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Old 04-07-2018, 08:21 AM
 
12,933 posts, read 12,235,965 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
I thought of something else. Clip the dog's toenails once a week so they are always blunt. If you don't know how, get someone to show you how.

If both you and the dog are trained for toenail clipping, it takes no more than a minute, it is stress-free, and will help to prevent accidental scratches.

You can also use a Drexel tool to keep nails short, if you don't want to use nail clippers.
*Dremel

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Old 04-07-2018, 08:28 AM
 
12,933 posts, read 12,235,965 times
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Some dogs just "get it" when a newborn comes into the house. Others just don't. I would have a few sessions with a trainer and have a dog walking service lined up in case one is needed. Some ways to build quality time with your dog while the baby is sleeping in those early weeks (when a lot of my friends who are moms confessed to being bored out of their minds) is to teach the dog little commands. There are books on training tricks - ask whatever trainer you hire to recommend one, and when you have a few spare moments, get out a bag of treats and teach the dog some silly little tricks or behaviors for the fun of it. It's great for building on your relationship with your dog.

Once you've got the tricks trained, if the dog is feeling neglected, you can steal a few minutes here and there during the day to run them through their commands.
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Old 04-07-2018, 09:10 AM
 
Location: 500 miles from home
26,449 posts, read 14,707,346 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OttoR View Post
Do it together. Your dog needs plenty of exercise and structure if you want any sanity in the house. You need exercise to be able to keep your energy up and your sanity. The baby needs fresh air (even if it’s cold) and most go to sleep in the stroller. Put the baby in the stroller, grab the dog, and go for a couple of brisk 30 minute walks each day. The dog should be hoofing it, not sniffing and exploring. This will go a long way to keeping your dog calm and happy. In addition to that, teach your dog the “place” command if you haven’t already. Solidk9training on YouTube has some great videos on this. This will come in handy once the baby gets mobile, or even now when you don’t want the dog running under foot or waking the baby. Also make sure the dog is crate trained and that you utilize the crate. Teach your dog “leave it” if you haven’t already. This will prevent the dog from snatching up dropped pacifiers and dropped food and from taking food from the baby once it’s mobile. I’m sure it goes without saying to never leave the dog unattended with the baby and once the baby is mobile, do not let him crawl on the dog, lift its gums, pull its ears, ride or sit on it, etc. This is not cute and it is not safe.
Totally agree with taking the dog and baby on walks. I had a little Maltese (my first baby before I had a real baby) and I thought it would be really hard. It really wasn't - though Casper did have to take a bit of a back seat. I would be rocking the baby and throwing the ball down the hallway for Casper at the same time. My son loved riding in his stroller and Casper loved walking along with us.

It did work out. Somehow my son never really got rough with Casper so we never had a biting issue, tail or ear pulling, etc.

Yeah, the waking the baby thing was sometimes a pain. Casper would see a deer outside and start barking and wake the baby. I learned to pull the curtains or sometimes we would all three just take a nap together.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SactoBankerGirl View Post
I'm so glad you are asking this question. I had a basset hound when my son was born. I was so enraptured by the baby, that I apparently neglected my dog. She developed glaucoma. I didn't notice when it was just in one eye. I took her to the vet when she started bumping into walls. By then, it was too late to help her.


I wish I had worked harder to establish the balance you are looking for. This was over 20 years ago and it still haunts me.
We all do the best we can at the time. That's it. While I was able to balance my newborn and doggie; I feel that I neglected my dog as my son got older and was in kindergarden, preschool, playdates, tball - whatever. I took Casper along when I could but he got old, blind and senile kind of while I was so busy working and running from here to there.

My son was active - Casper used to follow us on our bikes - and I really did not know what to do with a senile old dog that was no longer able to be with us.

So - yeah. I didn't handle the 'old dog' part of Casper's life very well.
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Old 04-07-2018, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Tennesee
10,028 posts, read 2,663,813 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JrzDefector View Post
*Dremel

Correct. Nevertheless, it's very good advice. I've never been bitten by one of my dogs, but I have been scratched when I let the nails get a bit too long. I have never used a Dremel on their nails, but I suspect it would leave them smoother than just clipping. Sounds like a good skill to learn.
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Old 04-07-2018, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,007 posts, read 3,543,706 times
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OP, unless you have a behavioral problem dog, which can be worked with if it isn't a bad case of aggression, then it is definitely do-able to own a dog and have a baby.

