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Old Yesterday, 08:39 AM
 
Location: NY>FL>VA>NC>IN
2,255 posts, read 846,707 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gus2 View Post
Not sick. Extended nursing and cosleeping are actually very common and healthy around the world.

Worldwide Average Age Of Human Weaning -
Yes one of my undergrad degrees is in cultural anthro. I am well aware of this.

There are reasons this is so in other cultures that do not apply to Western middle class societies.

Moderator cut: delete

Last edited by Miss Blue; Today at 07:09 PM.. Reason: off topic and will likely cause a hijack
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Old Yesterday, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
7,518 posts, read 5,551,257 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
My sister co-sleeps because her son (3.5 years) is still breastfeeding and she likes the convenience of being able to feed him without getting up. They also have three cats and a dog that all sleep in their bed, so I guess she and her husband have learned to sleep through minor disturbances.
Jeez...I get irked with one dog and evict him to his own bed, though sometimes he (the dog) chooses to sleep in the guest room. On the bed. Like the human he thinks he is.

My wife has a good rule-of-thumb on breastfeeding...When the child is walking and able to demand it, its time to stop it.
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Old Yesterday, 10:11 AM
 
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Co-sleeping and bed-sharing with babies and toddlers is normal and expected almost everywhere else in the world.

The myth that you can teach a young baby to self-soothe comes out of a very specific culture and is not scientific.
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Old Yesterday, 10:13 AM
 
7,477 posts, read 4,033,316 times
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"The myth that you can teach a young baby to self-soothe comes out of a very specific culture and is not scientific."

I wouldn't call it a "myth" since that's how the majority of Americans were successfully raised, at least in my generation (until attachment parenting became trendy here).
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Old Yesterday, 10:13 AM
 
4 posts, read 404 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VexedAndSolitary View Post
Yes one of my undergrad degrees is in cultural anthro. I am well aware of this.

There are reasons this is so in other cultures that do not apply to Western middle class societies.

When a Mommy blogger type does it the reasons are likely far different and far sicker (selfcenteredness, lack of boundaries, attention seeking "look at me! I still nurse! I'm so progressive and cool Let me make a blog post about it!".) etc.
Sounds like you have an axe to grind.
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Old Yesterday, 10:20 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
"The myth that you can teach a young baby to self-soothe comes out of a very specific culture and is not scientific."

I wouldn't call it a "myth" since that's how the majority of Americans were successfully raised, at least in my generation (until attachment parenting became trendy here).
We know not that self-soothing is developmental.

[url]https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/moral-landscapes/201112/dangers-crying-it-out[/url]

I understand what you're saying - yes! people have been successfully brought up all kinds of ways, but when we know better, we do better.

Child-rearing conventions are overturned all the time - when my husband was born lots of people were successfully brought up in 2nd hand smoke environments etc. etc.
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Old Yesterday, 10:27 AM
 
7,477 posts, read 4,033,316 times
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I see more disadvantages than advantages to co-sleeping, but that's just me... My point is: if you are complaining that you never get enough sleep as a result -- especially if you have to get up and go to work the next day and especially if the kid is already 18 months old -- it might be time to put a stop to it. I personally think it's harmful, unnecessary, damaging to marriages, and just plain dumb at any age, but again, to each his own.
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Old Yesterday, 10:38 AM
 
Location: New Yawk
8,744 posts, read 4,965,448 times
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How does one invoke "To each their own" while simultaneously criticizing and making assumptions?
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Old Yesterday, 11:23 AM
 
Location: NY>FL>VA>NC>IN
2,255 posts, read 846,707 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharmsCat View Post
Sounds like you have an axe to grind.
LMAOOO my disgust for attention seeking Mommy blogger types is an axe to grind?

Many "types" disgust me with whom I have never had a personal "encounter" wherefrom to develop said axe or grinding wheel.
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Old Yesterday, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
7,518 posts, read 5,551,257 times
Reputation: 10311
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharmsCat View Post
We know not that self-soothing is developmental.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/b...-crying-it-out

I understand what you're saying - yes! people have been successfully brought up all kinds of ways, but when we know better, we do better.

Child-rearing conventions are overturned all the time - when my husband was born lots of people were successfully brought up in 2nd hand smoke environments etc. etc.
Every baby is different...so there's that. But to relate co-sleeping or even letting a baby cry for awhile to secondhand smoke is ridiculous.

I also think there's a prevailing mentality in some corners of the parenting world that says, "What's best for the baby, no matter what." That's dangerous. The reason its dangerous is that it fails to weigh the negative effects on the parents, and balance them with the negative effects on the baby. Meaning, if a parent is doing something that's theoretically better for their child, with somewhat nebulous, hard-to-quantify benefits of questionable long term benefit, at very real costs to their physical or mental health, or marriage, that's ultimately not going to be good for the baby either. The implication that having your baby sleep in a crib/nursery will turn it into a mentally unhealthy adult is ridiculous.
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