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Old 05-10-2018, 07:53 PM
 
889 posts, read 1,089,585 times
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Having a child who did 30+ flights in his first year of life, including international routes, I can say a couple things with pretty good authority:
1. Don't stress about going on a plane with your infant. Babies cry and as long as you are attentive to your child's needs, that all that matters. Most passengers are understanding of your situation as many of them have kids of their own.
2. Rotate through enjoyable activities that appropriate for your child's age. Our son loved to be read books at that age and I literally did that an entire flight once.
3. Screens are okay to use, but they don't work well on children that young. They just don't have the attention span to look at a screen for more than a few minutes. An iPad is a good distraction if need it for a short time, but don't depend on it. Ignore the unwanted advise from CraigCreek about screen time. Thats not the purpose of this thread and how you choose to raise your child is your choice and shouldn't be judged.
4. Schedule flights to correspond with naps or sleeping time.
5. Frequent snacks eat up time.
6. If your child is walking and the seatbelt sign is off, take excursions in the aisle and allow them to walk with assistance to the back of the plane and back to your seat. It breaks up the lap time.
7. If you child is >18 months old, buy a seat for them and use their car seat. Its very hard to hold a child of that age on a flight that is longer than 60 minutes.
8. Chewing snacks / bottles / pacifier during landing. My son never had an issue with his ears on takeoff.
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Old 05-10-2018, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
7,946 posts, read 4,802,282 times
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To late to help the OP, but I have seen a video from a pediatrician advising tight swaddling to calm travelling babies.
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Old 05-10-2018, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
83,099 posts, read 95,772,999 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
Hey, cool down! No need to be insulting. My post about the inappropriateness of iPads for babies and very small children was not directed at you personally, yet I seem to have hit a very hot button. Goodness.

That plane's already flown. Let it go. Obviously it's not going to make a huge difference in the fate of the world - or even one baby - if said baby is given an iPad while in flight.

But I think of at least a dozen other things which would be more appropriate and more productive for that child to receive in that circumstance.

Working in a pediatrician's office is not the same as conducting scientific research. But, just in case you are a pediatrician, I expect you'd agree that if a parent is introducing an iPad or similar device to a 13 month old baby for the first time, a plane trip is hardly the ideal setting in which to do it.

Or, if said infant is already accustomed to an iPad, you'd agree that limiting that infant's exposure is in his or her best interest, as you already noted this. A baby's brain is still very malleable at this age, and he or she deserves more than an iPad.

Look, I AM a professional with many years of working with small children and families. The problem is not so much screen-devices such as iPads - it's the over use of such things to babysit and to placate small children, often to the detriment of personal one on one (or one on two, or even three or four, if you have several small children) time spent with and attention paid to the child or children, minus such devices.

Children who are not exposed to these things but who DO benefit by having parents or other caregivers reading to and involving them in the picture books, reciting nursery rhymes and singing to them, talking and engaging with them about everyday activities, etc. acquire both receptive and expressive language more rapidly, have larger vocabularies at an earlier age, and are more attached to their parents. It's not hard to figure out why.

They're also more creative, more imaginative, tend to have longer attention spans,and are often more academically successful than are many little ones left to the tender mercies of the iPad. They know how to interact with people and how to use their imaginations from early ages, not just interact with iPads and play the already in place games and other activities offered therein.

IPads are not comparable to traditional wind-up toys at all. Those have been around for centuries, and they can provide small muscle exercise and some degree of creativity. Nonetheless, the best, most creative toys remain those non-mechanical toys which engage the child's creative imagination and do not impose limited activities upon him or her.

Usually these toys have stood the test of time, and understandably so. They work: wooden blocks. Little red wagons. Rocking horses. Picture books. Dolls. Dollhouses. Toy stoves and refrigerators, toy pots and pans and dishes. Toy trains and cars and trucks and boats. Stuffed toys. Modeling clay. Tinker-Toys. Lincoln Logs. Balls. Sand-pails and shovels (and a sandpile or table for digging and building). Toy pianos and rhythm band instruments. Tricycles and bicycles and scooters. Crayons. Finger paints. Poster paints. Things that stimulate the imagination and don't limit it.

If you're not familiar with the Waldorf or Montessori educational philosophies and practices (I expect you are), check them out. No iPads in either. Again, time tested.

Meanwhile, I hope the OP and her family are having a pleasant flight.
Right. Here's what you said: "You can't survive with a small child for two hours without an iPad??

Wow, wonder how earlier generations ever managed to raise their kids to adulthood?"


Who did you mean by "you" if not me, especially as you quoted my post? Then the snark of asking me how earlier generations managed to raise their kids to adulthood, assuming I have little children, or maybe none.

Funny of you to say that! That's what I said to begin with!

I am aware that many people think pediatricians are "dumb" and no, I'm not one. I'm a pediatric nurse, even worse, right?

Presumably since the mother said she was going to bring it, the child has used it before.

Get off the soapbox.

Right. All those would be perfectly appropriate for a plane trip. I especially like the idea of a rhythm band.