I loved our dog (a purebred Labrador way back when), but I loved my kids more. We got our Lab puppy when our youngest was 2. The dog started showing a bit of aggression when she was only 6 months old. The last straw was when my brother (an adult) put his hand on her back underneath the kitchen table and she snarled around at the touch of his hand. She never touched him with her teeth, but that was enough. I saw it happen and was shocked and disgusted.

From that day on, I vowed that if I couldn't work with her and nip the aggression in the bud, she was GONE. Labradors are known to be great, gentle family dogs, but she had an aggressive streak to her. All it took was a couple of severe reprimands and she never showed aggression again.

She ended up to be a wonderful dog and was both of our son's companion wherever they went (we lived in a rural area). She lived until she was 14 1/2 and our two boys cried like babies when we had to put her down.

I just hope your dog won't be another statistic ending up discarded at a local animal shelter because you haven't trained your dog in the first place, or don't "have time" for it.

To be blunt: having a baby is NO excuse to get rid of a family pet,
unless there is a damned good reason.

You must have known when you got the dog that you were planning on having children also, unless the pregnancy was an accident? Hire a professional to train it if he/she needs some training, rather than just give up on him/her.

It doesn't take long before you find the baby isn't so time demanding that you can't handle both raising a baby and owning a dog.
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Old 04-07-2018, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,315 posts, read 15,610,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JrzDefector View Post
(snip) Some ways to build quality time with your dog while the baby is sleeping in those early weeks
(when a lot of my friends who are moms confessed to being bored out of their minds).
What? What? What? We must run in completely different circles. I'm a mother of two, grandmother of two with dozens and dozens of friends & relatives who have had children and I have never heard any new mother say that they were "bored out of their minds" during the first few weeks after having a baby. Too exhausted to take a shower, yes. Too busy to eat, yes. Too tired to get dressed, yes. No time to run errands, do laundry, buy groceries, yes. But, never so "bored" that they needed to find a hobby like training a dog. And, these were all two parent households. I would imagine that it would be much more exhausting and stressful for a single parent of a newborn.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JrzDefector View Post
(snip) Some ways to build quality time with your dog while the baby is sleeping in those early weeks
(when a lot of my friends who are moms confessed to being bored out of their minds) is to teach the dog little commands. There are books on training tricks - ask whatever trainer you hire to recommend one, and when you have a few spare moments, get out a bag of treats and teach the dog some silly little tricks or behaviors for the fun of it. It's great for building on your relationship with your dog.

Once you've got the tricks trained, if the dog is feeling neglected, you can steal a few minutes here and there during the day to run them through their commands.
Back to the regular thread.
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Old 04-08-2018, 10:13 AM
 
25 posts, read 14,378 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gouligann View Post
OP, unless you have a behavioral problem dog, which can be worked with if it isn't a bad case of aggression, then it is definitely do-able to own a dog and have a baby.

I loved our dog (a purebred Labrador way back when), but I loved my kids more. We got our Lab puppy when our youngest was 2. The dog started showing a bit of aggression when she was only 6 months old. The last straw was when my brother (an adult) put his hand on her back underneath the kitchen table and she snarled around at the touch of his hand. She never touched him with her teeth, but that was enough. I saw it happen and was shocked and disgusted.

From that day on, I vowed that if I couldn't work with her and nip the aggression in the bud, she was GONE. Labradors are known to be great, gentle family dogs, but she had an aggressive streak to her. All it took was a couple of severe reprimands and she never showed aggression again.

She ended up to be a wonderful dog and was both of our son's companion wherever they went (we lived in a rural area). She lived until she was 14 1/2 and our two boys cried like babies when we had to put her down.

I just hope your dog won't be another statistic ending up discarded at a local animal shelter because you haven't trained your dog in the first place, or don't "have time" for it.

To be blunt: having a baby is NO excuse to get rid of a family pet,
unless there is a damned good reason.

