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Old 04-19-2019, 10:01 AM
 
5,077 posts, read 2,104,573 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by veuvegirl View Post
If people read the OP she clearly stated it may change, but wants to help her now. Nothing wrong with that. I say kudos to the OP helping her daughter explore the possibilities!

It's the 'steering towards vet school' that's the rub. A little early for that kind of road to be mapped out. Let kids be kids.
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Old 04-19-2019, 10:10 AM
 
Location: League City, Texas
2,867 posts, read 4,528,517 times
Reputation: 5949
Quote:
Originally Posted by KaraG View Post
Why would you think you would have to buy the ranch for your daughter when she's an adult?

Your resources shouldn't have any bearing on what she does when she is grown up, it's her life.
This ^^. I can’t even begin to understand why you would even entertain such foolishness. She’s eleven.

Please just let her be a kid. Seriously—almost all girls go through a horsey phase. Get her some riding lessons, and horse books. By next year, it could be something else.

I wouldn’t be surprised if you rethink buying a working adult a ranch.
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Old 04-19-2019, 11:10 AM
Status: "NO Biden!; (or any other Democrat)" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,109 posts, read 7,319,602 times
Reputation: 15654
As a follow-up to Post # 11 -- too many people not directly exposed to the veterinary field have a distorted view of what it's like on a day-to-day basis; most vets don't live in comfortable suburbs and deal exclusively with dogs, cats, puppies and kittens for generous fees.

Along Interstate 90 somewhere in South Dakota, there used to be a billboard that read, in essence; "This is a livestock state; please take your ideas about animal rights back where you came from after your vacation". And a fair number of veterinary graduates will spend their days in "animal industry" -- if for no other reason than that USDA service offers stable salaries (often in areas where the cost of living isn't that steep) and excellent health care and other benefits.

The two veterinarians with whom I'm acquainted have dealt with small animals in consumer-type practices, but not for long. They have an adult son with special needs, and have supplemented their incomes by working at horse-racing venues (presence of a veterinarian is state-mandated, and occasionally, an injured horse has to be humanely "put down"), by tending to farm animals (male veal calves and piglets have to be castrated, and all of them have to be vaccinated), by testing freshly-killed cattle and poultry for disease -- and a lot of other "un-romantic" duties. After a long and wide variety of exposures (which proved useful in the predatory culture of a bureaucracy) one made it to a top-level post as "State Veterinarian", but it was the days in the abattoir and the chicken plant that made that possible.

These are the realities of daily life for a substantial number, possibly the majority of those in the veterinary profession.

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 04-19-2019 at 11:33 AM..
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Old 04-19-2019, 12:43 PM
 
888 posts, read 506,281 times
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Have your daughter do camps at ranches. If possible have her go to a working ranch and see the day to day realities, or have her observe a vet during their daily work. Go online and research the time and cost it takes to get through vet school (not to mention the requirements just to get into school). My daughter also wanted to be a veterinarian at that age because she loves animals too.

I grew up on a dairy farm. Being a vet for ranch/farm animals is tough, dirty work. You can be called out in the middle of the night for all sorts of emergencies. I helped my dad deliver calves on a cold, Christmas Eve, in a barn with manure, and let me tell you that is anything but glamorous or easy. You can be a vet for house animals and keep a better schedule but vet school is very expensive and the salaries do NOT match that of regular doctors. If she wants to own a ranch have her pursue some other career where she will make the money to afford that.
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Old 04-19-2019, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Washington state
5,241 posts, read 2,645,631 times
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Most people think being a vet is about working with animals. I love animals, but decided against being a vet when I saw the job was medical and dealing with people, neither of which I like. So I gave it a hard pass.
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Old 04-19-2019, 05:55 PM
 
7,228 posts, read 11,351,944 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unbeliever View Post
Hi,

I have an 11 year old daughter who's an animal lover. Aren't they all? She's very smart, talented, and beautiful. Aren't they all?

Anyway, her goal is to have a horse ranch someday, which I can't really help with. I live in Colorado, but I'm originally from NYC, and I wouldn't know a ranch from an iceberg. I won't have the resources to buy a ranch, and my daughter knows that.

