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Old 10-09-2018, 02:09 PM
 
78 posts, read 79,549 times
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Good afternoon,

I am hoping to get a bit of advice. My son will be 8 soon and I just had a PTC today and was so sad by the news. The school diagnosed him with Autism and speech impairment and he has had an IEP since 1st grade. My son is verbal and can communicate but he does not seem to be making progress at all. He is reading on a kindergarted level. I am not sure what to do anymore because I know he is capable of more than what he is actually doing. I am now regretting passing him on to 1st grade. The school did reccomend retention but I went against that. Should I have another Psychological Assesment done? I cannot get him to work independently at all! If I give him homework etc. I literally have to sit right next to him to get him to focus. Can someone please offer me any advise on how to handle this. He is extremely forgetful and does not retain any information unless of course it is something he is interested in. I am worried about him going to the third grade because they actually start recieving letter grades.
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Old 10-09-2018, 02:19 PM
 
1,019 posts, read 545,831 times
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Are there resources in your area to help children on the spectrum learn? I would think checking with his pediatrician would be a great first step.

I can't speak to working with a child with autism, but I have had great success teaching my child to read at home with this book: https://www.amazon.com/Teach-Your-Ch...in+100+lessons

The instructions to the parent are really straightforward and if you are disciplined it really works. Again I don't know if it would help in your specific circumstance but it might be worth looking into!
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Old 10-09-2018, 04:19 PM
 
15,367 posts, read 16,978,396 times
Reputation: 15081
Quote:
Originally Posted by tigergirl87 View Post
Good afternoon,

I am hoping to get a bit of advice. My son will be 8 soon and I just had a PTC today and was so sad by the news. The school diagnosed him with Autism and speech impairment and he has had an IEP since 1st grade. My son is verbal and can communicate but he does not seem to be making progress at all. He is reading on a kindergarten level. I am not sure what to do anymore because I know he is capable of more than what he is actually doing. I am now regretting passing him on to 1st grade. The school did recommend retention but I went against that. Should I have another Psychological Assessment done? I cannot get him to work independently at all! If I give him homework etc. I literally have to sit right next to him to get him to focus. Can someone please offer me any advise on how to handle this. He is extremely forgetful and does not retain any information unless of course it is something he is interested in. I am worried about him going to the third grade because they actually start recieving letter grades.
I have a 14 year old grandson with autism. We did hold him out a year because he was not ready for kindergarten at 5.

Is your son in a special needs classroom or in a general education classroom? Does he have any support? My grandson had pullouts for reading and math in 1st and 2nd grade and then push in 3rd and 4th grade. Note -he can word call in reading, but struggles with comprehension, so we have him in tutoring 2 days a week with the same teacher who taught his special education class in 1st to 4th grade. He is in 8th grade currently.

Here is a website with some tips you may use:

https://blog.allaboutlearningpress.c...utistic-child/

Children with autism need a lot of repetition so this book with lessons may help:

https://www.amazon.com/Autism-Readin...=UTF8&qid=&sr=

It is designed for whole groups in the classroom, but you can print out the worksheets and use them individually with your son. It goes little by little so it can really help.

Here are some digital lessons to use:
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/...SABEgIeYPD_BwE

I often find that older autistic children or autistic adults can give insight as well.

https://play.google.com/store/books/...FRm7Twodp9UO2Q
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Old 10-09-2018, 04:32 PM
 
4,550 posts, read 1,570,559 times
Reputation: 10589
Quote:
Originally Posted by tigergirl87 View Post
Good afternoon,

I am hoping to get a bit of advice. My son will be 8 soon and I just had a PTC today and was so sad by the news. The school diagnosed him with Autism and speech impairment and he has had an IEP since 1st grade. My son is verbal and can communicate but he does not seem to be making progress at all. He is reading on a kindergarted level. I am not sure what to do anymore because I know he is capable of more than what he is actually doing. I am now regretting passing him on to 1st grade. The school did reccomend retention but I went against that. Should I have another Psychological Assesment done? I cannot get him to work independently at all! If I give him homework etc. I literally have to sit right next to him to get him to focus. Can someone please offer me any advise on how to handle this. He is extremely forgetful and does not retain any information unless of course it is something he is interested in. I am worried about him going to the third grade because they actually start recieving letter grades.

has he been tested for ADD/ADHD?


When my son was your son's age, he was much the same way. I had to sit right next to him, and redirect him constantly. We'd get through one homework question, and then we'd have to redirect again. This will probably improve over time, but it might get worse before it gets better.


