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Old Yesterday, 06:38 AM
 
1,110 posts, read 625,503 times
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I purchased this book (link below) last summer after my child completed preschool. We were very disciplined and did a lesson every night. The lessons took 15 minutes on average. It can be tempting to skip ahead when it seems easy, but it's important to go through all of them. It is also important to read the parent's section at the beginning of the book and prepare yourself a couple of days before beginning.

My son actually enjoyed it and he would ask when it was time to do a lesson. It was very successful and he was reading by the time he started kindergarten next fall. I plan on going through the lessons with his little sister when she is a bit older. The lessons are designed so that the child will be reading simple words and sentences early on. I think those early successes are important to build confidence. The child does not need to know all of the letters or sounds going in.

I promise you I'm not affiliated with this book in any way, it just worked very well for us so I sing its praises.

https://www.amazon.com/Teach-Your-Ch.../dp/0671631985
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Old Yesterday, 06:40 AM
 
1,110 posts, read 625,503 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by somebodynew View Post
4 is awfully young! Don't set up reading as a chore! Read TO him. At that age, pointing things out in the world, like road signs, was fun.
I should have mentioned this in my previous post about the lessons I did with my son prior to kindergarten. He showed a real interest in letter sounds and reading. I took it as an opportunity to get him started with reading. I don't think I would have pushed it on him if he showed no interest.
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Old Yesterday, 07:24 AM
 
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He’s really young in terms of being expected to read. When he gets to Kindergarten, some of his peers will already be reading but most won’t. I don’t see any reason to be pushing it at 4. I would just keep reading to him, maybe see if the library has the book packs where he can look at the book and listen to it on audio at the same time. There’s also a fun free phonics and reading app called, “Teach Your Monster To Read”. If he likes to play games on the computer he’d probably like this one a lot. However, I would not worry at all at age four.
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Old Yesterday, 07:30 AM
 
9,395 posts, read 5,660,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clawsondude View Post
I purchased this book (link below) last summer after my child completed preschool. We were very disciplined and did a lesson every night. The lessons took 15 minutes on average. It can be tempting to skip ahead when it seems easy, but it's important to go through all of them. It is also important to read the parent's section at the beginning of the book and prepare yourself a couple of days before beginning.

My son actually enjoyed it and he would ask when it was time to do a lesson. It was very successful and he was reading by the time he started kindergarten next fall. I plan on going through the lessons with his little sister when she is a bit older. The lessons are designed so that the child will be reading simple words and sentences early on. I think those early successes are important to build confidence. The child does not need to know all of the letters or sounds going in.

I promise you I'm not affiliated with this book in any way, it just worked very well for us so I sing its praises.

https://www.amazon.com/Teach-Your-Ch.../dp/0671631985
We tried to use this book. It was ultimately too dry for us. I dreaded it and so did my daughter so we didn’t get far but it truly is a great, tried and true method in term of teaching kids to learn how to read. It’s also one of the most affordable options for teaching reading using a phonics based approach and you can find this book in most libraries. I know people who had great success with it.
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Old Yesterday, 07:40 AM
 
1,110 posts, read 625,503 times
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Originally Posted by MissTerri View Post
We tried to use this book. It was ultimately too dry for us. I dreaded it and so did my daughter so we didn’t get far but it truly is a great, tried and true method in term of teaching kids to learn how to read. It’s also one of the most affordable options for teaching reading using a phonics based approach and you can find this book in most libraries. I know people who had great success with it.
I absolutely agree about the "dryness". If he hadn't been interested there is no way we would have made it past lesson 10. Like you said though, very tried and true method! We did break up the monotony by reading some Bob Books as well.
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Old Yesterday, 08:02 AM
 
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My siblings learned to read very naturally, with me reading to them constantly. Hours a day, I'd say. I grew up in a very religious home, where TV was just not allowed except for some select movies and PBS shows. I read them primers we had from the 50s (re-prints)... they were actually very interesting stories, as the reading level grew. You can skip the religious stories, if you'd like.

