U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-25-2018, 12:51 PM
 
Location: NYC area
495 posts, read 372,484 times
Reputation: 820

Advertisements

Just to allay your fears, I grew up in a low/no TV household and was never exposed to cable tv or video games until college. Although I enjoyed certain shows at that age, it never had the big draw for me compared to some of my friends that grew up watching tons of TV and had a huge arsenal of shows they followed. After I moved out on my own, I went many years before ever paying for cable tv.

Also--I guess their tendency to "go nuts" on screentime will depend a lot on on their personality overall. If they've developed a lot of non-screen-related hobbies, they probably won't spend that much time on screens in college either, between the hobbies and studies.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-25-2018, 12:55 PM
 
35,121 posts, read 37,679,734 times
Reputation: 61828
Our Grandsons get screen time on Saturday night 2 hours before bed.
Otherwise no screen time, they are 14 and 13 and it has not hurt them a bit.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2018, 01:07 PM
 
1,263 posts, read 3,649,723 times
Reputation: 771
Ha! I read the thread title as "SCREAM TIME!" You can see how things go in my household!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2018, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Northern Maine
9,468 posts, read 14,257,577 times
Reputation: 8864
My sons came home from school and each hooked up a sled dog team. They ran the teams, unharnessed the dogs, took care of the harnesses and sleds, fed and watered the dogs and cleaned the dog yards. Then it was supper and study. We did not watch much TV. My younger son was the only student ever to go to school here with a sled dog team. Other students come to school by snowmobile, ski plane, float plane, boat, dirt bike or ATV depending on the season. Just before the ice goes off the lakes, like right now, we used to send a teacher out to a remote lake for a few weeks until the students could resume coming to the bus by boat. In the winter, the bus driver makes sure all the snowmobiles start before she leaves so no kid left behind freezes to death. Up here, "No Child Left Behind" has a different meaning than it does at the Department of Education in Washington, DC.

Say, did you ever notice the the Department of Education in Washington, DC, with their billions of dollars, operates no schools and teaches no students?

Our sons are both engineers and employed. I still work because I like the work.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2018, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Texas
595 posts, read 472,800 times
Reputation: 1806
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrooklynDad85 View Post
Thanks, Jayerdu. I think my son may have a lot in common with yours. You think the key difference between your oldest son and your sister's was the weekday video games
I really do. My sister worked. So, when my nephew came home he would go straight to his PC and play. Five to 10 minutes before she got home, he would begin homework. After dinner, he would play again until he was forced to go to bed. He is a brilliant kid but did just average in school, got into an average school, lives at home working an average job and still playing games after work. Itís sad. My sister 100% regrets that she wasnít more strict.

Also, since I implemented the no tablet rule during weekends, my son no longer rushes through life - things like eating, homework, cleaning, etc. He is more attentive when someone is talking to him. He also goes out to play more.

At first when we implemented the new rule, he didnít know what to do - he would linger around by walking around the house or laying on the couch, or bugging me. It took a while to adjust (about 2 weeks) but he doesnít even think about it anymore. He does his homework, he goes out to play or does his puzzles or plays with his siblings. Itís been about 4 months.

Oh yeah, my son is in the 5th grade as well. This is the milestone year where we live as this is the first year that students are ďtrackedĒ into classes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2018, 06:33 AM
 
624 posts, read 441,416 times
Reputation: 1141
I have a 9yo. At our school they are really pro-electronics and hand kids unmonitored ipads in Kindergarten and laptops in 4th grade. It has been AWFUL. The teachers let the kids have game time when they are "done" with their work. With 25 kids to monitor this has meant that there is very little oversight as to the quality of the "done" work. My kid would FLY through each and every task just to get to the ipad on the other side. I had to request that he not be allowed electronic access in his school downtime because it was affecting his performance. We have no electronics during the school week at home, why does he get it at school?! So I definitely sympathize. Maybe 30min to get it out of his system when he comes home and then that is it, and on to homework?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-27-2018, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
48 posts, read 22,552 times
Reputation: 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayerdu View Post
I really do. My sister worked. So, when my nephew came home he would go straight to his PC and play. Five to 10 minutes before she got home, he would begin homework. After dinner, he would play again until he was forced to go to bed. He is a brilliant kid but did just average in school, got into an average school, lives at home working an average job and still playing games after work. Itís sad. My sister 100% regrets that she wasnít more strict.

Also, since I implemented the no tablet rule during weekends, my son no longer rushes through life - things like eating, homework, cleaning, etc. He is more attentive when someone is talking to him. He also goes out to play more.

At first when we implemented the new rule, he didnít know what to do - he would linger around by walking around the house or laying on the couch, or bugging me. It took a while to adjust (about 2 weeks) but he doesnít even think about it anymore. He does his homework, he goes out to play or does his puzzles or plays with his siblings. Itís been about 4 months.

Oh yeah, my son is in the 5th grade as well. This is the milestone year where we live as this is the first year that students are ďtrackedĒ into classes.
Thanks Jayerdu, I appreciate your sharing. I've had my son go completely cold turkey a couple of times in the past when he's been begging for screen time (I took it as a sign that he's been getting too much of it already) and it's worked well after the first couple of weeks. Yours is a very encouraging story.


SalamanderSmile - Wow, you must have a well funded school district! Haha. For some reason these districts think electronics are a good idea, that video games will somehow prepare them for the future. I hope one of these days they'll wake up and see what's happening. There's a big difference between setting up the kids with lessons in programming for beginners and giving them unmonitored access to iPads and laptops.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2018, 09:19 PM
 
Location: The point of no return, er, NorCal
6,855 posts, read 4,197,679 times
Reputation: 8788
We're pretty breezy on screen time. Older kids are expected to complete schoolwork and nightly reading (we assign it) and then they're free to do whatever. Our older two don't play video games as much as they used to. They either continue reading, watch anime and other streaming shows, draw, write, play coding games, study, sing to the Hamilton soundtrack. Their go-to activities reflect their personality.

Mu husband and I play video games with the older kids when we have the time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-01-2018, 06:40 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn
48 posts, read 22,552 times
Reputation: 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphysique View Post
Mu husband and I play video games with the older kids when we have the time.
That's another part of it. I tend to think that screen time is more acceptable if they're sharing it with someone else in person, like if my son and I are playing a game together, or we're watching a movie together as a family. It just seems more like personal bonding time that way. Maybe I'm kidding myself
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-02-2018, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
1,419 posts, read 3,865,330 times
Reputation: 867
OP, set the boundaries up front, a lot easier to relax the limits later than to enforce the rules once he's used to all that screen time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:03 PM.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top