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Old 05-11-2018, 01:47 PM
 
5,001 posts, read 4,807,097 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
Here's my 3 year old's sample daily menu (from yesterday):

Breakfast: cheese omelet, apple, chicken sausage

Morning snack: peanut butter on 9 grain bread

Lunch: chicken breast, carrots, steamed broccoli

Afternoon snack: cucumber, bell pepper, raisins, string cheese

Dinner: whole grain spaghetti with grass-fed ground beef, yogurt, pomegranate, mixed veggies

Drinks water.
I wish I were your 3 yr old.
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Old 05-11-2018, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
7,047 posts, read 2,187,251 times
Reputation: 9541
Quote:
Originally Posted by ceiligrrl View Post
try to feed a child fresh fruit, fresh veggies (make it fun, ants on a log/celery/raisins/cream cheese) ....... try to avoid highly processed foods, canned foods are usually high in sodium and have too many preservatives....... as a grandma i stay out of the aisles, where all the unhealthy food are and have too much sugar, stay away from over processed white breads and instead use a whole grain bread for sandwiches, my grandkids get dave's killer bread, natural peanut butter or cream cheese with a no sugar added jelly sandwich. feed a child from the perimeter of a grocery store and read the labels carefully in the processed meats dept..... and really? read those yogurt labels, yogurt is often very very high in sugar, there are healthier kinds like Siggi's.

You obviously think that this is a healthy diet and many years ago, I might have agreed. But here's my improved formula that varies a good deal from yours:

I eat no grain products, as they contain huge amounts of carbohydrates and modern strains of wheat are loaded with chemicals they are bred to produce, that fight off insects and things like molds and fungus. These chemicals increase the crop yields and profits for farmers, but are not good for people. If you teach kids to eat a lot of grain-based foods, such as bread or pasta, they most likely will continue doing that, as adults.

Dairy products naturally contain a lot of sodium, but cheese of most kinds, has much more added.

Most peanut butter has a lot of added sodium, but there are a few brands that offer a no-salt-added option. When I buy canned vegetables or tomato sauce, I always get the no-salt-added versions. If you eat frozen green peas, some stores have a choice, with no added salt.

I have developed a taste for nonfat, plain yogurt and eat a pint per day, often mixed in hot dishes, instead of sour cream or in salads, instead of mayonnaise, supplemented by fresh lemon or lime juice. Some brands contain several kinds of unhealthy preservatives. The brand I usually buy, has nothing but nonfat milk and the bacterial culture. To my surprise, the store brand of nonfat, plain yogurt they sell at Walmart, has no other additives except pectin, a natural thickener, made from apples, citrus peels or other fruits and sometimes, corn.

Processed meats contain very unhealthy chemicals and the proteins in them have been degraded to the point of having very little good food value. Pickled Polish sausages eaten by beer-drinkers at taverns, are providing them with some entertainment, but little usable protein.
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Old 05-11-2018, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Texas
42,173 posts, read 49,655,265 times
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Yeah.
Watch out for the sugar in yogurts.
Kids shouldn't get more than 11gms of added sugar a day, and one yogurt can have twice that.
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Old 05-11-2018, 08:29 PM
 
126 posts, read 63,514 times
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I have a hard time getting my almost 4 year old to eat vegetables. Fruits are a struggle too. Smoothies worked well for a while.

my 2 year old loves fruits and veggies...it depends on the kid.
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Old 05-14-2018, 11:22 AM
 
6,116 posts, read 5,137,758 times
Reputation: 8339
Quote:
Originally Posted by ceiligrrl View Post
try to feed a child fresh fruit, fresh veggies (make it fun, ants on a log/celery/raisins/cream cheese) ....... try to avoid highly processed foods, canned foods are usually high in sodium and have too many preservatives....... as a grandma i stay out of the aisles, where all the unhealthy food are and have too much sugar, stay away from over processed white breads and instead use a whole grain bread for sandwiches, my grandkids get dave's killer bread, natural peanut butter or cream cheese with a no sugar added jelly sandwich. feed a child from the perimeter of a grocery store and read the labels carefully in the processed meats dept..... and really? read those yogurt labels, yogurt is often very very high in sugar, there are healthier kinds like Siggi's.
Ants on a log! How could I forget that one! My version that my grandson loves is a banana, sliced in half (the log), with sugar free all natural peanut, cashew, or almond butter spread on it, topped with blueberries (the ants). Another breakfast favorite is "toad in a hole"...a slice of bread with a "hole" made with a cookie cutter (a star, heart, butterfly, etc.), spread with butter both sides and put in a frying pan. Then I break the egg over the "hole", and cook until the yoke is firm. Turn it over, the egg is in the shape of the cookie cutter.

