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Old 04-25-2019, 01:44 PM
 
4,734 posts, read 2,095,276 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Lara is easy to mis-spell. Laura is most commonly used in the US.



Most of the above are from the 1950s and 60s. Zelda? Seriously? Why can't Hispanics use these names? Most of these are basically "English" meaning from England. What if you're Polish or German or Scandinavian?
I'm sorry, I wrote that poorly. What I meant to say but didn't make it clear, is that people with a non-British heritage who want to reflect that, should consider those names as well; I certainly DID NOT mean Hispanics shouldn't use British names.


I can see how what I wrote could easily be misinterpreted. Sorry about that.


I still think that for American parents and children living in the United States the weird made-up names should be avoided, and standard names like the ones I listed should be considered instead.
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Old 04-25-2019, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,784 posts, read 101,664,341 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
I'm sorry, I wrote that poorly. What I meant to say but didn't make it clear, is that people with a non-British heritage who want to reflect that, should consider those names as well; I certainly DID NOT mean Hispanics shouldn't use British names.


I can see how what I wrote could easily be misinterpreted. Sorry about that.


I still think that for American parents and children living in the United States the weird made-up names should be avoided, and standard names like the ones I listed should be considered instead.
OK. However, names in bold (below) are from the 1940s/50s/60s. They're just not names parents use today, or even used back in the 80s. Names in blue from the 80s (when my kids were born).

Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
Oy!

Why can't you people name your children normal names?

For non-Hispanic Americans, consider:

Mary
Joan
Alice
Barbara

Catherine (Usually with a "K")
Betty
Elizabeth
Helen
Karen

Stephanie
Ann
Carla
Dorothy
Delores

Emma
Emily
Frances
Gloria

Iris
Jean
Louise
Linda

Margaret
Melanie
Opal
Nancy
Penelope
Priscilla
Ruth
Robin
Susan
Sylvia
Phyllis
Tamara
Violet
Virginia
Yvette

Zelda

Are all names that are more or less standard. If you are Hispanic, many of these have Spanish equivalents which are generally quite mellifluous.
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Old 04-25-2019, 02:19 PM
 
4,734 posts, read 2,095,276 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
OK. However, names in bold (below) are from the 1940s/50s/60s. They're just not names parents use today, or even used back in the 80s. Names in blue from the 80s (when my kids were born).
Well, if they don't use those names today, then they will be unusual (since that seems to be what parents are going for); yet not career-limiting.


Personally I think children are people, not fashion accessories, and should not be used to show how hip, trendy, etc., their parents are.
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Old 04-25-2019, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,784 posts, read 101,664,341 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
Well, if they don't use those names today, then they will be unusual (since that seems to be what parents are going for); yet not career-limiting.


Personally I think children are people, not fashion accessories, and should not be used to show how hip, trendy, etc., their parents are.
"Linda" on a resume would be assumed to be in her 60s (at least). HR people expect young applicants to be named Emma, Hannah, Madison, Ashley (the most popular girls' names of 2000). Or, Jessica, Ashley, Brittany and Amanda from 1990.
Here Are The Most Popular Baby Names From 1990 - Pretty52
Top 1000 popular babynames in 2000 - BabyNames.it - 100% American baby name
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Old 04-25-2019, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,083 posts, read 13,854,158 times
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I pick up the grands at school, and I see what names are popular. The names that so many of you hate, are being used frequently. I suspect the name, Sophia is waning in popularity. But the names I see seem Asian, or made up or old. It does not matter what we older folks think; new parents like unique (to them) names. And since most young parents will have only one or two kids, they attach real significance to the names they choose.

The names I abhored as a young mother, have come back into use. They seem fresh and new to new parents.
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Old 04-25-2019, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,784 posts, read 101,664,341 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I pick up the grands at school, and I see what names are popular. The names that so many of you hate, are being used frequently. I suspect the name, Sophia is waning in popularity. But the names I see seem Asian, or made up or old. It does not matter what we older folks think; new parents like unique (to them) names. And since most young parents will have only one or two kids, they attach real significance to the names they choose.

The names I abhored as a young mother, have come back into use. They seem fresh and new to new parents.
Sophia is still #2. In fact when you add up the two spellings (Sofia #16), it's #1. Then there's Sophie (#77).
https://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/d...ames2010s.html
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Old 04-26-2019, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
54,630 posts, read 53,453,765 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Lara is easy to mis-spell. Laura is most commonly used in the US.



Most of the above are from the 1950s and 60s. Zelda? Seriously? Why can't Hispanics use these names? Most of these are basically "English" meaning from England. What if you're Polish or German or Scandinavian?
My reaction, too. I have a neighbor who has an older sister named Zelda. Zelda is 82 years old. (She calls her "Zellie".) Whenever she talks about her, I think "whatever could make someone give such a hideous name to a little baby girl".
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Old 04-26-2019, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
54,630 posts, read 53,453,765 times
Reputation: 64365
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I pick up the grands at school, and I see what names are popular. The names that so many of you hate, are being used frequently. I suspect the name, Sophia is waning in popularity. But the names I see seem Asian, or made up or old. It does not matter what we older folks think; new parents like unique (to them) names. And since most young parents will have only one or two kids, they attach real significance to the names they choose.

The names I abhored as a young mother, have come back into use. They seem fresh and new to new parents.
My mother is Charlotte. She is 90 years old. Her aunt was Charlotte, her grandmother was Charlotte, and her great-grandmother was Charlotte. She always hated having what she thought of as an old-lady name.

Now she amused but shocked that the name came back into play and was even given to one of the young Brit princesses.
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Old Today, 02:13 AM
 
1 posts
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I don`t no, It's original
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Old Today, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,784 posts, read 101,664,341 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
My mother is Charlotte. She is 90 years old. Her aunt was Charlotte, her grandmother was Charlotte, and her great-grandmother was Charlotte. She always hated having what she thought of as an old-lady name.

Now she amused but shocked that the name came back into play and was even given to one of the young Brit princesses.
It's very popular in the US as well right now, #8.
https://www.babycenter.com/baby-names-charlotte-954.htm

My daughter won't tell us what she's planning to name her baby, due in July. I can't wait! (Well, I can wait, we don't want a preemie.)
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