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Old 03-30-2019, 06:16 AM
 
Location: Texas or Cascais, Portugal
3,290 posts, read 3,070,212 times
Reputation: 7953

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Irish Eyes View Post
1. Perhaps the family knows what you think of them.

2. I'd put the brakes on it, too if you considered my son to be spending time with YOU and his friend. They are 12. When they are together, they should be spending time together and you should be out of it.
What a bizarre statement! Some of my fondest memories of childhood are of many of my friends parents. Those who involved themselves in their kid’s lives and spent time with their kid’s friends. They exposed me to different cultural and ideological perspectives I would never have learned just from my friends. I have kept in touch with parents of childhood friends throughout my life and remember them as mentors. As I’m older now most are gone now but they helped shape the person I became. The old saying, “it takes a village” is true in my experience.
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Old Today, 04:05 PM
 
Location: NY to NJ
659 posts, read 808,340 times
Reputation: 1037
Quote:
Originally Posted by nurider2002 View Post
What a bizarre statement! Some of my fondest memories of childhood are of many of my friends parents. Those who involved themselves in their kidís lives and spent time with their kidís friends. They exposed me to different cultural and ideological perspectives I would never have learned just from my friends. I have kept in touch with parents of childhood friends throughout my life and remember them as mentors. As Iím older now most are gone now but they helped shape the person I became. The old saying, ďit takes a villageĒ is true in my experience.
Yup, I had two sets of parents who I loved hanging out with. One even drove completely out of their way to take my friend and I to a restaurant I never tried. I remember the small things. Parents that actually acknowledge their kids in their home, talk to them like people, even small kids will notice and want to be at that house. I have two super annoying neighbor kids who clearly get 0 attention from their older parents and I think if I let them, the kids would move in my house. The little girls tells me all the time how much she loves my house, invites herself over nonstop but unfortunately lacks any sort of manners. But it's not the kids fault, the parents just don't care, are always working or have their tribe of 500 relatives staying over from their homeland. Kids get no attention. Pretty sad...
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Old Today, 05:45 PM
Status: "Spring has Sprung!" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,178 posts, read 101,198,056 times
Reputation: 32654
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncole1 View Post
All of this is moot if the other kid is not coming over any more. In this situation, what goes on in their home shouldnít be messed with unless somebody needs it ( for example, if you have a reason to think there is abuse or neglect). This doesnít mean your kids canít try calling their friends once or twice to check in and make sure everything is ok.

The other issue is the normalization of car culture. A walkable neighborhood should allow kids to safely go to the park without having to walk dangerously close to a main road. This is how everybody did it 2-3 generations ago and there is no reason it shouldnít be the case today. Unfortunately, some cities just have extremely poor design in some areas, with no sidewalk or with a dangerously narrow one. Too many people think it is ok to talk on their phones or text while driving, and yet some cities just donít provide a safe place to walk, sadly.

If you live in a walkable place with less sprawl, then the kids can walk wherever they want. Responsible kids will let their parents know if they are going to be away for more than a short period of time. I think that encouraging kids to walk can be a good thing. It improves health and builds independence and character. Do we really want to be encouraging yet another generation of American citizens to be so lazy that they think you need a car to go a few blocks to the park?

Once you get out of the automobile-dependent frame of mind, all the issues become moot because you arenít taking kids anywhere, they are simply going.
I disagree. The dad was talking about for one example, a trampoline park. Does everyone have a trampoline park within walking distance? He mentions sports. Is there a sporting goods park within walking distance of everyone? Was there 2-3 generations ago?
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