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Old 05-27-2019, 10:40 PM
 
11,115 posts, read 6,782,823 times
Reputation: 9354

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Quote:
Originally Posted by parentingimproved View Post
I am a father of 3 year old. Limiting screen time has been definitely a challenge for me. I am thinking to immerse myself in this topic & find a solution for this problem. I asked some of my friends. They all seem to have the same problem. Would you be interested in advice on the same?
Get the hammer out of your tool box and smash the "screen".
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Old 05-28-2019, 05:01 AM
 
1,605 posts, read 906,660 times
Reputation: 2485
While I do give my son a lit of screen time, I'm usually right there with him. We watch a lot of educational videos. He's 8, knows the entire periodic table of elements by heart, 3-dimensional geometry volume formulas, exponents, operations with mixed fractions. He likes this stuff, I'm gonna let him.

However, if we have to do something that requires powering down, there is ZERO discussion. He will comply, immediately. If you cannot do this with a 3 year old, the problem may lie with you.

Let him cry.
Let him scream.
Let someModerator cut: delete nosy neighbor calModerator cut: deletel social services.

You are the parent and while some states have (stupidly) outlawed active, physical punishment, passive, reward-withholding punishment is still allowed in all states (except possibly for California). Sequesting a toy or electronic device is well within your rights (well, for now at least).

Last edited by Miss Blue; 05-29-2019 at 08:29 AM.. Reason: deleted the inappropriate words
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Old 05-28-2019, 06:05 AM
 
Location: Western North Carolina
5,086 posts, read 8,094,273 times
Reputation: 10945
Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdieBelle View Post

Step 1: Don't use a phone like a pacifier to keep them busy. Let them learn how to busy themselves.
I see this all the time. Kids in strollers holding and looking at cell phones.
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Old 05-28-2019, 07:22 AM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,978 posts, read 9,502,545 times
Reputation: 11771
It's called saying no and turning the screen off. Am I missing something?
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Old 05-31-2019, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Southern New Hampshire
7,525 posts, read 13,238,229 times
Reputation: 23572
Quote:
Originally Posted by NDak15 View Post
It's called saying no and turning the screen off. Am I missing something?
Just a one-and-done poster whose screen name and one and only post made it sound like he was going to try to sell us something ...
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Old 06-05-2019, 02:30 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
10 posts, read 3,325 times
Reputation: 15
For me, the solution is the limitation of the time built in the iOS devices. I'm sure there are the alternatives for Android too.
Just set up 20 min limit per day and that's it. Also, be ready to give your kid some alternative activity or chores.
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Old 10-04-2019, 03:29 AM
 
102 posts, read 343,964 times
Reputation: 39
I would like some guidance on how to approach a bipolar, narcissistic, ill-tempered stay at home dad with the fact that his 2-YO is in front of a TV from the minute he wakes up, for several hours, and other lengthy periods during the day. Often its a two-hour minimum. Meanwhile, dad is in the man cave smoking cigarettes, on the net, and watching television himself. He does work, but I am appalled at all this precious time that should be spent interacted with his own son, he is delegating to the box. I happen to share a house with these two, not a parent myself, but it really devastated me yesterday when I attempted to read to/with the little one after one of the videotapes ran out. I thought how perfect, the show is over, I can jump in and we can look at BOOKS and letters, etc. Dad walks over and restarts another video, completely interrupted what was a perfect moment when the little one was not distracted and could focus on a book and some human interaction.

With limited knowledge, it just seems to me that even the littlest brain can use some quiet time, not inundated with the endless noises, animations, and sound coming from the box. I'm not understanding when the kid is supposed to be able to use his own resources to be able to think and play with maybe no other distraction. Is this much TV and non-interaction from the father something to be concerned about? The father is literate, so I am bothered even more that the TV seems to be the kid's primary influence. The kid seems to really like it when I play with him, and try to use books, coloring, etc. I'm not aware that the father ever even colors with the son.
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Old 10-04-2019, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Texas
44,184 posts, read 54,315,316 times
Reputation: 73009
Quote:
Originally Posted by parentingimproved View Post
I am a father of 3 year old. Limiting screen time has been definitely a challenge for me. I am thinking to immerse myself in this topic & find a solution for this problem. I asked some of my friends. They all seem to have the same problem. Would you be interested in advice on the same?
Don't give them screens.

Have an 8 year old and 5 year old.

They don't have screen time at all during the week and rarely any during the weekend.

They're just not allowed. They seem to be fine with it, though I know they'd LOVE unlimited ipad time. Just like they'd love unlimited ice cream.

Not quite clear why this is a challenge.
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Old 10-04-2019, 08:58 AM
 
4,602 posts, read 3,097,513 times
Reputation: 9158
Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
Don't give them screens.

Have an 8 year old and 5 year old.

They don't have screen time at all during the week and rarely any during the weekend.

They're just not allowed. They seem to be fine with it, though I know they'd LOVE unlimited ipad time. Just like they'd love unlimited ice cream.

Not quite clear why this is a challenge.
Hanging out with my 8 yo and 10 yo grandsons yesterday and talking about a big family vacation coming up. They are hoping to be able to earn some screen time while in the car on the long drive.

I like how my son and DIL limit it, make them earn it and put more importance on everything else.

While playing and reading with children is important, it's also important for them to learn how to amuse themselves alone and without a screen.
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Old 10-04-2019, 10:25 AM
 
16,477 posts, read 18,534,754 times
Reputation: 16350
Quote:
Originally Posted by gottaGetOut View Post
I would like some guidance on how to approach a bipolar, narcissistic, ill-tempered stay at home dad with the fact that his 2-YO is in front of a TV from the minute he wakes up, for several hours, and other lengthy periods during the day. Often its a two-hour minimum. Meanwhile, dad is in the man cave smoking cigarettes, on the net, and watching television himself. He does work, but I am appalled at all this precious time that should be spent interacted with his own son, he is delegating to the box. I happen to share a house with these two, not a parent myself, but it really devastated me yesterday when I attempted to read to/with the little one after one of the videotapes ran out. I thought how perfect, the show is over, I can jump in and we can look at BOOKS and letters, etc. Dad walks over and restarts another video, completely interrupted what was a perfect moment when the little one was not distracted and could focus on a book and some human interaction.

With limited knowledge, it just seems to me that even the littlest brain can use some quiet time, not inundated with the endless noises, animations, and sound coming from the box. I'm not understanding when the kid is supposed to be able to use his own resources to be able to think and play with maybe no other distraction. Is this much TV and non-interaction from the father something to be concerned about? The father is literate, so I am bothered even more that the TV seems to be the kid's primary influence. The kid seems to really like it when I play with him, and try to use books, coloring, etc. I'm not aware that the father ever even colors with the son.
You should start a separate thread for this as you will get more answers there. I would certainly be concerned about the little one since doctors recommend no screen time at all for children this young.

Since you share a house with the dad, can you talk to him and offer some caregiving for the child? What is your relationship to the dad? You say the dad is bipolar. Is he taking meds for that? He may not be able to interact well with his son? Where is the mom in all this?
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