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Old Yesterday, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,257 posts, read 99,505,650 times
Reputation: 31769

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20+ years in pediatrics and I never heard that from any professional source or even from another parent, and believe me, I heard a lot from parents especially when I worked the phone desk. In fact, a diet for a child with diarrhea is called the "BRAT" diet, meaning bananas, rice, applesauce and toast. We always told parents the "toast" could be any white carbohydrate that the child likes, and to add protein to this diet as well. My experience spans far more than 11 kids.

I never said I didn't like you, did I? What was that all about?
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Old Yesterday, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,257 posts, read 99,505,650 times
Reputation: 31769
Quote:
Originally Posted by ukiyo-e View Post
Adenoviruses have similar symptoms to flu viruses, and whenever someone tells me they got the flu even though they got vaccinated for it, I suspect adenovirus, unless it's a year with a known circulating flu virus that didn't make it into the vaccine due to a mutation or recombination with another flu virus that arose after the vaccine formulation for that year was decided.
Not really. Some of the symptoms overlap.

Here are the symptoms of adeno:
https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/adenovirus.html
It's quite a long list.
Here's flu:
https://kidshealth.org/en/teens/flu.html
This is very important to keep in mind:
"If you have only vomiting and diarrhea without the other flu symptoms, you probably have gastroenteritis . Though some kinds of gastroenteritis are known as "stomach flu," they're not the same as influenza. Some gastrointestinal infections are caused by non-flu viruses or bacteria."

A big difference is that with flu one is usually much sicker.
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Old Yesterday, 01:06 PM
 
Location: here
24,607 posts, read 28,986,432 times
Reputation: 31427
Quote:
Originally Posted by coschristi View Post
OMG. I didn't say potatoes cause Norovirus.

What I said was: I have observed that children recovering from Norovirus seemed to experience recurrent vomiting after ingesting potatoes.

Potatoes don't "infect" them with norovirus & Potatoes don't "re-infect" them with it either. Potatoes DO seem to be inducing "post-Noro" vomiting.

A child recovering from Norovirus is a dehydrated child. The main objective in hospitalizing children with Norovirus; is IV hydration. Vomiting, even just one time, while recovering from Norovirus; can cause a child to become dehydrated enough to require IV hydration.

While swiping a handful of potato chips will not cause Norovirus; I have observed that post-Noro children who swipe a handful of potato chips; will vomit.

I have not observed with any consistency; post-Noro children vomiting after eating a handful of saltine crackers.

I have not observed with any consistency; post-Noro children vomiting after sipping a cup of chicken noodle soup broth.

I have not observed with any consistency; post-Noro children vomiting after eating popsicles, dry toast, jello, or plain rice cakes.

But with an astounding consistency; I have noticed post-Noro children vomiting after eating french-fries, potato chips, mashed potatoes & plain boiled potatoes.

And vomiting, even just one time, while recovering from Norovirus; can cause a child to become dehydrated enough to require IV re-hydration.

As an RN (as you are also), I advocate for well-hydrated children. I'm not anti-potato ... I'm anti-vomiting.

As I've stated before on other threads here on Parenting; being a mom of 11 kids does not mean I know everything. Being a mom to three dozen kids wouldn't mean I knew everything either.

What it does mean; is that I've had a lot of experience in learning how not to do things & one of those things that I've learned; is not to give potatoes to a kid recovering from Norovirus. Because if I do?

I'm the one who has to clean it up. It's the quick-study program of What Not To Do With Norovirus.

You don't have to like me, or like what I say & you certainly don't have to listen to what I say either. Nobody does. I'm okay with that; I don't have to clean up your kid.
I've been in public health, for 20 years and have never heard any such thing about potatoes.
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Old Yesterday, 05:13 PM
 
9,864 posts, read 7,791,937 times
Reputation: 17749
Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
I found out that libraries really aren't the right place for toddlers, in spite of whatever activities they might host. A lot of the librarians shouldn't be expected to clean up so much after kids and besides, a lot of them don't seem to have much tolerance for young children.
Public libraries certainly ARE the right places for toddlers and those activities you mention are expressly designed for this age and are usually offered at least once a week. In addition, where else can you borrow books and other materials designed for little children and selected by professional librarians who specialize in children's services absolutely free?? Where can you and your child attend a story time which includes not just stories but interactive activities designed to increase your child's attention span, social skills, and receptive and expressive language abilities?

I agree that librarians shouldn't be expected to have to clean up messes - that's why toddlers should be accompanied by a parent or another familiar adult to help direct them and to put puzzles and other toys back where they belong.

As for books pulled off shelves, just put them on a library table and don't try to re-shelve them - a library page (NOT a librarian with a master's degree in library science) will re-shelve them correctly later. There's a difference between encouraging a toddler's natural interest in books and their contents, and ignoring a toddler who is enjoying pulling one book after another off the shelves and tossing them on the floor just for the heck of it.

If a child has released their biological functions onto a library chair or the floor, they should be in diapers or at home recuperating, and no, the librarians should not have to clean up the resulting mess.

As for intolerant librarians, are you referring to children's librarians, or to adult services librarians? And were said young children left alone in the children's room while parents browsed elsewhere? That's what bugs librarians - being mistaken for unpaid babysitters. Children's librarians certainly don't dislike toddlers, or they wouldn't have entered this profession. They understand child development, and are experts at matching children with age- and developmental level appropriate materials - just ask.

