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Old 04-04-2018, 09:45 PM
 
25 posts, read 11,285 times
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Hi! Single parents out there... Do you have any advice on how to balance taking care of a new born baby and your dog?
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Old 04-04-2018, 10:43 PM
Status: "Choose life - support BSL" (set 29 days ago)
 
544 posts, read 128,904 times
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Do it together. Your dog needs plenty of exercise and structure if you want any sanity in the house. You need exercise to be able to keep your energy up and your sanity. The baby needs fresh air (even if it’s cold) and most go to sleep in the stroller. Put the baby in the stroller, grab the dog, and go for a couple of brisk 30 minute walks each day. The dog should be hoofing it, not sniffing and exploring. This will go a long way to keeping your dog calm and happy. In addition to that, teach your dog the “place” command if you haven’t already. Solidk9training on YouTube has some great videos on this. This will come in handy once the baby gets mobile, or even now when you don’t want the dog running under foot or waking the baby. Also make sure the dog is crate trained and that you utilize the crate. Teach your dog “leave it” if you haven’t already. This will prevent the dog from snatching up dropped pacifiers and dropped food and from taking food from the baby once it’s mobile. I’m sure it goes without saying to never leave the dog unattended with the baby and once the baby is mobile, do not let him crawl on the dog, lift its gums, pull its ears, ride or sit on it, etc. This is not cute and it is not safe.
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Old 04-04-2018, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
15,051 posts, read 14,342,914 times
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You may need to ask for help. Ask the baby's other parent, or other relatives, for more help. Ask your relatives for help. Pay someone, or ask friends, to walk the dog or watch the baby so that you can get a nap. Pay someone, or ask friends, to do the chores that need to done, such as grocery shopping or laundry or cleaning so that you can spend more time with your child.

I hate to be blunt but if you really, really can not handle caring for both at this time you may have to choose. Can your dog stay for a few weeks with a friend or in a kennel? I know it is not a great alternative but sometimes you need to do things that you do not want to do.

Also, if you have had the dog for a long time watch to make sure that he is not jealous of the time that you are with your baby or jealous if you hold your baby. That happened to friends of mine. Their very large dog originally seemed fine with the new baby until one day he started growling, snarling and snapping at the baby when he was in his bassinet. They needed to rehome the dog with relatives.

Good luck.
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Old 04-05-2018, 06:24 AM
 
2,139 posts, read 1,031,938 times
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Definitely take them for walks at the same time and make sure to give the dog attention too. Does the dog sleep with you? We found letting our dog sleep in the bed when our son was a newborn was great for her because she still got her one on one time. Of course my dog is quite spoiled lol. You might also want to look into doggy day camps or boarding the dog for a weekend just to get a break. Or hire a teenager to walk the dog occasionally so you can take a break maybe. Teenagers are usually cheap and will do it for far less than a. Professional. Overall just cut yourself some slack, realize it won’t be like this for long and hang in there. You can do this!!

The days are long but the years are short. Someone told me this when my son was a baby and I wanted to punch them at the time but it is so, so true.
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Old 04-05-2018, 08:08 AM
 
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If it isn't crate trained (the dog, not the baby ) I would get on that. I don't believe it is ever safe to leave a baby/toddler alone with a dog. I had 3 dogs when my kids were little. If I couldn't supervise directly, then the dogs were outside or crated. It wasn't hard once I got in to a pattern of it.
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Old 04-05-2018, 09:09 AM
Status: "Choose life - support BSL" (set 29 days ago)
 
544 posts, read 128,904 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sky2224 View Post
Hi! Single parents out there... Do you have any advice on how to balance taking care of a new born baby and your dog?
Also, if it is a breed famous for killing a human every couple of weeks without warning, provocation, or prior aggression (or a mix thereof), just get rid of it! It isn't worth the risk to your child. Also, remember your child is your child and your dog is your dog; they aren't siblings and the baby comes first. The dog needs its needs met for exercise, food, and attention, but no need to feel guilty if the dog has to take a backseat for awhile.
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Old 04-05-2018, 09:26 AM
 
529 posts, read 192,580 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OttoR View Post
Also, if it is a breed famous for killing a human every couple of weeks without warning, provocation, or prior aggression (or a mix thereof), just get rid of it! It isn't worth the risk to your child. Also, remember your child is your child and your dog is your dog; they aren't siblings and the baby comes first. The dog needs its needs met for exercise, food, and attention, but no need to feel guilty if the dog has to take a backseat for awhile.
Millions of children and dogs manage to coexist in the same household. As long as the OP can safely manage both, there's no reason for her to get rid of anything.
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Old 04-05-2018, 12:57 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
19,686 posts, read 23,363,727 times
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First thing, it won't take long for the dog to add the baby to his pack that he protects. Still, never leave a baby unsupervised with a dog, no matter how gentle the dog.

There is no reason to do anything special about the dog. The dog follows you around when you are holding, bathing, changing diapers. The dog is simply included. Talk to both the baby and the dog.

Walk the baby in a stroller and the dog on a leash. Make sure the dog gets plenty of attention. If your dog is allowed on the furniture, let the dog snuggle against you while you are holding or feeding the baby. That is bonding and will bond the child into the pack.

Once my son was crawling, his preferred place to sleep was curled up with the dog (not when there wasn't an adult supervising). Once the child was eating solid food, he was the dog's best friend as he dropped and flung food.

Start immediately with training the child how to treat the dog. Stop hitting. Teach the child how to pet. Teach the child that he can't crawl on top of the dog.

If the dog isn't already careful about taking treats, it is time to teach him.
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Old 04-05-2018, 01:03 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
19,686 posts, read 23,363,727 times
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Concerning "germs", there is study after study showing that children exposed to dirt are less likely to develop allergies and they are more resistant to disease.

I suggest that you keep the dog brushed and relatively clean and don't worry about health issues, except to put the dog onto a routine deworming program and be very careful that the dog doesn't bring in ticks.
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Old 04-05-2018, 01:11 PM
 
2,568 posts, read 829,075 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFlyingBird View Post
If it isn't crate trained (the dog, not the baby ) I would get on that. I don't believe it is ever safe to leave a baby/toddler alone with a dog. I had 3 dogs when my kids were little. If I couldn't supervise directly, then the dogs were outside or crated. It wasn't hard once I got in to a pattern of it.

And I think that's 90% of things. Those first 2 or 3 weeks of having a newborn are a little crazy, trying to figure out a routine, figuring out the baby's routine, etc.
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