I've tried to steer her towards Vet school, thinking that would be make sense, that she could be the vet in a small town or rural area, and that she could buy some land and start her ranch that way. However, she doesn't want to do all the yucky stuff, surgeries, etc.

Any ideas regarding how I can help at this point? My daughter's ok with her dream ranch being in Wyoming, North Dakota, etc. I'm interested in any colleges that offer programs that might steer her on her way. She's been volunteering at a local farm, but there must be more she can do. At this point, I'd say "get a degree in Animal Science or something and an MBA to teach you how to run a farm/ranch."

And yes, I realize that she may do a 180 and end up on a completely different path, but you have to have a plan, even if we know what happens to plans.

Thanks for your help.

JB
Way too young.

There's exceptions, but most people figure out what they want to do (or should do) in adulthood. Some MUCH later than others.

But I don't really believe you can figure out what you want to do until you figure out where you want to be in this world, which means ... how much $ do you need to make, how many material things do you need, what is your need for status, do you want to help others, or do you want to help yourself, etc.

Children have no idea what being a doctor, lawyer, engineer is, and most of those jobs are very different from what people believe them to be, especially lawyer, pfft, wow...

My only suggestion would be to keep exposing her to new things and maybe she'll really develop a passion for something.
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Old 04-19-2019, 06:51 PM
 
10,301 posts, read 8,230,689 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hellpaso View Post
This ^^. I can’t even begin to understand why you would even entertain such foolishness. She’s eleven.

Please just let her be a kid. Seriously—almost all girls go through a horsey phase. Get her some riding lessons, and horse books. By next year, it could be something else.

I wouldn’t be surprised if you rethink buying a working adult a ranch.
Yes! Finally!! There's a mention of horse books!

Lots of young girls dearly love horses - or the idea of horses. Fortunately, there are lots of good juvenile novels about horses - try Marguerite Henry's many books, Walter Farley's Black Stallion series, and ask your daughter's school or public children's librarian for additional suggestions. The libraries will have non-fiction books about horses as well. Your daughter will learn about horses and much more - all for free.

Riding lessons are great if you can swing them.

Oh, and plan a family trip to Lexington, Kentucky, to visit the Kentucky Horse Park, which has over 200 breeds of horses plus three museums dealing with horses, horse shows, horse-drawn trolleys, trail rides, and much more.
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Old 04-19-2019, 09:48 PM
 
Location: WI
2,867 posts, read 3,175,359 times
Reputation: 5017
Yes, 11 is way too young to be thinking of specific career paths/programs/etc. Let her do what she likes and get back to this question in oh, 5 years...if she even has this interest in 5 years!



On the subject of becoming a vet- my neighbor is a small animal vet at a very nice clinic and says she would never ever encourage her children to pursue veterinary medicine. So there's that.
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Old 04-19-2019, 10:03 PM
Status: "Re-edit status" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Was Midvalley Oregon; Now Eastside Seattle area
3,749 posts, read 1,722,206 times
Reputation: 2877
hint; We sold our small acreage to a local who grew up in the neighborhood. In 12 months, He put in a large enclosed arena with 20 stalls, 4 corrals, paved parking for 30, a house with pool, a seasonal.pond, 4 acres of wine grapes ( pinot noir country), dirt bike trails on the back 3 on the steep slope hills. All for his wife, daughter + son-in-law+ grand children.
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Old 04-22-2019, 10:13 AM
 
100 posts, read 30,515 times
Reputation: 353
As a parent who has what your daughter desires.... I would let her dream, vocally support any efforts on her part within reason, not interfere, BUT... if she wants something she should work for it herself. There is nothing cheap about her aspirations. Whether it is owning/caring for horses, owning a working ranch/farm or going on to college and obtaining a professional degree....it is all very costly, time consuming and much hard work. She has to want to put in the effort to obtain and achieve it all. No one can do it for her.

Last edited by CentralUSHomeowner; 04-22-2019 at 11:08 AM..
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