Montessori has its critics and Waldorf even moreso. Times change. We are not Amish.
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Old 05-10-2018, 08:44 PM
 
23,493 posts, read 30,091,952 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CincyExpert View Post
After completing a short roundtrip to see my parents around Xmas time (on the plane for a little over 2 hours each way), we're making the same trip this evening and hoping for better results.

Our first trip saw mixed results (slept for 90% of first flight, screamed for over 50% of 2nd flight) and I'd like to see what advice experienced parents had for dealing with their own babies on the plane.

Our little one will be sitting on our lap for the flight but hates to sit on our lap in general and is typically very squirmy and loud when he's in an uncomfortable position.

Some things we'll be trying to make the flight easier...

-trying to keep him up during the afternoon so he avoids his 2nd nap and is more tired later on
-bottle feed him during the flight's ascension and descension
-Ipad with his favorite sing-a-longs downloaded
-Ibuprofen and Orajel before the flight (teething)

Thanks for all suggestions in advance!
My son took his first plane ride at 8 weeks old. When we got up to deplane, folks were completely surprised that I had a newborn with me. He never made a sound. Slept most of the 2 hours, and had a bottle the rest of the time. He was always a quiet one.
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Old 05-10-2018, 08:46 PM
 
23,493 posts, read 30,091,952 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Axxlrod View Post
How wonderful for all the people around you to have to listen to kid's sing-a-longs.

I get that you're trying to keep your baby from screaming like he did before, but forcing the people around you to listen to kid's music is just as bad.
I agree with that. I'd lose my mind if I had to listen to that on a plane. No noisy gadgets please.
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Old 05-10-2018, 09:34 PM
 
Location: State of Denial
1,436 posts, read 615,884 times
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Two words: Goldfish crackers. Works every time. Make them work for them. Hide them in your hand or under a magazine.


If you're really desperate, stickers. Don't let them put them on the tray table. Let them put them on YOU....your arms, your hands, your shirt. My daughter, granddaughter and great-granddaughter LOVED putting stickers on themselves and other people. We could usually get a good hour out of that.
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Old 05-10-2018, 09:54 PM
 
4,289 posts, read 5,847,414 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
I agree with getting him a seat of his own, and providing a box of fun toys. I would even bring a carry on box, and every 15 minutes or so he gets to open a new toy - like dollar store stuff, or maybe it would be a wrapped snack.

I would be wary of too many meds - those packages say "may cause excitability, especially in children" for a reason.
Oh yes. I gave my now 30year old some Benadryl when she was a toddler as we were driving thru the night. It had the reverse effect and she was WILD.

Iíd buy the baby a seat.. Itís far safer as well as easier. Personally I donít think they should allow lap babies.
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Old 05-11-2018, 12:13 AM
 
1,394 posts, read 510,937 times
Reputation: 1678
13 month old baby? You need to entertain. Bring some books to read.
A friend introduced me to those Velcro books where you pull off items and put them back on. You can let him stand at your feet, hold his hands near your lap. Play peek a boo with a blanket.

On one airplane ride my husband let our toddler wander around near the restrooms. I don't know if the flight attendants will let you do that anymore.

For example: Search for soft cloth books, ones with texture. Learning books.
There are also books with hand gestures. Like patty cake.. .
If your son is good with books you could try a surprise with a pop up book:

The Color Monster: A Pop-Up Book of Feelings
by Anna Llenas (Hardcover) LOVE this one. I want to get my own copy.

Coloring books and a crayon or two.

Last edited by Sollaces; 05-11-2018 at 12:58 AM..
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Old 05-11-2018, 05:42 AM
 
3,337 posts, read 5,609,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
I agree with that. I'd lose my mind if I had to listen to that on a plane. No noisy gadgets please.
So bring your own music and headphones and you won't have to listen. Babies crying or singing kids songs are not the only bothersome people on a plane. Thinking groups of teens on school trips, the noise of shouting back and forth-across the aisle, laughing loudly, teasing each other continuously, doing a million selfies with friends, etc. I also used get annoyed with seatmates trying to talk to me or the business guys traveling with other business associates either talking business loudly or bragging about how well they do. Ear buds solve the problem. Also bring some and chill.
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Old 05-11-2018, 10:13 AM
 
23,493 posts, read 30,091,952 times
Reputation: 27707
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rabflmom View Post
So bring your own music and headphones and you won't have to listen. Babies crying or singing kids songs are not the only bothersome people on a plane. Thinking groups of teens on school trips, the noise of shouting back and forth-across the aisle, laughing loudly, teasing each other continuously, doing a million selfies with friends, etc. I also used get annoyed with seatmates trying to talk to me or the business guys traveling with other business associates either talking business loudly or bragging about how well they do. Ear buds solve the problem. Also bring some and chill.
Nope. No way do I need to bring headphones. And not that it matters, but I can’t wear earbuds or most headphones. To think that I should subject myself to severe physical discomfort because of your lack of manners is absurd. I can deal with a crying baby on a plane- no issues at all as that is completely different. But to purposely subject people to a device noise such as that, is beyond rude. You need the chill, and manners too apparently. Not I.

Last edited by ChessieMom; 05-11-2018 at 10:31 AM..
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