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Old Yesterday, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
52,483 posts, read 51,615,176 times
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I used to have my daughter and two of my nieces on New Year's Eve. I bought them special snacks and they played games or watched movies, and at midnight I let them go outside and bang pots and pans and yell "Happy New Year!"

Now they're all grown, but I get to keep the memories.

One year I remember while they were hanging out, I spent the evening writing a short horror story for a contest that had a deadline of January 1. I didn't win, but I had so much fun writing that story.
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Old Yesterday, 11:09 PM
 
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When I was a kid, we were allowed to stay awake as late as we wanted on Friday and Saturday nights. Holidays were basically free for alls, too. So, NYE in my family meant you got to stay up as late as the adults did, pop fireworks, have a shot of champagne at midnight and usually end up in bed by 1:00 a.m. I'm a grandma now and that tradition still holds. I have grandchildren ranging from 14 months to 13 years. We'll be doing it up tomorrow night as we have for years! Happy New Year, everyone!
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Old Yesterday, 11:29 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,143 posts, read 1,339,358 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandmax4 View Post
When I was a kid, we were allowed to stay awake as late as we wanted on Friday and Saturday nights. Holidays were basically free for alls, too. So, NYE in my family meant you got to stay up as late as the adults did, pop fireworks, have a shot of champagne at midnight and usually end up in bed by 1:00 a.m. I'm a grandma now and that tradition still holds. I have grandchildren ranging from 14 months to 13 years. We'll be doing it up tomorrow night as we have for years! Happy New Year, everyone!
Your parents were more generous than mine. I had strict bedtimes at all times, even on weekends; summers got a bit more leeway. Although by high school, my parents pretty much gave up on bedtimes. Plus, unless it was a Friday or a Saturday, I lied and said I was studying, when chatting with friends or new strangers on AOL; I kept an open Netscape Navigator window with my school's website or a news article. (Man, I feel old typing this. )

New Year's Eve is tomorrow. Happy 2019, everyone!
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Old Today, 07:01 AM
 
3,135 posts, read 1,686,240 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
I first stayed up when I started kindergarten. My parents framed it as: "if you're old enough to go to school, you're old enough to stay up". First time, I went to bed around 12:30. Later on, I stayed up with everyone else until the end, be it at home or at relatives' place. They occupied me by having decorate cookies for midnight dessert (a New Year thing in my family) and putting on cartoons on VHS.

Senior year of high school was my first New Year's Eve celebrated neither at home nor with relatives. It was with friends in someone's basement. For about a week beforehand, we fanned out, hit up local grocery stores, and bought lots of bottles of vanilla extract. Which contains alcohol . Then we mixed it with sparkling grape juice, to make what I call "high school champagne". Good times!
Lol, great story about the vanilla extract, but your mom isnít reading this so can you tell us the truth? It is literally impossible for anyone but a hard core skid row alcoholic to drink enough vanilla extract, even mixed with sparkling grape juice, to become any type of happy, plus the $ per ounce of alcohol in vanilla extract is off the charts. It would be much cheaper and far more enjoyable to get someoneís older brother to buy a bottle of vodka.
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Old Today, 12:44 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
17,852 posts, read 22,159,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
I'm wondering: What's the general consensus for letting your kid(s) stay up on New Year's Eve nowadays? For the purpose of this discussion, assume we're talking about appropriate venues for staying up, like at home, at a family member's party, in a child-friendly restaurant, etc.
* From what age is it acceptable to let your kid stay up?
* Do you put them to bed at the stroke of midnight, or do you let them enjoy the actual *new* year?
* How do you occupy them?
* Does it make a difference if you have one child or multiple?
* If no, do you attend community events like New Year's Noon? (with simulated NYE activities held at noon)

Discuss!
Well, when I was a kid, my parents went out for some rather festive, 1960s New Years Eve parties, usually at a club in NYC - I remember The Peppermint Lounge and the Copa. They always bought us, and our cousins, party hats and noise makers. They generally went out with an couple of business associates and my maternal aunts and uncles. They bought us Jiffy Pop, Wise Potato chips and we made onion dip. Sometimes we also made Chex Mix.. It was fun with my four cousins. Even my sisters were fun.

