kindergarten, so I don't want to skip him a grade. I just want him to jump up a grade for reading or have them put him in a class with another child who is already reading. Getting some more advanced math work for him would be great as well. If it's needed as info for you: he is reading, knows all his money (what it's worth, counting it) telling time by hour and half hour, and can add and subtract in his head.

A private school would be ideal, however, we simply can't afford it.

I'm worried he will be bored in kindergarten just learning letter sounds etc. Any help would be appreciated. Perhaps enrichment ideas for outside of school?
Why not just let him play and be a normal 4 year old? What's so wrong with prioritizing play-based/child-led learning and postponing academics? You can still facilitate a rich learning environment without getting into curriculum and academics.

My older two are gifted learners, which I knew when they were very young. They're also very talented artists. I never pushed them to read early or implemented structured learning. I simply observed their areas of interests and strengths and facilitated a learning environment they could thrive in. I've done the same with my very bright and advanced preschooler.

Most public schools, at least in my area, do not offer accelerated or gifted programs until 3rd grade. If that looks to be the case for your area you can supplement at home until such program becomes available.
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Old Today, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Bloomington, IL
10,488 posts, read 5,222,997 times
Reputation: 22927
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
All three of my kids could do all of that before kindergarten - it just shows you've taken time to teach him and he's bright.

There's a lot of value in letting him be the brightest kid in the class. (which, by the way, mine weren't - about half the kids were as advanced as they were entering kinder. depends on what community you live in, maybe).

A really excellent first grade teacher told me that the brightest kids don't get bored. "Bored" is what kids say they are if they don't understand the work.

He could always, obviously, do better work with what's given to him. If the worksheet calls for you to put the first letter of the word pictured, he can write the whole word. If you have to write a few words describing an event, he can write a paragraph.

In my observation, the "gifted" programs in elementary schools end up being for hard working kids, not kids who are truly "gifted" as the program was intended.
I agreed about the "bored". I finished my work quickly and whipped out a book of my own to read when I was done.

OP- If he is that advanced he likely won't need a tutor, just exposure to more advanced ideas in those topics that he can do when he's done with the regular assignment - that will be cheap for you to find.
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Old Today, 09:50 AM
Status: "A new year!" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
81,660 posts, read 93,081,016 times
Reputation: 28309
Quote:
Originally Posted by JrzDefector View Post
You don't even know if this will be a problem. He might be perfectly happy. Just make sure you're doing enrichment at home and are aware of what kind of classes and programs he can participate in at school in the future. I was one of those gifted and talented kids. It only sucked when I saw other kids put in more advanced levels that I knew I could handle.

Talk with the teacher about giving him some more advanced things to do when he finishes his work ahead of time. Offer to buy a few more advanced workbooks or just make sure there are reading books for him to read for pleasure once he completes the class requirements.
Agreed! As one poster said, many kids were as advanced as hers were.

The boredom issue does seem to depend on the kid. Some will go on to do something else while the rest of the class is working on a project, others will find the other kid(s) who are also finished and get into "trouble".

I do think boredom is over-rated as a school problem, and that many kids say they're bored when they're just not getting the work.
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Old Today, 10:03 AM
 
1,927 posts, read 889,430 times
Reputation: 1895
A good teacher will assess and give appropriate work. My son is in public school and advanced / tracking for AG once they have it (starts in 3rd grade here). His teacher gives him harder books to read and more complex math problems. Has been this way since kindergarten. He is doing algebra in 2nd grade and reading at a 5th grade level. They offered to skip him a grade but we declined due to emotional maturity and not wanting to pressure him too much. I went into kindergarten reading chapter books and did fine. Don’t stress over it, see how it goes and reassess later.
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