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Old 05-08-2018, 03:55 PM
 
Location: East Coast
2,951 posts, read 1,725,823 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lologal321 View Post
'when my husband and I were 25, we were newly out of law school, had terrible jobs, and literally had no money. I don't know how we could have ever taken care of a kid'

I had to roll my eyes at this a bit. Oh you poor thing. You AND your HUSBAND BOTH out of LAW SCHOOL. WAAH! Do you know how much better off you were at 25 than many people having children in the world? Damn, this might the first world problems post of the year. Congratulations for not getting pregnant in such a dire situation i guess, lol.
Well, okay. But the situation isn't that different for anyone who is 20 or 25 who has a terrible job with no benefits and little salary. The point was, when we were 25, we had no money. There are plenty of people who are in their twenties who have no money. Some are Ph.D's. (There are actually Ph.D's who receive food stamps). So, yeah, we were lucky in that we got to be students for a few years more than other people. But that isn't really relevant to the fact that we couldn't afford to have a baby at 25.
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Old 05-08-2018, 06:28 PM
 
5,472 posts, read 2,475,672 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
I think she was referring to the fact that the children of older men are also more likely to have certain ailments.



My much younger sister (2 weeks younger than my daughter) was born perfectly healthy despite the fact she had a mother of "advanced maternal age" and a father nearly 60. Having a aunt/niece pair of the same age was not quite the burden you present it as. At most it was an topic of momentary interest.

As for the notion that a particular child's ailments would not exist if mom was younger, that is just not factually true. They might have been less likely, but the idea that "none of these would have occurred" is just plain old not true.
Care to retract that statement?
Downs syndrome statistics don't lie. Neither do all the documented medical research on the higher risks as ladies age . I respect that your family adjusted so well and welcomed the sibling.
Your right it wasn't a burden, it was an observation. Good eye
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Old 05-08-2018, 06:36 PM
 
Location: Florida
4,872 posts, read 3,358,711 times
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My husband is four months younger than his aunt. His aunt is healthy and his grandmother is a spry woman and proud to tell people that at 86 years old, the only prescription she takes is eye drops for her dry eyes. She still drives and travels and is up at 6:00 am with her shoes on ready to start the work of the day. She’s incredible and I hope I’m so sturdy and active well into my 80s! Maybe having a houseful of kids (she has 6) and having her last during middle age helped to keep her young.

But my husband’s grandmother having a healthy baby at 45 doesn’t negate the risks of birth defects in babies born to older mothers. Most will be born healthy, but it’s definitely a consideration.
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Old 05-08-2018, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
19,954 posts, read 10,849,428 times
Reputation: 29454
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nov3 View Post
Care to retract that statement?
Downs syndrome statistics don't lie. Neither do all the documented medical research on the higher risks as ladies age . I respect that your family adjusted so well and welcomed the sibling.
Your right it wasn't a burden, it was an observation. Good eye
Down syndrome statistics are that in terms of pure numbers, more babies with DS are born to younger mothers, not older ones.

Quote:
Maternal age is the only factor that has been linked to an increased chance of having a baby with Down syndrome resulting from nondisjunction or mosaicism. However, due to higher birth rates in younger women, 80% of children with Down syndrome are born to women under 35 years of age.
https://www.ndss.org/about-down-syndrome/down-syndrome/
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Old 05-08-2018, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,982 posts, read 100,753,158 times
Reputation: 32388
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnotherTouchOfWhimsy View Post
My husband is four months younger than his aunt. His aunt is healthy and his grandmother is a spry woman and proud to tell people that at 86 years old, the only prescription she takes is eye drops for her dry eyes. She still drives and travels and is up at 6:00 am with her shoes on ready to start the work of the day. Sheís incredible and I hope Iím so sturdy and active well into my 80s! Maybe having a houseful of kids (she has 6) and having her last during middle age helped to keep her young.

But my husbandís grandmother having a healthy baby at 45 doesnít negate the risks of birth defects in babies born to older mothers. Most will be born healthy, but itís definitely a consideration.
There is a risk of birth defects no matter what the age of the PARENTS, not just the mother. Take a look at the links that have been posted.

Some birth defects are not age-related. Older moms are more at risk for birth defects caused by chromosomes, e.g. Down Syndrome. However, older moms are at lower risk for some other birth defects, such as brain, kidney and abdominal wall defects. Heart defect risk is about the same regardless of age. As for chromosome defects, amniocentesis and even chorionic villus sampling have been around for decades.


https://www.acog.org/Patients/FAQs/H...y-After-Age-35
https://www.webmd.com/baby/news/2014...irth-defects#2
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Old 05-08-2018, 09:34 PM
 
28,666 posts, read 25,456,431 times
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I was talking to a neonatal ICU nurse just a few days ago and she said they have a lot of moms aged 45 and up.
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Old 05-08-2018, 10:07 PM
 
5,975 posts, read 3,686,553 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
I was talking to a neonatal ICU nurse just a few days ago and she said they have a lot of moms aged 45 and up.
That doesn't mean anything unless you have the full story--the percentage of NICU infants who have mothers in each age group, and the reasons for their being in the NICU. One reason might be that older women often use IVF to get pregnant, and for that reason have a higher chance of giving birth to multiples who may be small and need to spend a little time in the NICU.

But I was only 30 when my first child was born, she was full term and weighed 8 1/2 lbs, and she was still in the NICU for three days. My babies born when I was 33 and 35 did not need the NICU. Go figure.
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Old 05-09-2018, 08:35 AM
 
126 posts, read 73,734 times
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Down syndrome statistics are that in terms of pure numbers, more babies with DS are born to younger mothers, not older ones.

That's because in general more younger mothers (women in 20s and 30s) are having babies.
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Old 05-09-2018, 08:38 AM
 
126 posts, read 73,734 times
Reputation: 217
Default re

Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
I was talking to a neonatal ICU nurse just a few days ago and she said they have a lot of moms aged 45 and up.
yes when i had my son at 35 my nurse made a comment about me being young. I said, young really? she said oh we have a lot of mothers older then you. I said over 40? and she said yes

I live in boston. I think a lot of people here put career first so that pushes things up, also a good portion of liberal eccentrics with money who feel they can do what they want and a good amount of gay people having kids as well as older ages.

I think the demographic of women having kids older in a larger metropolitan city is bound to be greater than a smaller city in south dakota or wyoming.
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Old 05-09-2018, 09:14 AM
Status: "Nope. I won't apologize." (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
8,013 posts, read 2,999,061 times
Reputation: 16942
Quote:
Originally Posted by lologal321 View Post
Down syndrome statistics are that in terms of pure numbers, more babies with DS are born to younger mothers, not older ones.

That's because in general more younger mothers (women in 20s and 30s) are having babies.
I think that older moms are more likely to get amniocentesis and other prenatal testing to check for Down Syndrome and then abort if that is found. Many young moms may not think about the risk of Down Syndrome at all. So it makes sense that there is a higher rate of DS births in younger moms.


It is still not known entirely whether DS and other chromosomal abnormalities are caused by sperm or egg.
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