Our baby sitters were my maternal grandmother and sometimes my Oma, my paternal grandmother. Occasionally we were joined by my cousin's Morfar - all three were widowed, and they enjoyed being with us and "socializing". Dinner was comprised of snacks, cold cuts, and celery sticks stuffed with jarred pimiento cheese spread, a lime jello "salad" and pineapple upside down cup cakes. My cousin's grandfather took Polaroids and we stayed up to watch "The Ball Drop" and toasted with Hoffman's soda pop. My grandmother had Dubonet with a twist, the other a cup of Harvey's Bristol Creme and my 'adopted" mor far had some akavit. The adults all ate sardine and onion sandwiches -which we all thought was stinky.

We usually played cards - games like Old Maid and Go Fish.

When I had younger kids, we never went far from home at night. We don't like driving on NYE. The designated babysitter was my wonderful late mother-in-law. She wasn't much of a cook, so we'd order Chinese food, and I taught my MIL how to make Chex Mix. I'd leave them with fruit kabobs, and I carried on the tradition of party hats, and noise makers, adding New Years balloons and decorations and confetti from party city. Instead of cousins, they were each allowed to have a friend sleep over. Instead of a Poloroid, the kids snapped pictures with their phones. Their Gradma used her trusty Minolta.

We always came home around ten and watched the ball drop with my kids. Instead of Hoffman's black cherry, my kiddos and their friends enjoyed Solo cups of Welches carbonated grape juice.

About a half hour after midnight, I sent them all to bed, and they fell asleep soon after.

I miss those days. Having a house full of kids and my mother in law.

Anyway, I am a big believer in regular bedtimes, but celebrations were a happy part of growing up.

Last edited by sheena12; Today at 01:01 PM..
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Old Today, 01:43 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
17,852 posts, read 22,159,590 times
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Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
I disagree about your attitude towards drinking. The research backs me up. Kids whose parents disapprove of drinking are less likely to drink.
https://www.npr.org/sections/health-...-teen-drinking
A newer article: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...le/1067481001/

My kids are in their 30s, and I can't even remember any more when we allowed them to stay up until midnight. My wild guess would be at around 10 or so. No alcohol until they were about 18.
I never encouraged drinking, but regardless of the state laws, I happen to think 21 is a ridiculous age to be able to drink. One can marry, serve their country, sign a contract, buy a house - or strangely, cigarettes, but they can't have a glass of champagne at there own wedding - or on New Years Eve? Or HS, and sometimes college graduation. It strikes me as absurd.

I was not raised in a religious tradition that frowned upon drinking. Growing up, we had Octoberfest at church - and wine and beer tasting in the Narthex and in the Fellowship hall.

It's probably true that parents who disapprove of drinking have children who are less likely to drink socially. They are also more likely to be able to deal with moderation and social drinking, shifting quickly from one extreme to the other. I've noticed that former Fundamentalist Christians are quite likely to over indulge in alcohol once they leave their strict sect, and figure out that Jesus never said a word about avoiding alcohol, and drinking is not sin. In fact, certain religious reformers were fans social drinking and drinking with meals.

There has also been an uptick in binge drinking at colleges and universities since on campus "Rathskellers" were shut down in the mid 1980s and tragically an increase in alcohol poisoning, and alcohol related car accidents, since booze was banned from college campuses.

Our goal was never to raise teetotalers or young adults who disaprove of drinking or who do not enjoy a drink on New Years or a cold beer or two of July 4th.

What we are dead set against is the deadly practice of drinking and driving. We've always had zero tolerance for that and behavior with good results.
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Old Today, 05:22 PM
 
4,263 posts, read 3,595,955 times
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If they wanted to stay up they could in sleeping bags in livingroom and watch a countdown. We always save back some 4th of July overhead fireworks & when the kids were young they had great fun with sparklers. Fireworks & snow make a great combination in Montana where sometimes dry summers make them a bad idea.
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Old Today, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,143 posts, read 1,339,358 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rugrats2001 View Post
Lol, great story about the vanilla extract, but your mom isn’t reading this so can you tell us the truth? It is literally impossible for anyone but a hard core skid row alcoholic to drink enough vanilla extract, even mixed with sparkling grape juice, to become any type of happy, plus the $ per ounce of alcohol in vanilla extract is off the charts. It would be much cheaper and far more enjoyable to get someone’s older brother to buy a bottle of vodka.
We were all 16 or 17, and none of us had older siblings. Most "skid row alcoholics" are in their 30's thru 50's; we were teens, so our tolerance was much lower. Also don't forget: some brands of vanilla extract contain a lot of alcohol, and the bottle was about 2 oz, costing $4 apiece. Buy 10 bottles altogether, mix it into sparking grape juice, and you got a recipe for a fun New Year's Eve; well, fun for a bunch of high school seniors. Not to mention, when you're 17, you don't really need fancy entertainment while drunk. Wandering around the streets at night (about 10:00 PM), watching the streetlights sparkle, was just as fun. We just avoided city parks like the plague; there were always cops hovering around.

