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Old 12-15-2018, 09:25 PM
 
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I looking at giving some gifts. I wanted to get the opinions of actual parents. For young children (age 4-8), do you prefer children's picture books in hardback or softback cover?

I know hardbacks are more durable. However, in this age group, reading ability changes so fast, that I would think the child would go through books really fast. Softcover tends to be a bit cheaper and this would allow one to buy more books overall.


As parents, which do you prefer?
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Old 12-15-2018, 09:35 PM
 
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This isn't about hard or soft cover, but please consider giving children in that age range the Pigeon Books by Mo Willems.

Oh my gosh. Kids LOVE these books, and are inspired to read.

Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus.

The Pigeon Wants a Puppy.

The Duckling Gets a Cookie.

The Pigeon Needs a Bath.

Just sayin'.
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Old 12-15-2018, 09:40 PM
 
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The soft covers are fine and take up less space too.
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Old 12-15-2018, 09:42 PM
 
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Ages 4-8? Paperbacks. Why spend more for books that they will shortly outgrow. And I agree, a pile of paperbacks is preferable to just one or two hardbacks.

When my kids were that age, I got most of their books from the library used book room. Maybe that's not ideal for gifts, but many of the books appeared brand new, and even the hardbacks were never more than $1.
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Old 12-15-2018, 11:41 PM
 
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Paperback books are fine...like what was said before, they don't take too much space. I always think the kids will throw the hardback books at each other and it will hurt someone.(Maybe that was just me and my brother...lol)
You didn't ask for advice on what to buy, but those "Little Miss" books were always popular with my kids and they are small and easy to store. Just the other day, my daughter thought about those because she saw them at a book store and she told me loved those stories.
Here is what I'm talking about...

https://www.thriftbooks.com/series/l...s-books/59877/
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Old 12-17-2018, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Central, NJ
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Unless it's a very special, particular book I would go with softcover. We've been getting the Harry Potter illustrated hardcovers, so I wouldn't want the softcover of one. My son would not mind having two copies though! Sometimes the hardcover can be different too - Captain Underpants softcovers sometimes don't have color illustrations.

We go to the library at least once a week, my son goes to the library at school once a week and has access to a reading app through school that has e and audio books and there are still books he wants to buy, so you really can't go wrong with giving a book as a present!
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Old 12-17-2018, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Bloomington IN
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It really depended on the book. Like the examples mentioned above--Harry Potter was hardcover because it is, or will be, a classic series. Captain Underpants--paperback.

Books which have, or probably will, stand the test of time were purchased as hardbacks. I've kept those types of books to read to any grandchildren I might have some day. Series type books like The Babysitter's Club or whatever, were paperbacks.

BTW--You don't need to only purchase picture books for that age group. One of the things that helps children learn to read is being read to, and it doesn't have to be picture books. A good story is all that matters. Chapter type books like "Charlotte's Web" or a "Wrinkle in Time" and other classics appeal to young children. Later they can read it on their own.

I'd do a classic in hardcover for the family to read together and then a few paperbacks.
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Old 12-17-2018, 10:37 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rrah View Post
It really depended on the book. Like the examples mentioned above--Harry Potter was hardcover because it is, or will be, a classic series. Captain Underpants--paperback.

Books which have, or probably will, stand the test of time were purchased as hardbacks. I've kept those types of books to read to any grandchildren I might have some day. Series type books like The Babysitter's Club or whatever, were paperbacks.

BTW--You don't need to only purchase picture books for that age group. One of the things that helps children learn to read is being read to, and it doesn't have to be picture books. A good story is all that matters. Chapter type books like "Charlotte's Web" or a "Wrinkle in Time" and other classics appeal to young children. Later they can read it on their own.

I'd do a classic in hardcover for the family to read together and then a few paperbacks.
I completely agree. Children need to be read stories that have a plot.

I never liked the Dr. Seuss books because there isn't a story there.

Children who are read to at a young age have better skills with forming stories, also, and can recount an event in a story format, rather than just a randomly put together grouping of observations.

One of our favorite books was a collection, with the classics like Goldilocks, Little Red Riding Hood, etc., with really beautiful illustrations.
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Old 12-17-2018, 01:33 PM
 
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I went with mainly hardback books for my kids. My opinion was that the books with more substance had hardbacks. My kids tended to like the books that told some sort of story and were funny.

I think we often like Dr. Suess books because we are led to believe they are great. A few of his books can be fun, but many are not.
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Old 12-17-2018, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
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Soft cover is fine but there is often less of a price difference than you might expect between hard and soft cover books

For example, Kohls has a rotating selection of hard cover kids books for $5 each, along with plush toys that go with the books that are also $5. And the proceeds support charity

https://www.kohls.com/catalog/kohls-...B&gclsrc=aw.ds

And my son has books that I am saving for his (someday) kids because they are so beautiful. I'm glad we have those in hard cover. Jan Brett's books are a good example of those.

Once he was a little older (8 and older) and reading on his own and went through a lot of different book series, that's when we switched more to primarily paperbacks.
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