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Old 12-27-2018, 01:03 PM
 
845 posts, read 232,451 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jilly9244 View Post
My son is 11 and we recently moved to a new town over the summer. He transitioned well and is in a youth group at church and scouts. I recently signed him up for basketball at church. He agreed to go for evaluations but doesn't really seem all that interested. He has never really been interested in sports. How can I get him more interested?

Let him find a sport that he likes.



I can't stand basketball/football--watching or playing--but like plenty of other things. Biking, running, etc.- all fun!
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Old 12-27-2018, 01:12 PM
 
930 posts, read 225,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
In my own experience, my parents signed me up for little league and soccer when I was 10 or 11 and I had never played any of those sports or had any interest.

Other kids, especially in baseball, had been playing since being able to walk and could already do things like sliding catches in the outfield and spraying singles to opposite fields and what not.

I was the worst player on the team ... of any gender.

Overall, it was a good experience because our coach was really cool. He played everybody and really cared more about playing kids than winning.

Overall, it was a pretty fun experience if I remember even though I had no interest in it. It'd probably be a different experience if the coach wasn't as cool.

Later on, I got into watching and playing sports on my own ... and still sucked.

BTW, I think baseball is the best sport for such kids. Everybody gets an at bat and if you stick a kid in the outfield, he won't hurt you that bad. Basketball and football lean too heavily towards the best players, and soccer is kind of pointless at that age and just kicking a ball around.


Baseball is awful for distracted kids with little in the way of attention span - there is way too much down time, waiting in line.


Football is inappropriate at that age - its way too physical when you are small and as you get older you need a host of equipment.


Soccer is perfect - "kicking a ball" around is just right. Not to mention its a continuous thing so ball skills, dexterity and balance quickly develop with those malleable young nervous systems. Of all the sports you mentioned, its by far the best for young kids.
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Old 12-27-2018, 01:29 PM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
9,685 posts, read 13,580,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buddy5 View Post
All of the above is so true. It is very important for boys and girls to play sports, it helps with their self-esteem and teaches them that failure is only temporary, if you work hard and improve your skills. Boys and girls often have the advantage of experience of competition over those who don't play sports. You don't have time to dwell on failure in a basketball game, if you are dribbling and the ball is stolen and is going the other way. Girls naturally want to please and are way easier to coach (or teach) than boys. Girls who play sports learn to compete and it helps in life as well. You can't really give someone self-esteem, they have to earn it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by RamenAddict View Post
And this has to be accomplished through sports why, exactly? I played instruments from age 4-18 and I learned plenty about failure and self-esteem through doing orchestra, playing in piano assessments, etc. Kids could also be artistically inclined, sing, do drama, dance (yes, even boys), do more academic competitions. The options are endless for activities to try that are not sports.
Exactly, my son focused on more academic challenges of a very competitive nature, going so far as to coach his team at national competitions. Can't get much more in the way of getting positive self esteem than that, lol.
Sports are great if kids enjoy them (and soccer is great IMO) but it doesn't need to be a team sport. Hiking, biking, swimming, bouncing on a trampoline, horseback riding, etc. are all a good way to get outside and get some exercise without the pressure of having to compete. Not to mention most of those don't involve having to be available on somebody else's schedule, you can do them on your own schedule, always a plus.
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Old 12-27-2018, 01:36 PM
 
930 posts, read 225,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buddy5 View Post
All of the above is so true. It is very important for boys and girls to play sports, it helps with their self-esteem and teaches them that failure is only temporary, if you work hard and improve your skills. Boys and girls often have the advantage of experience of competition over those who don't play sports. You don't have time to dwell on failure in a basketball game, if you are dribbling and the ball is stolen and is going the other way. Girls naturally want to please and are way easier to coach (or teach) than boys. Girls who play sports learn to compete and it helps in life as well. You can't really give someone self-esteem, they have to earn it.


Yes, the benefits of sports, and more generally exercise, go way beyond straight physical fitness. Team sports or more solitary pursuits as some have suggested here, either are good.


For the 200,000 years of human existence (i.e. as Homo sapiens at least) we have been physically active for about 199,900 of them. Our bodies reflect that - in the way they work most efficiently (and that incudes all organs.. yes the brain too). The positive benefits of exercise in mental health and other pathologies, as well as quality of life in ageing and a host of other areas have been proven already. Its not actually a surprise. And while exercising as a pursuit at the gym or such, gets you those benefits, those who are lucky enough to do competitive sports - from tennis to soccer to kickball to swimming races - get the same benefits without even having to apply themselves - because sports participation is fun to a whole bunch of people. People think "I have to go to the gym." No adult racquetball player thinks "I have to go play racquetball".


I think the distinction some people make between sports/physical activity, artistic creativity, and academics is largely self-fulfilling. I've got two graduate degrees, including a PhD from what is usually ranked a Top 5 or top 10 University (depending on whether you are using THES or QS ranking - for whatever that is worth) and worked for a portion of my life as a professor. I could not imagine not having my life balanced with physical activities and sports as well as creative pursuits. It all came from each of those things being part of my life as I was raised. A parent who indulged just my academics would not have been doing me any favors, although it would have meant less work or less "confrontation" for them.

Last edited by Chint; 12-27-2018 at 02:33 PM..
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Old Yesterday, 01:47 AM
 
Location: California
29,822 posts, read 32,341,421 times
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Both my kids hated sports and they tried all of them when they were very young and didn't have a choice. I wasn't too surprised since I always hated sports too. No reason they should ever have to deal with sports. My daughter found her place in theater and the arts, my son in debate and various hobbies he shares with friends. Life is way too short to fight with kids about activities things they have no interest in just because someone say's "it's important". It's really not. I feel the same way about playing musical instruments. If you don't have interest or a knack there's not point.
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Old Today, 10:13 AM
 
Location: bold new city of the south
5,284 posts, read 4,173,497 times
Reputation: 6232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ceece View Post
Both my kids hated sports and they tried all of them when they were very young and didn't have a choice. I wasn't too surprised since I always hated sports too. No reason they should ever have to deal with sports. My daughter found her place in theater and the arts, my son in debate and various hobbies he shares with friends. Life is way too short to fight with kids about activities things they have no interest in just because someone say's "it's important". It's really not. I feel the same way about playing musical instruments. If you don't have interest or a knack there's not point.
Yes, you are right, all kids don't 'need' sports. My main point was 'if' you wanted them to play sports, it is best to start young, because it is much more difficult when starting later. You deserve great credit for giving them opportunities for growth. It sounds like you have done very well.

Last edited by buddy5; Today at 10:14 AM.. Reason: lousy speling
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