You must have known when you got the dog that you were planning on having children also, unless the pregnancy was an accident? Hire a professional to train it if he/she needs some training, rather than just give up on him/her.

It doesn't take long before you find the baby isn't so time demanding that you can't handle both raising a baby and owning a dog.
It's great to hear your story about your Labrador.

Yes, I did consider future kids when I got my dog. This possibility was a major factor in choosing a breed and breeder. (Please don't judge me for getting a dog from a breeder. I considered the humane society and visited a couple dogs there to possibly adopt. I think it's wonderful to adopt from the humane society and other rescues, but many (not all) of the dogs there are not ideal around babies.). The breeder I got my dog from has young kids who play with the dogs and they do a great job of socializing the puppies. Also, I got my dog into training classes after I got her. She since been around kids and toddlers at my place, and she does great. A couple weeks ago, my niece and nephew stayed with me for part of their Spring Break. Like I mentioned earlier, she can struggle with "stay", so I'm working on it... I'm walking into other rooms with treats and telling her to stay and rewarding when she does. I think she'll get there. Yesterday, as we were on a walk, a family walked out of a neighbor's carrying a baby in his/her carrier and with a toddler. I told my dog to sit and stay as they crossed our path. She stayed very well. Also, I have a dog walker come now, every weekday while I'm at work. They are 2 sweet, retired ladies who alternate days, and they can continue to come when I have the baby. (I think they'll be excited to hear the news.). Another thing... I'm only 8 weeks along. I think I have plenty of time to get my dog ready.

All these factors to say... It's my boyfriend who thinks I need to get rid of the dog now, and that it will be too big of a struggle to balance both. (I lost my job last September and moved a few states away for a new, better job, so we're not currently in the same place.). It's the biggest fight we've ever had. I'm a little blind sighted because in the past, he's enjoyed hanging out with my dog. One big reason is that his coworker's wife had a dog and ended up getting rid of her dog a couple months after they had their first baby. I'm pretty frustrated in general, because he seems to be on a page where we're going to do everything the way his coworker and coworker's wife did things, and while I appreciate hearing their experiences and tips, I'm not always on the same page. I'm sharing things with my boyfriend that I think would be good principles or good to do to prepare, and his response is, "I don't need to look at that/read that, (his coworker) tells me everything I need to know." So, I guess in general, the dog piece is one part of a larger issue here.
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Old 04-08-2018, 10:21 AM
Status: "17 pit bull deaths this year; 8 since Memorial Day." (set 14 days ago)
 
1,144 posts, read 303,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sky2224 View Post
It's great to hear your story about your Labrador.

Yes, I did consider future kids when I got my dog. This possibility was a major factor in choosing a breed and breeder. (Please don't judge me for getting a dog from a breeder. I considered the humane society and visited a couple dogs there to possibly adopt. I think it's wonderful to adopt from the humane society and other rescues, but many (not all) of the dogs there are not ideal around babies.). The breeder I got my dog from has young kids who play with the dogs and they do a great job of socializing the puppies. Also, I got my dog into training classes after I got her. She since been around kids and toddlers at my place, and she does great. A couple weeks ago, my niece and nephew stayed with me for part of their Spring Break. Like I mentioned earlier, she can struggle with "stay", so I'm working on it... I'm walking into other rooms with treats and telling her to stay and rewarding when she does. I think she'll get there. Yesterday, as we were on a walk, a family walked out of a neighbor's carrying a baby in his/her carrier and with a toddler. I told my dog to sit and stay as they crossed our path. She stayed very well. Also, I have a dog walker come now, every weekday while I'm at work. They are 2 sweet, retired ladies who alternate days, and they can continue to come when I have the baby. (I think they'll be excited to hear the news.). Another thing... I'm only 8 weeks along. I think I have plenty of time to get my dog ready.