I know it's controversial whether to take meds or not...but my son did. He took ritalin. It made a giant huge difference for him. He WAS able to concentrate, and his grades improved.


If you haven't gotten him tested for ADD/ADHD...consider doing so.


Oh...my son was diagnosed FIRST as ADHD, and then later, with Asperger's.
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Old 10-10-2018, 09:22 AM
 
2,500 posts, read 1,328,858 times
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While my son isn’t on the spectrum I will say I have to sit with him or homework doesn’t get done. He’s in third grade. I think that part of it is pretty normal and his reading has just started to really take off. For him it was a matter of wanting to do it. I would be concerned but not panicked yet as he may just be slower to get going than others.
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Old 10-10-2018, 12:05 PM
 
12,527 posts, read 14,687,297 times
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At the Waldorf school here, they don't even BEGIN reading and writing until the child is in third grade....some kids just aren't ready for it yet...and it's not because they're autistic, or have any other disability....
The graduates from this school do as well in life and are as intelligent (if not more so) than their peers in the public schools.
I wouldn't be too concerned if your childs having difficulty reading...he'll eventually pick it up..it'll happen all at once...like BINGO!!!
Give your son a chance..give him time...he's not unlike a WHOLE bunch of other children....read to him daily. I used to write the words of common household items onto labels and stick them to the couch...chair....counter....bed...cup...milk...etc
It helped....encourage and reward him when he tries to read to you...every child is different and learns at different rates and in different ways...(there was waaay less problems when children were taught using phonetics instead of whole language which really makes it very difficult for some children)..it's unfortunate that public schools don't acknowledge that....but instead "diagnose" autism or a spectrum disorder.

Not all teachers are good at teaching...some kids will fall through the cracks, unless their parents teach them what they need to know.

I used to resent that my kids went to school, yet I still had to do most of the actual "teaching" at home, or they wouldn't learn.

The teacher who taught my grade 2ers class would teach the lesson once, and if my child couldn't understand or needed help she would say they should ask a friend for help...yes...another grade 2er...as if.
This teacher also refused to give a pencil when needed...just told the kids to borrow from their friends.
Whole language teaching has created a huge amount of children having problems learning.
Imagine going into a grade one class and one of the words written for them that they should know is "exercise"...they're expected to learn the whole word ...memorize it...not learn to sound words out.

It's up to you to help your child learn to sound out the words.

My grandchildren didn't even know about vowels until I taught them...aeiou and sometimes y.
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Old 10-10-2018, 02:29 PM
 
9,827 posts, read 7,760,724 times
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You indicated that your son will focus on topics that interest him - this may be a key to getting him more engaged in learning. Follow up those interests.

Head to the school or public library and ask for books on his interest level (which may slightly exceed his reading level) on his favorite topics. Take him along and let him browse. Ask the librarian for suggestions and booklists and explain his situation so you'll get well-targeted books on his level. Easy to read books on his favorite things would be best to start with but get a few that are a little challenging.

Then work with him at home using the books, but don't make it "work" - use the books for inspiration and make it fun.

Browse through and look at the pictures first - talk with him about them and let him say what he thinks. Ask him which book he wants to read first, then you read some to him, then have him read some to you. Ask him to tell you what he likes best or doesn't like about the books' contents. Have him draw illustrations or write reports or make crafts inspired by his favorite part.

If it's fiction, act it out with him, just for fun but really to help reinforce comprehension, narrative, characterization and story progress. Be as silly as you like while doing this, then later ask him why he thinks various characters behaved as they did.

What are his favorite topics, btw? At this age, dinosaurs, simple crafts, funny ghost stories, cars and trucks and airplanes, wild animals, cats and dogs, and simple jokes are usually popular. Many libraries keep easy to read books separately or mark their spines so you can find them easily among more challenging books on the same topics.

Heading into third grade, ideally he should be moving into easy chapter books, but it sounds like he will need to make considerable progress before he will be able to independently read books on that level, so stick with easier books for now. Look for the "I Can Read" series, which is older but includes both fiction and information books.

Once he discovers how much fun it can be to learn more about his favorite subjects, push back bedtime fifteen minutes - but he must be in bed, reading or looking at books, without any screens or radios, etc. Just reading. You can also give him a little flashlight and let him think he's getting away with reading under the covers. Or get an exciting book on his level and stop reading it aloud at the most suspenseful moment - but let him know he's free to continue reading himself and to check with you if he doesn't understand some of the words.

