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Old 04-06-2018, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Location: Location
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The advent of a new baby may be a good time for your very-close-to 3 y.o. to forego the afternoon nap so she can spend one-on-one time with Mommy and not feel displaced by the sibling. Getting her used to "quiet time" with a book and cuddling with Mom while the new baby naps may help to insure she is still valued as the Big Sister.

Of course, if she doesn't nap and ends up cranky by the end of the day, then she really does need the little sleep. Would it help to get a mat like she uses in day care and let her chill out on the floor? Could be she just doesn't like the idea of getting into bed midday.
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Old 04-06-2018, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Saint John, IN
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My first daughter stopped taking naps at 27 months, exactly when I had my second daughter! After a few weeks fighting with her to take a nap I gave up. She was out for the night at 7pm till 7-8am the next day and I was fine with that.


Guess what? My 2nd daughter also stopped taking naps right after she turned two. I decided to have them have quiet time instead of naps at that time. They would relax on the couch or in bed, but they needed to relax and be quiet for at least 30-60 minutes.
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Old 04-06-2018, 10:00 PM
 
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Change of habits tend to work.
Agree with the 'quiet time's. My son's were given a book to read. They both started reading at three. And up to their room they stayed. They'd quietly drift off. Some days they'd be coloring and the crayons would create new bed sheet designs. Sheets can be washed..no biggie.

My granddaughter has to have her lully music on ...it soothes her. And myself too some days!

Wish I could volunteer to nap for them...something I've yet to outgrow is afternoon naps. So invigorating! But my boss tends to frown on this idea ...
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Old 04-07-2018, 05:42 AM
 
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Back in the day my youngest two were two years apart. So, after the usual morning and play at home I used to walk with my kids to the park. Then back home for lunch and a bath....Then I would put both of them on my bed and read to them quietly and we all got a lil nap that way.

With your wife so near delivery she likely needs a good nap herself. You'll get a few ideas to try and If nothing else works perhaps your daughter should be in preschool at least a few days a week so that your wife can rest.

She definitely should be resting when your daughter is.....Tell her those dishes and laundry can wait.
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Old 04-07-2018, 06:49 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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My youngest two stopped napping around 2 years old (My oldest was even younger). As long as they're getting an adequate amount of sleep over night, a nap should no longer be mandatory.

I know some mothers who have been lucky enough to have 5 year olds that still nap, but that seems to be the exception.

I do agree with others about encouraging quiet time. That's a battle I personally lost but I do know other parents who were very successful with it.

Good luck!
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Old 04-07-2018, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Centre of the continent
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Quiet time worked for my daughter, who started not wanting to nap when she was just a little older than your daughter. Fortunately, mine was always a kid who would spend time playing alone, so having quiet time just made it a scheduled time to stay in her room with the door shut. Sometimes she fell asleep, sometimes we'd hear her playing. During the week, she stayed home with her dad who worked weird shifts, so he needed the nap time. I was home on weekends, and we kept the same schedule.

I did have friends in those days whose kids would in no way stay in their rooms like that, I recognize we were lucky in that way.
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Old 04-07-2018, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdieBelle View Post
You CAN establish "quiet time," where she may not have to go to sleep but she has to stay in her room doing quiet things. She should be able to obey that rule at her age, and it can be combined with the baby's arrival by stressing to her that "we all need to have quiet time ...."
I used to be one of those resistant nappers. I remember fighting it tooth and nail. Although according to my parents, I napped willingly until I was 3 or 4, then started it fighting it. They stopped trying to get me to nap entirely when I started first grade.

Regardless, I can say one thing: kids are much better mind-readers than parents give them credit for. In other words, they'll know that "quiet time", "rest hour", or whatever euphemism parents use, are thinly veiled code words for the same old boring nap time. Even if you tell them to just "lie in bed quietly for a while", you won't fool the kid. Especially if you won't let him/her get up. Bed = nap, plain and simple.

I suppose it's different when sleeping---oops, I mean "lying quietly in bed" ---isn't mandatory, but still. Kids are smart. They'll know. As a childfree person, I'm not sure what I can suggest. Maybe having the kid play with non-electronic, non-mechanized toys? Like, arranging blocks, moving toy cars around, or looking at picture books. No iPads, obviously. And call it "special toy time" or something.

Last edited by MillennialUrbanist; 04-07-2018 at 10:46 AM..
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Old 04-08-2018, 09:14 AM
 
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We switched from "nap time" to "quiet time". You can tell your daughter that since she is a big kid now, *she* can decide whether she wants to nap or play by herself in her room. But she needs to stay in her room, because mom needs a nap, even if she doesn't.

We have special quiet time toys, that only come out during quiet time, and are put away right after. I let my daughter pick two toys from the bin to play with. She'll usually play for a while and then drift off to nap. Quiet time for us is 30 min - one hour (if she naps too long she won't sleep at night, or wake super early).

*If you have trouble keeping her in her room, buy a door monkey (less than $20 on Amazon).

Best wishes.
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Old 04-08-2018, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
Regardless, I can say one thing: kids are much better mind-readers than parents give them credit for. In other words, they'll know that "quiet time", "rest hour", or whatever euphemism parents use, are thinly veiled code words for the same old boring nap time.
Parents know this. It's not "fooling" the kid. You're giving them a choice, but it's still a choice between activities the parent selects for them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
As a childfree person, I'm not sure what I can suggest.
Exactly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
And call it "special toy time" or something.
So ... a ... euphemism for "quiet time."
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Old 04-08-2018, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
2,964 posts, read 1,219,637 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdieBelle View Post
Parents know this. It's not "fooling" the kid. You're giving them a choice, but it's still a choice between activities the parent selects for them.
Choice? You mean like voting for _____ or _______ in the 2020 election? Where the "choice" is a big illusion, and we're screwed no matter who wins.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdieBelle View Post
So ... a ... euphemism for "quiet time."
I know that. But "special toy time" is more difficult for the kid to figure out than "quiet time", because he/she will be thrown off by the word "toy". At least until he/she learns the truth. But I rest my case at this point. <shrug>
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