I would read, in an animated way, and answer questions when they asked. They seemed to read without learning the letters alone. The pictures were great and the stories move right along. I'll sometimes borrow my mother's books from then, just to read the stories. When they wanted to repeat a story or book, we would. It would be dozens of stories in a paperback. Faith & Freedom Reader Series (19 Book Set) - Seton Educational Media I'm sure you can get them cheaper online, used. They're just good stories of the 40s and 50s, with satisfying endings. Easy reading, to a graduated reading level. Even if you keep reading through, beyond THEIR level, it makes them want to re-read on their own. Look at me... a 35 yo, agnostic mother of teenagers, wanting to borrow these stories to re-read them as a comfort.
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Old Yesterday, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
41,837 posts, read 40,624,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clawsondude View Post

I don't think I would have pushed it on him if he showed no interest.
This is the real key to teaching a child to read.

Even though I read to him often, my youngest son, who is a successful high school student now, would get mad at me if I told him to read to me during preschool. He absolutely did not care that he could not read until second grade, when he noticed that his friends were reading higher-level books in the library, based on the color-coded shelves they were allowed to choose from during library time.

He is quite competitive and his own self-motivation (along with sight words and One Fish, Two Fish ) got him on track. But there is no way I could have (or would have) sat him down at age four and forced him to learn.
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Old Yesterday, 09:57 AM
 
100 posts, read 30,515 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dad01 View Post
My child is in pre-school
and doing ok for his age , in the middle for most activities
but his reading needs most improvement
we sit and try to practice the words but it seems like a chore to him

any ideas how to make it more fun and engaging ? he recognizes all letters and some words but has problem reading words , the teachers have no expressed major concerns yet but i see this is going to be a problem in the future unless i do more now

thanks

Absolutely nothing wrong with early instruction for your child. Our kids were reading by the time they started Kindergarten. They attended Kindergarten......but only for a half day session. After that they grade skipped into second grade.

We limited tv and video game time. Our kids had full access to many "hands on" toys, puzzles, art supplies and books. They also had many pets to learn about and care for. Cattle, horses, cats, dog, fish, birds and rabbits. Learning was a daily part of their lives. They did not fear learning/education.

Last edited by CentralUSHomeowner; Yesterday at 10:34 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 12:38 PM
 
Location: Chicago area
14,078 posts, read 7,737,293 times
Reputation: 52623
I have a 6 year old in my life that I met at 4. She wants me all to herself and we often go on adventure walks together. She was very inquisitive at 4 and more so now at 6. We talked about everything and her favorite expression is "and what else." Take your son on adventure walks and explore as much of nature as you can. Bring a magnifying glass and just look at bugs and flowers. He will have questions and the words will flow between both of you. By all means use big words and explain them. Use the books to explain what you saw in person. You need to spark that need for knowledge vs turning it into a chore. Learning can be fun. The 6 year old has an amazing vocabulary. Their minds are like little sponges. You just have to find the right way to feed it.
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Old Yesterday, 06:01 PM
 
415 posts, read 267,288 times
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I have a friend who is a reading specialist that says under no circumstances should boys be "forced" to read (unless they show interest on their own) until the end of 2nd grade. Of course, this doesn't fit with the curriculum in today's schools, as we are moving further and further away from developmentally appropriate learning (especially with regard to reading), so many parents unnecessarily stress out. She also says that learning disorders excluded, by the end of 3rd grade, most of the kids level out with regard to reading ability. I have 2 boys that are radically different with regard to reading. One read early, on his own, and loved it. The other HATED it until the end of 1st grade, when it was like a light switch turned on and he started requesting books we hadn't even heard of before. They had the same environment with 2 parents who are book-obsessed and read to them every night since they were old enough to sit still for a half second. So, I don't think there is any magic formula. I do agree with other posters that 4 is awfully young to be worried about reading ability and if the school hasn't expressed any concerns, you do not need to stress yourself out. Both my husband and my father, who have multiple graduate and professional degrees between them and are avid readers, did not enjoy reading until high school or later. Don't force it. But modelling an appreciation of reading is always a good start.
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