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Old 12-17-2018, 04:40 PM
 
9,913 posts, read 7,875,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
I completely agree. Children need to be read stories that have a plot.

I never liked the Dr. Seuss books because there isn't a story there.

Children who are read to at a young age have better skills with forming stories, also, and can recount an event in a story format, rather than just a randomly put together grouping of observations.

One of our favorite books was a collection, with the classics like Goldilocks, Little Red Riding Hood, etc., with really beautiful illustrations.
Dr. Seuss's earlier picture books, as opposed to his later somewhat bland easy readers, are packed with wildly imaginative plots! They're still around, so look for picture book classics like "The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins", "If I ran the Circus", "To Think that I Saw it on Mulberry Street", and more. Actually, especially for Seuss picture books, the illustrations are half the narrative.

Caldecott Medal books and Caldecott Honor books are also solid choices. Ask your local public children's librarian for additional suggestions for this age range - there's a huge leap in comprehension and ability between ages four and eight. "Easy chapter books" are intended for around third grade, as children transition from picture books and easy readers to longer fare.

If you're considering giving classics like "Charlotte's Web", and the four to eight year olds are siblings, check with the parents to make sure the books you're considering are not already in the family library.
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Old 12-21-2018, 09:05 PM
 
642 posts, read 405,914 times
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I have a four year old and I prefer hardcover books but it doesn't really matter. I buy most of mine at Ross for around $4 and they are good quality books.

Maybe I'm in the minority but I can't stand Dr. Seuss books. We have a few that were given to us and I'll read one if she picks it out but I'd rather read just about anything else.

I bought a big box of the Little Miss books for Christmas and I'm hoping they'll be a hit.
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Old 12-26-2018, 07:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
This isn't about hard or soft cover, but please consider giving children in that age range the Pigeon Books by Mo Willems.

Oh my gosh. Kids LOVE these books, and are inspired to read.

Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus.

The Pigeon Wants a Puppy.

The Duckling Gets a Cookie.

The Pigeon Needs a Bath.

Just sayin'.
And Nanette's Baguette!
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Old 12-26-2018, 08:04 PM
 
227 posts, read 95,977 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
I looking at giving some gifts. I wanted to get the opinions of actual parents. For young children (age 4-8), do you prefer children's picture books in hardback or softback cover?

I know hardbacks are more durable. However, in this age group, reading ability changes so fast, that I would think the child would go through books really fast. Softcover tends to be a bit cheaper and this would allow one to buy more books overall.


As parents, which do you prefer?
We have a fantastic library system and can get just about any book there, so I have no need to buy books for that age. But if I did, I would go with softback. If a particular book becomes treasured, then as it wears down you know it will be worth it to buy the replacement in hardback.

There is a huge difference in reading level between ages 4 and 8. Four year olds are being read to mostly - so pictures are super important - while eight year olds can (or should) be able to read stories, with or without illustrations. I first read my favorite book of all time around age eight. It was a children's novel, not picture book.
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Old 12-30-2018, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Central, NJ
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I wanted to come back and add that my son received several softcover Captain Underpants books for Christmas and couldn't be happier!
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Old 12-30-2018, 06:36 PM
 
8,334 posts, read 8,672,914 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
I looking at giving some gifts. I wanted to get the opinions of actual parents. For young children (age 4-8), do you prefer children's picture books in hardback or softback cover?

I know hardbacks are more durable. However, in this age group, reading ability changes so fast, that I would think the child would go through books really fast. Softcover tends to be a bit cheaper and this would allow one to buy more books overall. As parents, which do you prefer?
I don't prefer picture books at all.

By the time a child is 4, I think the time for picture books is past.

That said, I prefer hardcover. Keep in mind that it doesn't have to be the latest bestseller for a child. You could look in the discount section of a chain like Barnes and Noble, or buy like-new used books, too.
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Old Today, 08:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cida View Post
I don't prefer picture books at all.

By the time a child is 4, I think the time for picture books is past.

That said, I prefer hardcover. Keep in mind that it doesn't have to be the latest bestseller for a child. You could look in the discount section of a chain like Barnes and Noble, or buy like-new used books, too.
Picture books are generally written with children up to six or seven years old in mind. Some are clearly for younger children, but there are also plenty of wonderful picture books for primary grade kids.

Not to mention the "graphic novels" that many teenagers devour!

(I agree with the rest of your post).
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Old Today, 08:31 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
10,963 posts, read 19,315,463 times
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I usually bought hardcover books, but we bought them at the library used book store where kids' books were a quarter each or 50 cents for hardcover books. Now all my kids want are ebooks so they can read on their tablets when they should be asleep.
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