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Old Yesterday, 12:21 PM
Status: "Loved my 1927 Craftsman Bungalow!" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Virginia
3,811 posts, read 1,921,983 times
Reputation: 10409

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Quote:
Originally Posted by parentologist View Post
The only drink to be consumed between meals is water. Not diluted juice. Not milk. Not flavored water. JUST PLAIN WATER, and nothing else.

The only snacks to be had between meals are fresh fruits and fresh vegetables. Not "fruit snacks". Not dried fruit. Not goldfish. Not "veggie sticks". JUST FRESH FRUITS AND FRESH VEGETABLES, and nothing else.

Offer a glass of milk with meals. Only with meals.

Brush and floss carefully after breakfast, and before bed, using flossing sticks, and an electric, rechargeable vibrating toothbrush. I recommend the Oral B one, because it has a tiny head that fits in little mouths.

If your child resists brushing, try every trick you can to get child to cooperate. Let child brush YOUR teeth with YOUR tootbrush, while you are brushing his teeth with his. But if no matter what, the child fights you, then do it with two people - one to pin the kid, the other to brush, or sit on the kid, pinning the arms to the side with your knees, and brush.

It sounds horrible. I've been there, done that, and it feels like assault. It IS assault! But the alternative is that they wind up needing to go under general anesthesia to have their rotted baby teeth drilled out of their heads, which is a whole lot worse in my opinion.

Bottle rot is totally preventable. Institute these measures from early on, and it won't happen. Institute these measures at the first sign of it, and it won't get much worse, the baby teeth will survive until they fall out naturally. Or continue with the behavior that caused it in the first place, and the kid will wind up under general for extensive dental work. And if you're not on Medicaid (which virtually all my clients with bottle rot were), it will be very, very expensive! Not covered by private insurances.

A lot of pediatricians and pediatric dentists are now painting flouride varnish on the teeth, to try to prevent this. If you care for the teeth as above, bottle rot is extremely unlikely. But it's a good preventative, and Medicaid covers it.
If all that were true, I wouldn't still have a baby tooth at age 68. True, it does have a single filling, but it's otherwise intact and thriving.
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Old Yesterday, 12:23 PM
 
Location: here
24,837 posts, read 29,766,611 times
Reputation: 32353
Quote:
Originally Posted by YorktownGal View Post
Toddlers have their teeth drilled, sometimes the only option is to remove them.


The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that babies give up the bottle entirely by about age 1, and no later than 18 months. Obviously, if the child continues, there will be dental issues.
The poster sounded extremely judgy an incorrectly said they have teeth "drilled out of their head." they either clean them up with a drill to fill the cavities, or they pull the teeth. There is no such thing as "drilling teeth out of your head." It was an unnecessary exaggeration for the purpose of shaming the OP.
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Old Yesterday, 12:51 PM
 
15,853 posts, read 17,628,875 times
Reputation: 15635
Quote:
Originally Posted by YorktownGal View Post
Toddlers have their teeth drilled, sometimes the only option is to remove them.


The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that babies give up the bottle entirely by about age 1, and no later than 18 months. Obviously, if the child continues, there will be dental issues.
It is not a one size fits all. My autistic grandson had a bottle even at 3, but has no dental issues from that. He has had dental issues because he inherited his dad's big teeth in a small mouth, but that has nothing to do with the bottle.
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Old Yesterday, 01:15 PM
 
731 posts, read 213,552 times
Reputation: 1589
Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
It is not a one size fits all. My autistic grandson had a bottle even at 3, but has no dental issues from that. He has had dental issues because he inherited his dad's big teeth in a small mouth, but that has nothing to do with the bottle.
Just quoting from The American Academy of Pediatrics. Just the messenger.
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Old Today, 01:08 AM
 
9,130 posts, read 10,744,633 times
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My understanding, and granted this is from 20 years ago, bottle rot (as we called it) happens when babies and toddlers have a bottle of juice/drink/formula almost constantly in their mouth, even while sleeping. The sugars, with formula, juice, or even breast milk, just surround the baby teeth (and developing teeth) and can cause decay. Once again this is from 20+ years ago, my kid's pediatrician suggested no bottle propping.
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Old Today, 03:18 PM
 
10,169 posts, read 6,940,414 times
Reputation: 23906
Its genetic, I am 100% positive of it. Of course, some can be tooth rot from constant drinks with sugar and not brushing. But I am positive its genetic. Or something. It isn't just a habit or hygiene.

My son is adopted, but he had several bad baby teeth. We brushed twice a day, I did it for him. Since his first tooth. He didn't get juice and was weaned from his bottle/paci right at 12 months old. His first bite of refined sugar was his first birthday cake. He ended up having to go under general at the children's hospital to remove two teeth and place spacers because they were deformed. He also had a LOAD of cavities they filled at the same time. The dentist said it was like genetic or the birth mother got a virus (like a cold) at a time his teeth were developing...or something like that. Good news is he has not yet had a cavity in his adult teeth...funny thing, I can hardly get him to brush his teeth (sensory issues).

My daughter...she got lots more sugar at an earlier age, she stayed on a bottle until 2 years old 4x a day (her doctor said to because of a health issue and being quite thin). Then she used her sippee cup as a bottle with chocolate almond milk until she was 5 years old (also doc recommended, but she sucked on it like a bottle). She also got watered down juice until she was 5 in her sippee cup. She also fought me about teeth brushing. And she still hates it and I have to bribe her to do it. She has yet to have a cavity. But she has braces and my son won't need them.

It was the same with me and my sis. She was manic about oral hygiene, didnt like sweets, etc. Tons of cavities. I hated brushing my teeth so I always did a bad job...just good enough on the front for my mom to approve of. I loved sweets. I didnt get my first cavity until I was almost 40. And it was tiny.

And again...my best friend had one child with perfect teeth, and one who got a cavity in every single baby tooth...he looked like he had a "grill". Nothing was different about the way she fed them or cared for their teeth.

So...yeah, some bad habits can cause tooth decay. But also, there has to be a strong genetic factor. Or a virus...something.
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