U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-03-2019, 01:56 AM
 
1 posts, read 259 times
Reputation: 10

Advertisements

Hi
My baby turns 3 year last month.Almost all her baby teeth has developed.But the issue is she has decay in her baby teeth. We recently consulted a [url=https://www.pearldentalburlington.com/]dental clinic in Burlington[/url]. Our dentist said that Baby bottle tooth decay happens when a baby's teeth are in frequent contact with sugary drinks and milk.
We don’t let her drink a lot of juice. I really got worried when I heard it. That's why I'm sharing this valuable information to you. What is your opinion about this?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-03-2019, 04:28 PM
 
Location: here
24,837 posts, read 29,766,611 times
Reputation: 32353
What does it matter what our opinion is? You have the expert opinion of your dentist. I assume you have a treatment plan. I hope you plan to cut back on the juice and milk. From my own experience, I now that those aren't the only factors. My son had a lot of cavities and we never let him lie down with a bottle, or anything. He just had weak teeth. We got the back ones filled and we left the front ones until they fell out on their own. The first dentist wanted to pull them, and we did not allow that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2019, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
1,955 posts, read 782,348 times
Reputation: 3483
It usually happens when you let them have a bottle when they should be off of it. Not taking care of decay in baby teeth can affect the adult teeth in a few different ways. Different dentists have different opinions. Get more than one consult.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2019, 05:49 AM
 
4,084 posts, read 3,677,957 times
Reputation: 11122
The only drink to be consumed between meals is water. Not diluted juice. Not milk. Not flavored water. JUST PLAIN WATER, and nothing else.

The only snacks to be had between meals are fresh fruits and fresh vegetables. Not "fruit snacks". Not dried fruit. Not goldfish. Not "veggie sticks". JUST FRESH FRUITS AND FRESH VEGETABLES, and nothing else.

Offer a glass of milk with meals. Only with meals.

Brush and floss carefully after breakfast, and before bed, using flossing sticks, and an electric, rechargeable vibrating toothbrush. I recommend the Oral B one, because it has a tiny head that fits in little mouths.

If your child resists brushing, try every trick you can to get child to cooperate. Let child brush YOUR teeth with YOUR tootbrush, while you are brushing his teeth with his. But if no matter what, the child fights you, then do it with two people - one to pin the kid, the other to brush, or sit on the kid, pinning the arms to the side with your knees, and brush.

It sounds horrible. I've been there, done that, and it feels like assault. It IS assault! But the alternative is that they wind up needing to go under general anesthesia to have their rotted baby teeth drilled out of their heads, which is a whole lot worse in my opinion.

Bottle rot is totally preventable. Institute these measures from early on, and it won't happen. Institute these measures at the first sign of it, and it won't get much worse, the baby teeth will survive until they fall out naturally. Or continue with the behavior that caused it in the first place, and the kid will wind up under general for extensive dental work. And if you're not on Medicaid (which virtually all my clients with bottle rot were), it will be very, very expensive! Not covered by private insurances.

A lot of pediatricians and pediatric dentists are now painting flouride varnish on the teeth, to try to prevent this. If you care for the teeth as above, bottle rot is extremely unlikely. But it's a good preventative, and Medicaid covers it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 06:36 AM
 
7,866 posts, read 9,510,850 times
Reputation: 13744
Quote:
Originally Posted by parentologist View Post

Brush and floss carefully after breakfast, and before bed, using flossing sticks, and an electric, rechargeable vibrating toothbrush. I recommend the Oral B one, because it has a tiny head that fits in little mouths.

If your child resists brushing, try every trick you can to get child to cooperate. Let child brush YOUR teeth with YOUR tootbrush, while you are brushing his teeth with his. But if no matter what, the child fights you, then do it with two people - one to pin the kid, the other to brush, or sit on the kid, pinning the arms to the side with your knees, and brush.

It sounds horrible. I've been there, done that, and it feels like assault. It IS assault! But the alternative is that they wind up needing to go under general anesthesia to have their rotted baby teeth drilled out of their heads, which is a whole lot worse in my opinion.
OMG, seriously?? So the only two options are assaulting a child or getting baby teeth drilled out? I've never known a parent to be so aggressive with feeding and cleaning, and I've never known a child to have to get their baby teeth drilled out.... .so there is obviously a middle ground here ..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 08:50 AM
 
102 posts, read 31,217 times
Reputation: 353
Quote:
Originally Posted by spencgr View Post
OMG, seriously?? So the only two options are assaulting a child or getting baby teeth drilled out? I've never known a parent to be so aggressive with feeding and cleaning, and I've never known a child to have to get their baby teeth drilled out.... .so there is obviously a middle ground here ..

