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Old 02-11-2018, 01:47 PM
 
837 posts, read 432,741 times
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People do it because they are rude, thoughtless, selfish, and frankly don't care if you are inconvenienced while they have child-free time. What bugs me is when you have a party that costs per child and a parent pulls the "drop the other kid off" and not only do you have to watch that kid, but you also owe another $20 for the party.
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Old 02-11-2018, 01:56 PM
 
2,321 posts, read 988,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coloradomom22 View Post
People do it because they are rude, thoughtless, selfish, and frankly don't care if you are inconvenienced while they have child-free time. What bugs me is when you have a party that costs per child and a parent pulls the "drop the other kid off" and not only do you have to watch that kid, but you also owe another $20 for the party.


I am one of those mothers who would have politely refused the other children , or called the parent up and asked them to pick up their child/ren or had my husband drop them right back home. I did that once when a mother brought her three younger siblings of my son's friend who came over to play. I walked them right back up the street and made sure she opened the door to receive her kids.
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Old 02-11-2018, 02:29 PM
Status: "Autumn!" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,736 posts, read 98,329,883 times
Reputation: 31146
Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
We're going to stop inviting one kid, whose parents always drop off the 5 year old sibling along with her. I don't want to make an avenue for that rudeness anymore.
A suggestion-if it's real important to your kid that this child attend, put "no siblings please" on the invitation.
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Old 02-11-2018, 02:31 PM
 
10,090 posts, read 6,417,084 times
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Wow...that is rude.

When my kids were little, all our parties parents stayed. I would make sure to add in the invite siblings were welcome so I didn't put them in the spot of having to try to find a sitter. So bringing siblings was common...but the parents stayed and watched their own kids.

Now that they are older...I cant imagine someone dropping off an uninvited kid. When going through guest lists I do ask my kids if they know any siblings (in one case one had a twin in another class) so I can invite any sibling that would *actually* feel left out. (In the case of the twin, the parents thanked me but said they look forward to one on one time and use things like parties to have special time with the other twin).

I don't even know...that just seems like a level of rudeness I haven't come across. I might have been running after the car "Hey lady, you forgot your kid!!!"
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Old 02-11-2018, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Texas
6,080 posts, read 2,197,236 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
A suggestion-if it's real important to your kid that this child attend, put "no siblings please" on the invitation.
That's a good idea. Hopefully they would read that and abide by those terms.
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Old 02-11-2018, 03:49 PM
Status: "one of the wettest from the standpoint of water" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Denver CO
18,769 posts, read 9,837,137 times
Reputation: 27440
Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
That's a good idea. Hopefully they would read that and abide by those terms.
I find that the people who need a clue somehow always think that even a blunt statement doesn't apply to them. Oh, she doesn't mean us, we've always brought Younger Sibling and she loves to have him there.

I think not inviting the sibling is the only way to guarantee the thoughtless parents won't continue to be thoughtless. But I suppose it's worth a shot if your child wants to keep their friendship with the older kid.

But I remain amazed at what some people think is ok to do.
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Old 02-11-2018, 08:19 PM
 
Location: here
24,457 posts, read 28,559,939 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
My daughter had 3 siblings show up at her party. The parents just dropped off the kids and left, like it was free childcare for a couple of hours. The siblings were much younger than the other kids and one of them was a toddler and cried the whole time. My daughter went to another b-day party this week and the same thing happened to the parents who hosted the party: younger siblings dropped off, parents walked out real fast.


So for my child's b-day next year, instead of a party, we're going to do something alternative. I'm thinking maybe she can take a friend to a movie place to get their nails/hair done, then dinner.
Yes, that's rude.

I had that happen only once that I can remember, but the mom was very nice, and contacted me ahead of time. She was the only parent available, and would have to bring the 2nd kid, or not bring either of them.
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Old 02-11-2018, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,395 posts, read 15,716,476 times
Reputation: 38458
Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
We're going to stop inviting one kid, whose parents always drop off the 5 year old sibling along with her. I don't want to make an avenue for that rudeness anymore.
Have you actually told the parent "Mary wants to do 10 year old activities with your daughter Susie. Please do not leave your five year old." If yes, what did they say?
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Old 02-11-2018, 10:08 PM
 
7,590 posts, read 5,331,393 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
Why do some parents bring other siblings to a b-day party when only one sibling was invited? I thought this was bad manners.
You'd probably have to ask the other parents. I have no idea
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Old 02-11-2018, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Rivendell
412 posts, read 300,663 times
Reputation: 1112
When we did parties we invited the main kids but if we also knew the family well and the other sibling was also a friend then that was fine. No problem with that. It's the RSVPing that made me very upset because so many parents don't even have the courtesy to let you know they won't be there. So you're preparing for the just in case scenario and then don't know who actually will show up.
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