Good luck catching this now and getting it dealt with. Third grade can be a crucial academic year for young children, so I am glad you are taking this seriously and addressing it.
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Old 10-10-2018, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,531 posts, read 16,117,323 times
Reputation: 39067
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
You indicated that your son will focus on topics that interest him - this may be a key to getting him more engaged in learning. Follow up those interests.

Head to the school or public library and ask for books on his interest level (which may slightly exceed his reading level) on his favorite topics. Take him along and let him browse. Ask the librarian for suggestions and booklists and explain his situation so you'll get well-targeted books on his level. Easy to read books on his favorite things would be best to start with but get a few that are a little challenging.

Then work with him at home using the books, but don't make it "work" - use the books for inspiration and make it fun.

Browse through and look at the pictures first - talk with him about them and let him say what he thinks. Ask him which book he wants to read first, then you read some to him, then have him read some to you. Ask him to tell you what he likes best or doesn't like about the books' contents. Have him draw illustrations or write reports or make crafts inspired by his favorite part.

If it's fiction, act it out with him, just for fun but really to help reinforce comprehension, narrative, characterization and story progress. Be as silly as you like while doing this, then later ask him why he thinks various characters behaved as they did.

What are his favorite topics, btw? At this age, dinosaurs, simple crafts, funny ghost stories, cars and trucks and airplanes, wild animals, cats and dogs, and simple jokes are usually popular. Many libraries keep easy to read books separately or mark their spines so you can find them easily among more challenging books on the same topics.

Heading into third grade, ideally he should be moving into easy chapter books, but it sounds like he will need to make considerable progress before he will be able to independently read books on that level, so stick with easier books for now. Look for the "I Can Read" series, which is older but includes both fiction and information books.

Once he discovers how much fun it can be to learn more about his favorite subjects, push back bedtime fifteen minutes - but he must be in bed, reading or looking at books, without any screens or radios, etc. Just reading. You can also give him a little flashlight and let him think he's getting away with reading under the covers. Or get an exciting book on his level and stop reading it aloud at the most suspenseful moment - but let him know he's free to continue reading himself and to check with you if he doesn't understand some of the words.

Good luck catching this now and getting it dealt with. Third grade can be a crucial academic year for young children, so I am glad you are taking this seriously and addressing it.
Good points.

You stated that you "know" he can do better? How do you "know" that? Are his teachers saying that they "know" he can do better, too? Are they disappointed in his progress, too? Did his teachers tell you that they expected/expect him to be functioning on grade level or does he have deficits that may cause him problems during his entire school career (or life)?

Your son may be having additional problems or he may be functioning exactly where his teachers, the psychologist and others expected him to be functioning. You really need to speak to them again if you have concerns.

Many school districts rarely allow retention once student has been placed in special education. However, in your son's situation they may have recommended retention in kindergarten because of extreme immaturity combined with small stature combined with being very young for his grade. It is possible that some of those same factors still may be relevant at this point. Ask them if this is something that you would consider.

Good luck to you and your son.

Last edited by germaine2626; 10-10-2018 at 03:35 PM..
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Old 10-10-2018, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Florida
4,265 posts, read 3,129,567 times
Reputation: 8822
The school diagnosed him with autism? I do not have a child with autism and I also do not utilize the public schools, but is this the normal way that it's done? I was under the impression that a medical professional needed to diagnose autism spectrum disorders, not a guidance counselor or whoever diagnosed him at the school.

I would take him to the appropriate specialists and see what they say.
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Old 10-10-2018, 05:17 PM
 
15,367 posts, read 16,978,396 times
Reputation: 15081
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnotherTouchOfWhimsy View Post
The school diagnosed him with autism? I do not have a child with autism and I also do not utilize the public schools, but is this the normal way that it's done? I was under the impression that a medical professional needed to diagnose autism spectrum disorders, not a guidance counselor or whoever diagnosed him at the school.

I would take him to the appropriate specialists and see what they say.
Schools diagnose from an educational perspective. Autism is often diagnosed by both the developmental pediatrician or pediatric neurologist and then again for the IEP with an educational autism dx. School psychologists can identify or classify a child with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) within the school context. The identification of autism should be made by a professional team using multiple sources of information, including, but not limited to an interdisciplinary assessment of social behavior, language and communication, adaptive behavior, motor skills, sensory issues, and cognitive functioning to help with intervention planning and determining eligibility for special educational services.
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