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Old 05-03-2019, 12:38 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
5,022 posts, read 5,264,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
That's true but to be honest, around here, the only activities accepted as being "masculine" enough for boys seems to be football or baseball.

I have also heard of boys being bullied for being mathematically gifted or playing musical instruments.
I'm sorry.
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Old 05-03-2019, 01:37 PM
 
274 posts, read 195,756 times
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Do we ask society permission for our daughters to play masculine sports like basketball, softball and soccer? Why is it fine if girls do masculine things but wrong for boys to do feminine things?

What is shows is that male deviance from male norms is more offensive to society than female deviance from female norms. And most importantly, it shows that men are still superior to women as they are supposed to make the rules in society with more seriousness. Males doing only male things keeps men more in power. Women can deviate from female norms with some real negative consequence; however, society won't be as offended because women are not as important overall as men in the power structure/dynamic. That's the issue at hand, I'm afraid.


Most of those girls are only doing these sports is because their parents and society pushed them into it. I think that is the case for many boys who play sports as well.


Back to the OP: I wish your son all the success in his dancing hobby. Just make sure he loves it. If he does, let him pursue with passion. If he loves it enough, it won't matter as much what others think. What are thoughts anyways? Just do what you love.
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Old 05-03-2019, 03:13 PM
 
6,034 posts, read 3,434,956 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFlyingBird View Post
Out of curiosity I googled this. Always like to have my stereotypes swept away.

There has been little study of this. I did find one paper by National Institute of Health.


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9251839
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Old 05-04-2019, 11:14 AM
Status: "here we go again" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
8,974 posts, read 3,393,649 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrancaisDeutsch View Post
Most of those girls are only doing these sports is because their parents and society pushed them into it. I think that is the case for many boys who play sports as well. .
Football is big where I live and boys are often pushed into it, and get all kinds of permanent injuries. And we live in a society that worships athletes, for whatever reason.

Many sports are even more time consuming and costly than dance, music, fine arts. Club sports in my area can cost $3,000 a year or more. A once a week dance class would be around $900 a year.
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Old 05-04-2019, 12:03 PM
 
274 posts, read 195,756 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
Football is big where I live and boys are often pushed into it, and get all kinds of permanent injuries. And we live in a society that worships athletes, for whatever reason.

Many sports are even more time consuming and costly than dance, music, fine arts. Club sports in my area can cost $3,000 a year or more. A once a week dance class would be around $900 a year.
Very true what you say. Parents living vicariously through their kids? I think so. Athlete worship? Yep, at every turn.

Family values/church agenda + sports/athlete worship. Not sure how you can reconcile the two, but.... A professional football/baseball game? All the alcohol, cursing...plus all the millions and millions of dollars spent running around on a field and throwing balls.

The culture is what the cultures is. Cultures change slowly.

I simply say that if your child enjoys it, then it is fine, provided he or she understands that it is just a game, and that mental/physical injuries are out of the question.

America has lost all common sense.
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Old 05-07-2019, 01:32 PM
 
9,054 posts, read 13,164,703 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
Tap might be better. I'm a little worried that he will be bullied if he takes up ballet. Even though I would not stop him from wanting to do it, if that's what his interest was.

I mean ballet is fine for boys, but he might be a lil more interested in tap or jazz or something. Engage his interests & see!


Many schools will offer a trial class for the kids to try & see if they like it before you sign him up, pay & commit.
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Old 05-07-2019, 03:37 PM
 
3,460 posts, read 4,880,288 times
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The famous Broadway play (and movie) "Billy Elliott" (sp?) was about a British boy from a rough coal-mining family, who took ballet lessons instead of boxing lessons, and ended up as the star dancer with the national royal troupe.
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Old 05-07-2019, 05:21 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
77,079 posts, read 69,022,989 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
The famous Broadway play (and movie) "Billy Elliott" (sp?) was about a British boy from a rough coal-mining family, who took ballet lessons instead of boxing lessons, and ended up as the star dancer with the national royal troupe.
Billy knew what he wanted! Good for him! How old was he, when he started studying dance?
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Old 05-08-2019, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Caverns measureless to man...
7,200 posts, read 4,569,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
I don't know but the most famous male ballet dancers I can think of are womanizers, same with the guy that does the Irish step dancing shows. Far from being gay.
My high school girlfriend was a dancer, so I used to hang out with her friends and their boyfriends. Every boy who was in the dance classes had a girlfriend who was a dancer, and those boys were the envy of the whole school. All the football players wanted their girlfriends, and the football players' girlfriends all wanted to be the dancers' girlfriends. Most guys in our school did not in our school seriously question the sexuality of the dance boys!

I do remember one boy named Chuck, who was medium height, very slender and graceful... had an elegant and artistic way of moving his body, very expressive and fluid in his movements, had a sort of European style about him... his mother was one of our art teachers, from France... one day some redneck dipstick came up behind him in the hallway, gave him a shove, and said, "hey, ******!" Chuck turned around, and without hesitation started walking purposefully toward the bully - peeling his shirt off as he walked. The bully took one look at his physique, and literally ran! Chuck chased him halfway down the hall before the kid took refuge in Chuck's mother's classroom, and nobody ever gave him any crap after that.


Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
That's what a teenage boy told me. He's a dancer. He's gotten flak about it from other guys at school.

I knew a boy in middle school who took ballroom dancing.. He had seen the movie Saturday Night Fever and was into disco style dancing as well. He was bullied because of this. I don't want to set my kid up to be a bully magnet. So it's a valid concern.
And of course, that's the reality of living in Texas. So yeah, I totally understand where you're coming from.

Has he any interest in any kind of sports? If he came up through school as both a dancer and, say, baseball player, might that make a difference?




Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFlyingBird View Post
Forget about genders...there is no gender in dance. And if he is the only boy, he gets his own special parts.
Well, if he's a boy, he already has his own special parts. At least, that's the way I always understood it.
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Old Yesterday, 01:01 PM
Status: "here we go again" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
8,974 posts, read 3,393,649 times
Reputation: 18570
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. In-Between View Post

And of course, that's the reality of living in Texas. So yeah, I totally understand where you're coming from.

Has he any interest in any kind of sports? If he came up through school as both a dancer and, say, baseball player, might that make a difference?
I would like to see if he is interested in baseball, football or soccer.

Many kids at his school come from countries where football is not the big thing. Most of these kids are in martial arts. Yes, it's Texas but he goes to a diverse school. Now I'm think he wouldn't get too much flak if he took dance classes.
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