Looking back, I can't help but wonder what was more exciting: actually consuming alcohol, the secretive convoluted pre-work to make the consumption happen, or walking off the buzz in the streets.

Last edited by MillennialUrbanist; Today at 06:58 PM..
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Old Today, 06:52 PM
Status: "Epiphany Season" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,574 posts, read 99,910,588 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
I never encouraged drinking, but regardless of the state laws, I happen to think 21 is a ridiculous age to be able to drink. One can marry, serve their country, sign a contract, buy a house - or strangely, cigarettes, but they can't have a glass of champagne at there own wedding - or on New Years Eve? Or HS, and sometimes college graduation. It strikes me as absurd.

I was not raised in a religious tradition that frowned upon drinking. Growing up, we had Octoberfest at church - and wine and beer tasting in the Narthex and in the Fellowship hall.

It's probably true that parents who disapprove of drinking have children who are less likely to drink socially. They are also more likely to be able to deal with moderation and social drinking, shifting quickly from one extreme to the other. I've noticed that former Fundamentalist Christians are quite likely to over indulge in alcohol once they leave their strict sect, and figure out that Jesus never said a word about avoiding alcohol, and drinking is not sin. In fact, certain religious reformers were fans social drinking and drinking with meals.

There has also been an uptick in binge drinking at colleges and universities since on campus "Rathskellers" were shut down in the mid 1980s and tragically an increase in alcohol poisoning, and alcohol related car accidents, since booze was banned from college campuses.

Our goal was never to raise teetotalers or young adults who disaprove of drinking or who do not enjoy a drink on New Years or a cold beer or two of July 4th.

What we are dead set against is the deadly practice of drinking and driving. We've always had zero tolerance for that and behavior with good results.
I never said anything about drinking age, but we will have to agree to disagree. I am very much opposed to a drinking age of 18 because that puts legal drinking in the high schools. Kids start to turn 18 their senior year, and those who were "red-shirted" start turning 18 before that. 18 year olds can also legally buy alcohol for younger kids with a drinking age of 18. Even 19 gets it into the HS through friends, and because the actual drinking age is usually about 2 years younger than the legal age, e.g. kids get fake ID cards to drink in bars and purchase alcohol, etc. Since most states allow kids to drink if parents are present, it seems a young bride or groom could drink if her/his parents were around, ditto on NYE or the 4th of July.

The age to marry, sign a contract, buy a house or cigarettes varies by state with some states at least talking about raising the age of cigarette buying to 21. That's quite a change from when I was a kid and there seemed to be no lower age limit in Pennsylvania; I was sent to the store to buy cigarettes for my dad as a kid, and even when I was old enough to be plausibly buying them for myself, I was never carded or turned down. Kids can serve in the military at age 17 with parents' permission.
Legal Ages laws - Information on the law about Legal Ages - Guardian, Consent, Minor, and Treatment - JRank Articles
https://www.iihs.org/iihs/topics/law...edlicenseintro
Tobacco 21 | Tobacco Prevention and Control

There is more drinking on "wet" college campuses than on dry campuses. College binge drinking hasn't change substantially in years.
https://www.projectknow.com/discover...ime-on-campus/
https://www.chronicle.com/interactives/alcohol_binge

My husband and I are not teetotalers, nor are our grown offspring.
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Old Today, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Florida
4,523 posts, read 3,223,697 times
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Yes, of course they can stay up on New Year's Eve! I'm talking about 7/8... before that, you're likely just inviting crying and whining. I think around the age of 7/8/9 we would let them try to stay up and they probably were able to do it by the time they were 10 or 11. Now they're teens and they're always up until midnight. The problem is that I'm not able to stay up! *yawn*
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