My DD doesn't allow her kids to have processed foods, and their diet is meatless, organic, and mostly sugar free. She feeds them organic spelt bread, organic cheese, organic greek yogurt, free range eggs, steel cut oats, and organic produce (we grow an organic vegetable garden in the summer, and she belongs to a local co-op). Four-year-old has never been to McDonalds, or tasted a chicken nugget. I always babysit at their place, and DD has all the food on hand...she owns a health food/supplement business, so it's always easily available.

Last edited by Mrs. Skeffington; 05-14-2018 at 11:45 AM..
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Old 05-15-2018, 05:29 AM
 
Location: Bloomington IN
5,827 posts, read 7,056,782 times
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What do her parents tell you to feed her and how often? Every two hours seems excessive.

I think my kids ate breakfast at that age, perhaps a mid-morning snack of some fruit or a yogurt drink, lunch and dinner. If lunch was early they might eat an afternoon snack--maybe some dry cereal or crackers.
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Old 05-15-2018, 10:16 AM
 
309 posts, read 136,262 times
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I'm surprised that the kid's parents didn't plan the meals. Make sure you asked if the kid is allergic to anything. When my kid was 3, the menu would be:


Breakfast: scramble eggs with spinach, mixed berries


AM snack: cheerios plain with vanilla yogurt, sliced apple


Lunch: steamed rice, grilled chicken or sautéed ground beef (grass-fed), steamed broccoli


PM snack: string cheese, fruits (berries, orange, plums, pears, tangerine, whatever in season)


Dinner: chicken noodle soups, or steamed rice with poached or grilled salmon, steamed veggies (green beans or broccoli)


I also have Gold Fish crackers for additional snacks if she needs extra snacks, but stop the snack at least 1 hour before meals.


Water only.
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Old 05-15-2018, 09:10 PM
 
126 posts, read 63,514 times
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I was reading someone's FB post the other day and they were saying how they had a really busy day and were embarressed to admit they gave their kids pizza for lunch. Her kids are about 6 and 8 i'd say. My kids are 2 and almost 4 and if they eat pizza I am happy. What is wrong with pizza for lunch? the interesting thing is this woman is overweight but her kids are not. She certainly doesn't seem like she has the authority to be the food police over something like pizza. If it was cheetos and oreos I might say, well yeah that's bad...but pizza?? come on.

This below sounds great:No way would my 3 year old eat all those fruits and veggies.

Here's my 3 year old's sample daily menu (from yesterday):

Breakfast: cheese omelet, apple, chicken sausage

Morning snack: peanut butter on 9 grain bread

Lunch: chicken breast, carrots, steamed broccoli

Afternoon snack: cucumber, bell pepper, raisins, string cheese

Dinner: whole grain spaghetti with grass-fed ground beef, yogurt, pomegranate, mixed veggies
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Old 05-16-2018, 03:09 AM
 
6,116 posts, read 5,137,758 times
Reputation: 8339
Quote:
Originally Posted by lologal321 View Post
I was reading someone's FB post the other day and they were saying how they had a really busy day and were embarressed to admit they gave their kids pizza for lunch. Her kids are about 6 and 8 i'd say. My kids are 2 and almost 4 and if they eat pizza I am happy. What is wrong with pizza for lunch? the interesting thing is this woman is overweight but her kids are not. She certainly doesn't seem like she has the authority to be the food police over something like pizza. If it was cheetos and oreos I might say, well yeah that's bad...but pizza?? come on.

This below sounds great:No way would my 3 year old eat all those fruits and veggies.

Here's my 3 year old's sample daily menu (from yesterday):

Breakfast: cheese omelet, apple, chicken sausage

Morning snack: peanut butter on 9 grain bread

Lunch: chicken breast, carrots, steamed broccoli

Afternoon snack: cucumber, bell pepper, raisins, string cheese

Dinner: whole grain spaghetti with grass-fed ground beef, yogurt, pomegranate, mixed veggies
My daughter makes her own pizza with homemade whole wheat crust for grandsons, and puts kale or spinach on it. I've seen oldest (4 1/2) eat FIVE slices at one sitting. He eats like a truck driver, but his mom supervises his diet carefully. No processed foods, no "junk" snack foods (i.e. goldfish crackers), no meat, and very little sugar. Not an ounce of fat on him. He's tall for his age, long legged and slim.
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Old 05-16-2018, 04:42 PM
 
126 posts, read 63,514 times
Reputation: 217
LOL i was like wow lady you are an on overachiever if you are horrified to eat pizza at lunch. I could barely get my son to eat anything besides a popsicle today
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