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Old 03-30-2008, 12:18 PM
Status: "60th anniversary of the polio vaccine! Hail to Pitt!" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
70,023 posts, read 60,539,184 times
Reputation: 20180

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I actually agree with the above. I was just commenting, in general, on the policy of holding kids back. I do not think it is any more helpful than starting them early.

But for the OP, yes, I think the child should go to kindy, as I stated previously. It's very true that K and 1st are no test of how "advanced" a child is.

Having raised two through high school and now into college (one a jr, the other grad school), I definitely agree with this:

Quote:
We have five kids and one thing that we learned, all of the ealry pushing and "better" schooling matters not one whit. Save your moeny for something meaningful. The kids all catch up and even out evnetually. More important, stay involved in their schooling and make homework an attention getting device. (i.e. make it pleasant).
I have seen plenty of bright kids burn out, and plenty of "average" kids pick up a spark later. It may not seem right to you when your kids are little, but it really is true.
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Old 03-30-2008, 01:47 PM
 
Location: SD
896 posts, read 3,078,271 times
Reputation: 325
Okay-I've been reading these and now I'm going to put my two cents in. I started my oldest daughter in preschool at 22 mos so she was younger than everyone in class (October birthday). We lived in a state that had a September 1st cut off. She did a pre-kindergarten program twice. We moved across the country and their cut-off for kindergarten is December 1. So technically, my daughter could skip kindergarten and go right to first grade in our new state. We walked a fine line. This was a tough decision but we opted for kindergarten. The OP stated that her daughter was socially and academically ready for kindergarten. I don't think anything prepared my daughter for the social drama in kindergarten. So much is happening at 5 and 6 years old that never happened when I was this age. Academically, my daughter is almost two years ahead of some of the others in her class but socially, she is probably even or a little below. And she'll also spend an additional year at home (she'll graduate high school a little later versus early) and life is 90% social, learning to get along and working in teams. OP: As a former Montessori teacher I can tell you that putting her in that environment when she hasn't been in it before might not be best for her either.
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Old 03-30-2008, 01:59 PM
 
2,910 posts, read 4,230,739 times
Reputation: 3981
Quote:
Originally Posted by orrmobl View Post
If you read the thread, you will see that I have responded to the OP previously and am well aware of the issue at hand, but thanks for the recap in such a condescending tone, it was really not appreciated.

I was responding the the post directly above mine, please read it and then edit your post so you don't look quite so silly.

Thank you.
Well, that was quite nasty!
My post was in no way intended to be condescending. I'm sorry you took it that way. It just seemed as though you lumped that poster's thinking with the same situation the OP had started the thread with.
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Old 03-30-2008, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Chicago
2,481 posts, read 8,811,396 times
Reputation: 787
We are all giving the OP our opinions, but I wanted to actually provide some scientific studies that she can look at

ScienceDirect - Early Childhood Research Quarterly : School entrance age, social acceptance, and self-perceptions in kindergarten and 1st grade*1

To sum this article up: any differences caused by school entrance age seem to diminish after 1st grade (this also looks at the kids perspective)

http://eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/15/9d/fd.pdf (broken link)

This one's a good, full-text article

Chronological Age and Entrance to First Grade: Effects on Elementary School Success.

(this one isn't full text, but you can read the abstract)

http://eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/15/2e/03.pdf (broken link)

Info on CA's entrance age

Birthdate Effects on School Performance and Adjustment: A Longitudinal Study.

This one also says that there aren't age differences that are noticeable after the first year

ScienceDirect - Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology : Academic achievement and social behaviors associated with age of entry into kindergarten

This one says that the differences due to age disappear by 3rd grade


OK, that's enough!
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Old 03-30-2008, 10:05 PM
 
8,241 posts, read 10,555,617 times
Reputation: 3559
Quote:
Originally Posted by orrmobl View Post
Redshirting kids should be an individual decision regardless of what the rest of the school is doing. It should be based upon actual needs and not an attempt to outcompete the other overly competitive parents out there.

