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Old 05-11-2018, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,927 posts, read 98,695,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ContraPagan View Post
That doesn't stop people. They make copies of the tickets. My HS alma mater had a scuffle break out at last year's graduation, because of the size of some of the entourages caused them to run out of seats in the theater where it was being held. A woman got into an argument about it with the people letting attendees into the venue, and the police had to intervene. Then some other man not related to this woman started squawking over the way the cops had dealt with her, and he got led away in handcuffs.

I think they need to go to a bar code system, so once a ticket is scanned, subsequent copies will be rejected because of the bar code.
Seems a little extreme for a HS graduation. Maybe a little more emphasis on the "honor system" with the families.
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Old 05-11-2018, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
38,877 posts, read 37,555,977 times
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I agree with you, OP. I don't understand it.

My ex always took the kids out if they even acted like they might start getting rowdy. There's really no need to force the issue, and it's not cool to distract everyone from the reason you're all there.
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Old 05-11-2018, 08:04 AM
 
4,047 posts, read 1,697,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dspguy View Post
Yeah, when my kid would do something like that - really in any public place, I'd get uncomfortable immediately. In a pinch, I might stand near the back for a moment. See if I could get the kid to settle down (I'm talking kids less than a year old). If not, I step outside. If they settle down, I step back inside and stay in the back.
Amen. Same.

My kid would have lasted 1.9 milliseconds in there if he was crying.
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Old 05-11-2018, 08:27 AM
 
4,296 posts, read 1,465,260 times
Reputation: 9946
Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
We get pressured quite often to attend our friend's kids graduations - both high school and college. Back when I graduated, it was normally just family who attended these boring things. Now parents will invite everyone they know and expect an entourage of all their friends to show up at their son or daughter's commencement ceremony. If you're one of these parents just know that lots of people hate these things and resent being asked to attend if it's not their own kid, grandkids brother or sister. The ceremonies are of little interest to anyone else (sorry if that hurts anyone's feelings). No wonder the toddler acted up and had a tantrum.

I will NEVER understand why it's so hard for some people to say "No thank you", and why there has to be resentment.


I'm not just picking you out PriscillaVanilla. I see it all over these forums, where something comes up, and people stress over how they're going to respond, and they blame the inviter...when it's just so easy to say a version of "No thanks".


And regarding graduation invites...maybe it's different now, but back in the day, receiving an invitation was not necessarily an RSVP thing. You got an invitation and/or an announcement for the scrapbook. I used to get graduation invitations from cousins and old friends...and they didn't expect me to attend...it was more like an announcement of an achievement.


And yes, I know that announcements and invitations are not technically the same thing. But I also know that for many, Buying the whole shebang of announcements, invitations, envelopes, etc., can get expensive, when a lot of things are getting expensive around graduation time.
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Old 05-11-2018, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
6,925 posts, read 5,159,491 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eliza61nyc View Post
Lol. Back when i graduated you only got 4 tickets, just enough for immediate family. This was for my godson. It was dull as dishwater. I am super proud of the kid but it was 3 hours looong. Lol plus a screaming toddler
Same...It was usually Mom and Dad and if there were multiple grandparents, siblings didn't make the cut.
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Old 05-11-2018, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Texas
6,342 posts, read 2,312,554 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InchingWest View Post
We live in a society where people are afraid to confront rudeness, for fear of "looking like" a jerk or something..
They're also afraid to say "Your kid's graduation ceremony is of no interest to me. I'd rather not go."
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Old 05-11-2018, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Texas
6,342 posts, read 2,312,554 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sassybluesy View Post
I'm not just picking you out PriscillaVanilla. I see it all over these forums, where something comes up, and people stress over how they're going to respond, and they blame the inviter...when it's just so easy to say a version of "No thanks"..
I do say "No thanks" to lots of invites and people who are well adjusted and normal usually don't have a problem with it. But it can be very hard to tell someone you don't want to attend their child's events if they think the world revolves around that child. We sat through a long high school graduation ceremony for someone I know who invited twenty (20) people she knew to attend. (As if graduating from high school is some big accomplishment, personally I don't think it is these days.) This woman believes the world revolves around her son and she's been known to end friendships with people who forgot his birthday. She thinks they hate him and are trying to persecute him in some way. It's not always that simple. We went through a difficult time of unemployment and stressed over not having money to buy her kid a decent graduation present. We wondered if she would go cold shoulder on us. It wasn't easy.
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Old 05-11-2018, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Denver area
21,130 posts, read 22,080,793 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
They're also afraid to say "Your kid's graduation ceremony is of no interest to me. I'd rather not go."
Afraid? Why would anyone even NEED to say that?

As mentioned above, a simple "no thank you" or "I'm unable to attend", followed by a congratulatory card, is perfectly acceptable. Why the need to be rude?

As for HS graduation not being much of an accomplishment......HS graduation is a milestone. It is the traditional marker of transitioning from childhood to young adulthood, so yes, it is significant. Here, in our large suburban school district, graduation tickets are limited which typically results in immediate family + maybe grandparents attending. Family friends are invited to attend the graduation party.
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Old 05-11-2018, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Texas
6,342 posts, read 2,312,554 times
Reputation: 13558
Quote:
Originally Posted by maciesmom View Post
As for HS graduation not being much of an accomplishment......HS graduation is a milestone. It is the traditional marker of transitioning from childhood to young adulthood, so yes, it is significant. Here, in our large suburban school district, graduation tickets are limited which typically results in immediate family + maybe grandparents attending. Family friends are invited to attend the graduation party.
Then have a big graduation party to celebrate. But friends are not going to enjoy seeing an invitation to that ceremony. Sure, they'll be polite and might even act excited about it. But they're not. Graduation ceremonies were traditionally only for parents or immediate family. Our child-worshipping culture that we live in now has changed things.
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Old 05-11-2018, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Denver area
21,130 posts, read 22,080,793 times
Reputation: 35495
Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
Then have a big graduation party to celebrate. But friends are not going to enjoy seeing an invitation to that ceremony. Sure, they'll be polite and might even act excited about it. But they're not. Graduation ceremonies were traditionally only for parents or immediate family. Our child-worshipping culture that we live in now has changed things.
Which is exactly what I just said

Regardless if whether anyone wants to attend (and frankly I think it's unusual for non-family to be invited to the actual ceremony), if you cannot politely express your "regrets", you have as much of a problem as the "child-centric" parent you described.
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