All these factors to say... It's my boyfriend who thinks I need to get rid of the dog now, and that it will be too big of a struggle to balance both. (I lost my job last September and moved a few states away for a new, better job, so we're not currently in the same place.). It's the biggest fight we've ever had. I'm a little blind sighted because in the past, he's enjoyed hanging out with my dog. One big reason is that his coworker's wife had a dog and ended up getting rid of her dog a couple months after they had their first baby. I'm pretty frustrated in general, because he seems to be on a page where we're going to do everything the way his coworker and coworker's wife did things, and while I appreciate hearing their experiences and tips, I'm not always on the same page. I'm sharing things with my boyfriend that I think would be good principles or good to do to prepare, and his response is, "I don't need to look at that/read that, (his coworker) tells me everything I need to know." So, I guess in general, the dog piece is one part of a larger issue here.
First, stop apologizing for where you bought your dog! You donít owe an explanation for not buying a dog from a shelter! It sounds like you made an educated and well thought out decision. Be proud of your purebred dog from a reputable (hopefully) breeder.

Second, nothing youíve posted seems concerning. You seem to have a good handle on your dog, youíre acknowledging and working on the weak areas, and you have a dog walker. There is no reason to think you would have to rehome your dog or that a dog and baby will be more than you can manage. Yes, it may be stressful at first, depending on your personality, but that just comes with the territory of having a newborn. You will fall into a routine that works in no time.
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Old 04-08-2018, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,315 posts, read 15,610,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sky2224 View Post
(snip) I'm pretty frustrated in general, because he seems to be on a page where we're going to do everything the way his coworker and coworker's wife did things, and while I appreciate hearing their experiences and tips, I'm not always on the same page.

I'm sharing things with my boyfriend that I think would be good principles or good to do to prepare, and his response is, "I don't need to look at that/read that, (his coworker) tells me everything I need to know." So, I guess in general, the dog piece is one part of a larger issue here.
It is good that you realize that your BF is not as interested in learning about being a good father as he could be/should be at this point in time. Now, on the bright side, if you are only eight weeks along, especially if you live apart from your BF, the baby may not seem "real" to him. Sometimes first time fathers do not become actively involved until they start going to pre-natal doctor's appointments and classes with their partner, and start doing things like buying cribs, strollers and car seats and getting the nursery ready.

IMHO, any parent that relies on only one source of information, whether it is just their pediatrician, just their parent, just one expert's books, or, as in your BF's case just one co-worker, is pretty short sighted.

Even if the co-worker has a masters degree in child development and teaches parenting classes the way that they raise their child may be radically different than the best way, for you and your BF, to raise your child. I am guessing that later on your BF will start to seek out information from other people, such as friends and relatives as well as from books. There are still many people who do not share news of their pregnancy until after the second trimester, so he may not have even shared the good news with his other friends and relatives who have children at this point.

Good luck and best wishes to you.
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Old 04-10-2018, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,628 posts, read 98,067,872 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
Concerning "germs", there is study after study showing that children exposed to dirt are less likely to develop allergies and they are more resistant to disease.

I suggest that you keep the dog brushed and relatively clean and don't worry about health issues, except to put the dog onto a routine deworming program and be very careful that the dog doesn't bring in ticks.
No, there is not "study after study showing that children exposed to dirt are less likely to develop allergies and they are more resistant to disease." This hygiene hypothesis has been around since 1989 and yet all the studies just say "needs more research". Here's a very good article about it complete with lots of references: News Feature: Cleaning up the hygiene hypothesis | PNAS
The hygiene hypothesis has been very much misinterpreted by the general public.

WRT dogs, I did a little research on this for an article I wrote about "pet therapy" for my church newsletter. There has never been a reported incident of an infection acquired from a therapy dog.


Quote:
Originally Posted by germaine2626 View Post
What? What? What? We must run in completely different circles. I'm a mother of two, grandmother of two with dozens and dozens of friends & relatives who have had children and I have never heard any new mother say that they were "bored out of their minds" during the first few weeks after having a baby. Too exhausted to take a shower, yes. Too busy to eat, yes. Too tired to get dressed, yes. No time to run errands, do laundry, buy groceries, yes. But, never so "bored" that they needed to find a hobby like training a dog. And, these were all two parent households. I would imagine that it would be much more exhausting and stressful for a single parent of a newborn.



Back to the regular thread.
Ditto! I remember when I had my first. I went to a lunch with my coworkers, and one of them asked me if I was bored. I said, certainly not in the sense of not having enough to do. Maybe I could have done with a little more adult stimulation, which I did get as time went on.
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