Our kids made it into adulthood with NO cavities. Their trips to the dentist started when they were two (youngest started at 18 months) and regular visits took place throughout their young lives. When they were small...water always followed nursing, bottle or sippy cup. Early on a washcloth was used to gently clean and then a small soft toothbrush was introduced later.

Sadly kids with decay (bottle mouth) in their baby teeth is very common condition/problem due to lifestyle choices and then compounded by the inability or lack of effort to seek out dental care (dental care is expensive, but more costly as an adult trying to make up for past lack of care). The approach taken in dealing with a kid that has decay depends on the dentist and his methods of treatment. Some dentists can be very proactive in preventing decay if parents seek our care early and at the other end of the spectrum some dentists can be overly aggressive/motivated by money. As a parent you have to be responsible, educated and proactive in learning about your child's health care needs early on.

There can also be issues with teeth in a child that has nothing to do with parental care and is due to in utero development or a genetic disease/disorder. I have a niece that was born with a genetic disorder that impacted her tooth development/enamel.

Also, if a family is on city water that has no fluoride in the water or on well water... they should consult a dentist. It can make a huge difference in the health of a developing child's teeth.

Last edited by CentralUSHomeowner; Yesterday at 10:02 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 10:34 AM
 
7,866 posts, read 9,510,850 times
Reputation: 13744
Quote:
Originally Posted by CentralUSHomeowner View Post
Our kids made it into adulthood with NO cavities. Their trips to the dentist started when they were two (youngest started at 18 months) and regular visits took place throughout their young lives. When they were small...water always followed nursing, bottle or sippy cup. Early on a washcloth was used to gently clean and then a small soft toothbrush was introduced later.

Sadly kids with decay (bottle mouth) in their baby teeth is very common condition/problem due to lifestyle choices and then compounded by the inability or lack of effort to seek out dental care (dental care is expensive, but more costly as an adult trying to make up for past lack of care). The approach taken in dealing with a kid that has decay depends on the dentist and his methods of treatment. Some dentists can be very proactive in preventing decay if parents seek our care early and at the other end of the spectrum some dentists can be overly aggressive/motivated by money. As a parent you have to be responsible, educated and proactive in learning about your child's health care needs early on.

There can also be issues with teeth in a child that has nothing to do with parental care and is due to in utero development or a genetic disease/disorder. I have a niece that was born with a genetic disorder that impacted her tooth development/enamel.

Also, if a family is on city water that has no fluoride in the water or on well water... they should consult a dentist. It can make a huge difference in the health of a developing child's teeth.
I am not saying dental care isn't important, but the previous poster said you have to assault (her word, not mine) your child or else your child is getting their teeth drilled out. It is simply not true. My parents advocated tooth brushing, but it was more along the lines of "so have you brushed?". We went to the dentist regularly. But we also had juice occasionally and (OMG!) candy! And I have never had a cavity.

Such an extreme view that one must be done to prevent the other is simply wrong.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 10:49 AM
 
Location: here
24,837 posts, read 29,766,611 times
Reputation: 32353
Quote:
Originally Posted by spencgr View Post
OMG, seriously?? So the only two options are assaulting a child or getting baby teeth drilled out? I've never known a parent to be so aggressive with feeding and cleaning, and I've never known a child to have to get their baby teeth drilled out.... .so there is obviously a middle ground here ..
I know, right?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 10:54 AM
 
6,399 posts, read 1,980,544 times
Reputation: 8685
Second opinion is needed.

Dentists say a LOT of things are must haves, and most are maybe haves.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 12:11 PM
 
731 posts, read 213,552 times
Reputation: 1589
Quote:
Originally Posted by spencgr View Post
OMG, seriously?? So the only two options are assaulting a child or getting baby teeth drilled out? I've never known a parent to be so aggressive with feeding and cleaning, and I've never known a child to have to get their baby teeth drilled out.... .so there is obviously a middle ground here ..
Toddlers have their teeth drilled, sometimes the only option is to remove them.


The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that babies give up the bottle entirely by about age 1, and no later than 18 months. Obviously, if the child continues, there will be dental issues.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top