U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-04-2018, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Texas
3,406 posts, read 2,492,422 times
Reputation: 5394

Advertisements

I found this CDC chart that shows the leading causes of death in the U.S. broken down by age group. Suicide is #2 on the list for the every age range between 10-34 years old, which includes the majority of childbearing years. So, the fact that suicide is #2 for new mothers is perhaps not all that surprising, which isn't to say that the recognition and treatment of postpartum depression is not important.

https://www.cdc.gov/injury/images/lc..._1056w814h.gif
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-04-2018, 08:59 AM
 
4,786 posts, read 2,825,310 times
Reputation: 11583
Thanks for posting that list. Interesting that "Complicated pregnancy" appears as #10 on the list for both the 15-24 and 25-34 age groups, but they comprised only a total of 656 deaths in the whole year.

That is still too many, but it makes me wonder about whether the leading cause of death for postpartum mothers is really being "birth complications from lack of prenatal care."

The overall #2 cause for the 15-34 age groups, suicide, involved 13,000 deaths. Isn't #1 for new mothers, as for everyone, more likely to be "unintentional injury" (37,000 total deaths)?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2018, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Texas
3,406 posts, read 2,492,422 times
Reputation: 5394
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Thanks for posting that list. Interesting that "Complicated pregnancy" appears as #10 on the list for both the 15-24 and 25-34 age groups, but they comprised only a total of 656 deaths in the whole year.

That is still too many, but it makes me wonder about whether the leading cause of death for postpartum mothers is really being "birth complications from lack of prenatal care."

The overall #2 cause for the 15-34 age groups, suicide, involved 13,000 deaths. Isn't #1 for new mothers, as for everyone, more likely to be "unintentional injury" (37,000 total deaths)?
Thanks. I think the chart is concise and informative, and I like how it includes both rank and total numbers. Interesting how it isn't until the older age groups that heart disease and neoplasms become such prevalent killers, but look how large the numbers are.

I assume "unintentional injury" is a large catch-all category that includes any and all trauma, which statistically speaking, is still a young person's game.

To make more sense of this article and what it truly means, I would want to know of the total population that commits suicide, what percentage of them were new mothers (having delivered within the past 6-12 months). My guess is it's still a rather small subset of that population.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2018, 09:19 AM
 
4,186 posts, read 1,614,147 times
Reputation: 12330
What a confusing/somewhat unhelpful chart. It seems like a lot of things are purposely lumped together, or purposely separated for the purpose of obfuscating.

Since "unintentional injury" ranks very high, it would be very interesting to see that broken down by:

car crashes
accidental falls
heavy machinery
etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2018, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Texas
3,406 posts, read 2,492,422 times
Reputation: 5394
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
What a confusing/somewhat unhelpful chart. It seems like a lot of things are purposely lumped together, or purposely separated for the purpose of obfuscating.

Since "unintentional injury" ranks very high, it would be very interesting to see that broken down by:

car crashes
accidental falls
heavy machinery
etc.
I find the chart pretty straightforward, but at one page, I think it's just supposed to be a broad overview. I agree it would be interesting to see things further broken down. An interactive chart where you could drill down and see what comprises the Unintentional injury or Neoplasms, for instance.

Last edited by Texas Ag 93; 05-04-2018 at 10:46 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2018, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
83,037 posts, read 95,670,363 times
Reputation: 29580
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
What a confusing/somewhat unhelpful chart. It seems like a lot of things are purposely lumped together, or purposely separated for the purpose of obfuscating.

Since "unintentional injury" ranks very high, it would be very interesting to see that broken down by:

car crashes
accidental falls
heavy machinery
etc.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas Ag 93 View Post
I find the chart pretty straightforward, but at one page, I think it's just supposed to be a broad overview. I agree it would be interesting to see things further broken down. An interactive chart where you could drill down and see what comprises the Unintentional injury or Neoplasms, for instance.
Totally agree. And the CDC has a huge website (not too user friendly if you ask me, but they didn't) where one can find more stats.

Unintentional injury, as you guessed, ClaraC, means "accidents". There are many, many kids of accidents; I probably don't have to tell you that. Motor-vehicle accidents, auto-pedestrian accidents, other transportation accidents (bikes, motorcycles, horses, what have you), farm machinery accidents, drownings, fires, the list is endless. Most of these categories can be further broken down, actually. Congenital anomalies-which ones?; short gestation-how short?; maternal pregnancy complications-which ones?; etc.

The list is not meant to be deliberately obfuscating; don't know why you'd think that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2018, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Greater LA area
14,987 posts, read 10,764,597 times
Reputation: 28262
I bet this is another mostly American thing.
Americans generally work too many hours, are always under pressure, not many vacation/sick days + processed foods = unhealthy overall.


Americans are depressed like no other nation is - everyone is on pills and has a therapist.
Then they have children and get overwhelmed because a) they are already prone to depression and b) they get no real break from work. New mothers are expected to go back to work fulltime. Other nations give new moms an often even paid break and the government supports them. I am surprised so many Americans even have children on top of their (exhausting) jobs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2018, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Sugarland
12,427 posts, read 10,937,223 times
Reputation: 13737
Quote:
Originally Posted by oh-eve View Post
I bet this is another mostly American thing.
Americans generally work too many hours, are always under pressure, not many vacation/sick days + processed foods = unhealthy overall.


Americans are depressed like no other nation is - everyone is on pills and has a therapist.
Then they have children and get overwhelmed because a) they are already prone to depression and b) they get no real break from work. New mothers are expected to go back to work fulltime. Other nations give new moms an often even paid break and the government supports them. I am surprised so many Americans even have children on top of their (exhausting) jobs.
Definitely. My job isnít even that demanding compared to some others and I only work 40 hours a week, but I still donít feel like I have enough time to myself. I canít really imagine throwing a kid into the mix.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2018, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
12,197 posts, read 6,670,020 times
Reputation: 25903
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
What is your source for that?
https://www.npr.org/2017/05/12/52780...moms-in-danger
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2018, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Queens, New Yawk
8,382 posts, read 4,405,489 times
Reputation: 13269
Quote:
Originally Posted by oh-eve View Post
I bet this is another mostly American thing.
Americans generally work too many hours, are always under pressure, not many vacation/sick days + processed foods = unhealthy overall.


Americans are depressed like no other nation is - everyone is on pills and has a therapist.
Then they have children and get overwhelmed because a) they are already prone to depression and b) they get no real break from work. New mothers are expected to go back to work fulltime. Other nations give new moms an often even paid break and the government supports them. I am surprised so many Americans even have children on top of their (exhausting) jobs.
That could be part of it. But even new moms who don’t need to return to work are susceptible if they don’t have a good support system in place. I remember after my third baby, I was in a really bad place. I was a SAHM, overwhelmed every moment of ever day. Two kids was a breeze for me, but something about adding a third to the mix pushed me over the edge, and I had deteriorated to the point where I didn’t even know how to ask for help; it was easier to just be alone. By 4 months in, I knew I was a danger to myself, but you’d be surprised at how medical providers don’t take it seriously and just chalk it up to “baby blues”. I was literally sobbing, begging my kids’ doctor for drugs; anything to feel just better enough to be an adequate mother.

Contrast that with what I observe in my neighborhood of predominantly immigrant families: it is customary for expectant parents to fly in their parents from overseas to stay for a few months to help take care of the new baby and the mom while the husband returns to work. Imagine have 3 or 4 sets of grownup hands at all times, so the new Mom can heal and rest!? That’s what we get wrong: in the US, Mom is often an afterthought from the moment of birth.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top