Don't deny toddlers the great joy accessible through the public library.

p.s. Didn't you recently write in another thread that at least one of your children refused to read and instead would tear up books if you offered them to him or her?? I have to wonder if there is a connection with that behavior and your evident antipathy to taking small children to the public library...
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Old Yesterday, 08:28 PM
 
41 posts, read 8,587 times
Reputation: 70
I guess I don't really see the point of a daycare sanitizing toys when the kids are playing with them together and breathing the same air. Nothing wrong with cleaning but I'm guessing it doesn't do much good especially since kids are notoriously getting sick at daycare anyways. Seems like a wash, hah!
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Old Yesterday, 08:30 PM
 
41 posts, read 8,587 times
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Default re

Quote:
Originally Posted by AnotherTouchOfWhimsy View Post
Our pediatrician office had a sick room and a well room. The sick room just had a television, and the well room had toys. I don't know if that stopped the transmission of illnesses. I imagine it probably reduced them as long as sick children really didn't go into the well room. It seemed like the kids would generally get sick within a few days of going for their well visits. I'm glad we are out of that phase, LOL.
Our pedi has one room for everyone and then a room for well newborns (3 months and under)

It bothers me that there isn't just a sick room and well room. I dont know how much good it would do since everyone is seen in the same dr's offices...but it would probably make parents feel more at ease
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Old Yesterday, 08:34 PM
 
41 posts, read 8,587 times
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Default re

Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
Ummm... we (the librarians) don't actually clean up after them, aside from maybe picking up the toys after a storytime. That's what custodians and pages/shelvers are for, lol. Unless we're talking about a one-person operation in a small town, of course.

And any CHILDREN'S librarian should obviously have tolerance for children, or they would have gone into adult services instead. Occasionally you'll get one who just took the first job available, but it's rare to be hired for children's services without the experience and/or passion for that work. I'm actually in adult services myself, and never do storytimes or children's programming. I do reference for kids at another branch sometimes, but only because it's a single-service desk with ONE librarian on duty at a time. I'm fairly tolerant, though, as long as they aren't behaving like wild animals.
At our library the librarian cleans up the toys if they kids or parents don't do it. Someone has to do it and janitors don't pick up toys, they clean floors, bathrooms, vaccuum rugs. I dont see why picking up a few toys should be beneath a librarian. Teachers pick up after kids and it's a similar role.
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Old Yesterday, 09:43 PM
 
Location: here
24,607 posts, read 28,986,432 times
Reputation: 31427
Quote:
Originally Posted by McBridge781 View Post
I guess I don't really see the point of a daycare sanitizing toys when the kids are playing with them together and breathing the same air. Nothing wrong with cleaning but I'm guessing it doesn't do much good especially since kids are notoriously getting sick at daycare anyways. Seems like a wash, hah!
A lot of illnesses aren't airborne, but are spread through bodily fluids like saliva, vomit and feces. There are a lot of rules day care centers have to follow to help prevent the spread of illness. If they see a kid put a toy int heir mouth, they have to set it aside so no one else plays with it. They have to sanitize toys once/week, but many do it every day. Kid still get sick, but it would be worse if they didn't sanitize. Gross.
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Old Yesterday, 10:27 PM
 
Location: colorado springs, CO
4,149 posts, read 1,859,431 times
Reputation: 14332
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
20+ years in pediatrics and I never heard that from any professional source or even from another parent, and believe me I heard a lot from parents especially when I worked the phone desk.
Me either, although I only floated to Peds & cross-trained into PICU.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
I heard a lot from parents especially when I worked the phone desk. In fact, a diet for a child with diarrhea is called the "BRAT" diet, meaning bananas, rice, applesauce and toast. We always told parents the "toast" could be any white carbohydrate that the child likes, and to add protein to this diet as well.
I'm a believer in the BRAT diet as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
My experience spans far more than 11 kids.
So does mine; professionally speaking. And professionally speaking; we see these kids in a controlled environment. Well; I did at least, because I worked in acute care for the most part, while you worked in ambulatory care.

My ambulatory care experience is minimal, compared to acute care. But either way, while I don't get sick from either Roto nor Noro anymore (maybe indigestion); having to go 48 hours straight with no sleep, washing 16 loads of laundry, running the carpet shampooer, bleaching, spraying air freshener, emptying buckets, wiping butts & timing ice chips/sips of water (one of mine is so susceptible I had to use a 10cc syringe to "dose" her fluids) ... can make one get a bit militant regarding "who puts what in their mouth & when".

At home, once someone vomited & if I smelled that Noro smell; I made them NPO for 4 hours & would start with sips of clears, wait an hour, try more clears, repeat x 3, then BRAT, etc ... & everyone would get mad at me & try to sneak something & I think the potato chips were how I first started noticing it. Kids probably were craving something salty due to dehydration but whenever one of them would sneak a few; it was inevitable; they would vomit & have to repeat the whole process.

I noticed that most of the time, it would take about 4-5 days before they could tolerate potatoes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
I never said I didn't like you, did I? What was that all about?
That "you" was to readers in general. Like a "don't throw the baby out with the bathwater" statement. This is the first time I've mentioned it in a public venue because I have no supporting evidence. Maybe it will help someone, who knows. I was kind of hoping somebody else would validate me by saying they had noticed the same (probably not going to happen).
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Old Today, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
28,339 posts, read 43,767,972 times
Reputation: 18942
Quote:
Originally Posted by McBridge781 View Post
At our library the librarian cleans up the toys if they kids or parents don't do it. Someone has to do it and janitors don't pick up toys, they clean floors, bathrooms, vaccuum rugs. I dont see why picking up a few toys should be beneath a librarian. Teachers pick up after kids and it's a similar role.
Try reading my post again, with emphasis on the bolded...

Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
Ummm... we (the librarians) don't actually clean up after them, aside from maybe picking up the toys after a storytime. That's what custodians and pages/shelvers are for, lol. Unless we're talking about a one-person operation in a small town, of course.
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