Pro redshirting folks speak about the "gift of time." What better gift can you give your child than providing them with an education that is appropriate to their development level and, in the case of younger kids, a whole year post high school or college to explore the world a little or just find themselves?

Personally, I found this gift to be a far greater one.
I agree that every kid should be given an education to their developmental level...and for those younger kids, it's usually best to wait. Waiting until after high school can be an option for both groups of kids- those held back and those not.
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Old 03-31-2008, 10:55 AM
 
1,623 posts, read 4,327,361 times
Reputation: 394
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessiegirl_98 View Post
We are all giving the OP our opinions, but I wanted to actually provide some scientific studies that she can look at

ScienceDirect - Early Childhood Research Quarterly : School entrance age, social acceptance, and self-perceptions in kindergarten and 1st grade*1

To sum this article up: any differences caused by school entrance age seem to diminish after 1st grade (this also looks at the kids perspective)

http://eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/15/9d/fd.pdf (broken link)

This one's a good, full-text article

Chronological Age and Entrance to First Grade: Effects on Elementary School Success.

(this one isn't full text, but you can read the abstract)

http://eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/15/2e/03.pdf (broken link)

Info on CA's entrance age

Birthdate Effects on School Performance and Adjustment: A Longitudinal Study.

This one also says that there aren't age differences that are noticeable after the first year

ScienceDirect - Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology : Academic achievement and social behaviors associated with age of entry into kindergarten

This one says that the differences due to age disappear by 3rd grade


OK, that's enough!
Don't go clouding the issue with facts and book learnin'! Joe and Jane America have already decided redshirting is the way to go and early entrance dooms you to work in a doughnut shop. They don't let facts, studies, and first person accounts get in the way of what they think they know...
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Old 04-01-2008, 05:45 AM
 
1,024 posts, read 2,881,593 times
Reputation: 390
Frankly, I think that most kids nowadays can handle a kindy program - both socially and academically, however, I am looking further down the road when I make the decision to hold my August child back (with a Sept 12 cutoff).

Driving - I want my son behind the wheel, not at the mercy of his older friends driving him where they want to go.

Dating - I want my son to have one more year maturity when it comes to navigating the dating world.

College - I want my kid to have just turned 19 not 18 when he enters college.

What is the rush, really? We are living longer, getting married later, having babies later, then why the big rush to make sure they start real school ASAP?
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Old 04-01-2008, 05:54 AM
 
1,024 posts, read 2,881,593 times
Reputation: 390
Quote:
Originally Posted by orrmobl View Post
Redshirting kids should be an individual decision regardless of what the rest of the school is doing. It should be based upon actual needs and not an attempt to outcompete the other overly competitive parents out there.
I am not holding my son back to outcompete anyone. As you can read in my above post, I am not considering the younger years at all in my decision, and I certainly am not trying to one-up anyone. My decision is based on my wanting to give him a little extra maturity in high school/college since he's so close to the cutoff line.

Again, what's the great rush?
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Old 04-01-2008, 06:00 AM
 
1,024 posts, read 2,881,593 times
Reputation: 390
Quote:
Originally Posted by orrmobl View Post
Why else would some states have a cutoff in early Sept and others in early Jan?
It is more common to see a late cutoff date and full day kindergarten in areas where there is a high cost of living, or many two-income families.

Areas where there are lots of kids in daycare, are usually the ones with the late cutoffs and full day kindy - CT, NY, etc.

My nephew is in CT and their cut off is Dec 1st and they have full day kindy - same with my cousins in NY. If these boys lived here, their parents would have had to pay for one more year of daycare.

Here in PA - where the cost of living is much less and there are lots of parents home, they keep the cutoff earlier and tend to have half day kindy, because there are not so many kids in daycare whose parents really would like to have them in school FT and not have to pay one more year of high daycare costs.
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Old 04-01-2008, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
2,868 posts, read 6,257,331 times
Reputation: 1446
I would personally keep her in kindergarten...Kids do better with kids their own age...If she were to go into 1st grade she would be the youngest...Not saying she would fall behind but I just notice kids do better when they are the same age...I just don't believe in pushing kids to hard...young kids that is.
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