U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-03-2019, 10:56 AM
 
3,932 posts, read 7,516,485 times
Reputation: 4421

Advertisements

Some of the kids I tutor don't know how to count money (coins) and have never bought anything. This has come up with 5th and 6th graders. I haven't asked my older students. I suspect that they also don't have much experience with money, because when I suggest they think of quarters when multiplying or dividing by 25, or rounding to 25 to estimate, nothing "clicks." It's no easier to multiply by 25 than by 23 or 16.



Their parents are always surprised to find out that their kids don't know the difference between a dime and a nickel, or how much a quarter is worth. The schools work on it some in the early grades, but because the kids don't ever use this skill, they forget (if they ever learned it). It just doesn't occur to them that their kids have never bought anything.


Last year I also discovered that my 5th-7th graders didn't know the months of the year, and one didn't know the days of the week.


The kids who come to me for help aren't at the top of the class, but they are of normal intelligence.



Parents, do your kids know these things? Are you sure?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-03-2019, 01:08 PM
 
1,828 posts, read 738,468 times
Reputation: 3009
We started this in middle school. He gets $10/week in allowance and is free to buy what he wants with it. We still pay for his activities, but if he wants a video game, he pays for it himself. It's never too early to start what money means and financial responsibility! You don't want to give your children free money that they will eventually think they can sit and play video games all day and the money will flow in freely. Nope, you run out, you can't buy anything.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2019, 01:10 PM
 
6,464 posts, read 4,063,729 times
Reputation: 16667
I homeschooled my three kids for the early grades, and the curriculum included learning days of the week, months of the year, and counting money in kindergarten. Yes, they bought things at the store with cash at an early age. I'm a little shocked that 5th-7th graders lack any of these skills, but the one that is the least shocking is money, because lots of people only use cards to pay nowadays.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2019, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Winterpeg
880 posts, read 334,774 times
Reputation: 3691
My now-grown kid did when she was little. She got a cash allowance and got cash for birthdays and the like, which we allowed her to use. But times have changed, and my family rarely uses cash now. I could imagine a child growing up never seeing much cash and therefore not becoming experienced with it.

The days of the week and the month thing is different. The kids must not be paying much attention to the world around them! I do know some parents who expect nothing of their kids and organize them to death. They never let the kid to take any responsibility for organizing their own time, so I suppose those kids might end up in that situation by age 10-12.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2019, 02:23 PM
 
9,519 posts, read 13,433,244 times
Reputation: 5692
Many places, specially in NYC I see this, are not even accepting cash anymore. It's card only @ many establishments now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2019, 02:39 PM
 
6,176 posts, read 2,849,330 times
Reputation: 15649
I assure you it came as a surprise when I worked retail and a recent h.s student came to work the register. She had zero ability to add ,subtract,multiply. She had to use a calculator. She knew numbers and coins values . She just had no foundation to comprehend the formula for simple math. So yes ..it happens. You can thank technology for easing folks in doing the so called mundane.

I work nightshift so yeah I can be confused on what day it is.

My grand son is 15 and still can't read a face clock. He reaches for his phone or looks at his ipad clock (digital). He's excelled in his architect engineering class course... go figure that out...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2019, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
372 posts, read 188,105 times
Reputation: 1395
I have a 6th grader (well, for four more days I have one) and he learned about money & months of the year ages ago. And it was revisited many times. I don't think it has to do with his intelligence level, but the education he received. We, as his parents, also reinforced what he learned at school (my husband still on occasion rattles off the song that goes through the number of days in each month). He can and does use money to buy things at baseball games, snack bars, etc. He also keeps track of his allowance total which is based on chores that have various 'values' ranging from a quarter to a couple of dollars.

So if a kid learned about money in, say, second grade, but never did anything with it again, I could see why they wouldn't have a firm grasp on it once they hit middle school age.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2019, 05:35 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
11,157 posts, read 20,437,717 times
Reputation: 26428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nov3 View Post
I assure you it came as a surprise when I worked retail and a recent h.s student came to work the register. She had zero ability to add ,subtract,multiply. She had to use a calculator. She knew numbers and coins values . She just had no foundation to comprehend the formula for simple math. So yes ..it happens. You can thank technology for easing folks in doing the so called mundane.
20 years ago when I was managing a gas station and training cashiers, there were some who couldn't do anything without a calculator. I didn't want a calculator left by the register because it can be used as a tool for stealing, but we had no choice with some of those people. Even showing them how to count up to figure the change didn't work for some (say the total is 16.86, they pay with a 20. You hit the wrong button, it doesn't show you the change, so you start with 16.86, then put four pennies in your hand to get to 16.90, then a dime to get to 17.00, then count up to 18, 19, 20 with dollar bills, and that gives you their change. Almost everyone can make change this way once they comprehend it.)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2019, 07:06 PM
 
3,538 posts, read 1,344,614 times
Reputation: 6920
yes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2019, 08:05 AM
 
6,521 posts, read 2,355,719 times
Reputation: 14982
Seems like I learned money denominations from an early age. I was like 6 or 7 when I started getting a .25 allowance a week,and knowing if I saved my allowance for a month, I'd be able to buy a particular plastic shiny bracelet I had my eye on, in the 5 and dime store. My sisters were always envious that I had the ability to wait to spend my money. They did not. LOL But they were younger so there's that.


It used to be, preschool and kindergarden would go over what day it was, every morning. They'd make a big deal about marking off the last day, and flipping the calendar page when it was time, and they'd also discuss the weather. "Ok class, who can tell me what month and day it is?" And little hands would shoot up. "And let's look out the window...what's the WEATHER like today?" And little hands would shoot up. So...THAT aspect really surprises me...that 5th and 6th graders can't even list the months of the year, or the days of the week. Wow.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top