U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-19-2019, 10:27 PM
 
3,293 posts, read 1,341,904 times
Reputation: 6636

Advertisements

Six, after first grade. I had a family that read to me every night and on the first day of summer vacation after first grade, I decided I might as well read to myself now that I'd been taught how. I "cheated" at first, not being able to sound out everything, but it didn't stop me. Like GreatBlueHeron said, here I am still, reading obsessively. Now I have a smart phone, so anything I don't know (plenty! even after all these years), I can look up immediately and not be ignorant.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-19-2019, 10:54 PM
 
Location: White House, TN
5,580 posts, read 3,924,156 times
Reputation: 3496
15 months. Circa March 1994. It's possible that I was reading even earlier, but didn't voice it. I was laying at my grandfather's feet, reading an early 1980s phone book, and read out the word "Datsun", as in the car brand that had been out of production for several years before I was born. I don't ever remember being unable to read.

As an aside, you would think, with my first read word being "Datsun", living in Tennessee my whole life where Nissan USA is headquartered, and sharing a birthday with Nissan (I was born on Dec. 25 at 6:47 pm in TN, so it was already Dec. 26 in Japan, the same day of the year Nissan was founded), that I would drive a Nissan. Good cars, but I have a 2011 Honda Accord.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2019, 11:42 PM
 
Location: Lexington, Kentucky
6,976 posts, read 3,992,333 times
Reputation: 12978
First grade, is when I remember reading for real...so that was what at about 5 or 6.
That was back in the sixties.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2019, 11:50 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,828 posts, read 18,832,665 times
Reputation: 33723
First grade back in the 1950s. My parents always read to me and that's very important for learning how to read. I was in no rush however, we played outside and did lots of other things so I learned my alphabet in kindergarten and reading in first grade. I absolutely loved reading.
__________________
my posts as moderator will be in red. Moderator: Health&Wellness~Genealogy. The Rules--read here>>> TOS. If someone attacks you, do not reply. Hit REPORT.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2019, 08:28 AM
 
3,542 posts, read 1,350,218 times
Reputation: 6929
i read the "funny papers" to my parents at age 4.
then...they bought some comic books for me
which kept me quiet in the evenings.
i was reading "real books" at 5.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2019, 09:05 AM
 
988 posts, read 715,857 times
Reputation: 3803
Me: Somewhere in 1st grade.
Kids: Preschool.

I don't think timing is important, so long as it doesn't interfere with their ability to keep up with their class.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2019, 09:09 AM
 
602 posts, read 201,677 times
Reputation: 1827
Early 4. My kids were early 4 to late 5.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2019, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Pikeville, Ky.
13,570 posts, read 21,712,120 times
Reputation: 18110
It has been so many years ago I can't remember. I was raised in the 40's and 50's, so no TV, no internet, no big expensive vacations or birthday parties. We had books, newspapers, magazines, the Sunday funnies from the big thick Sunday newspaper, and the battery operated radio, for our enjoyment, and our touch with the world outside our little circle of family and friends.

My parents always read in their leisure time in the evenings, while I sat on the floor holding a book upside down and made up a story I was "reading".

Ever since I can remember, I couldn't wait to learn to read for myself, even though our mom read to us a couple times a day.

Anyway when I started school I began to read and haven't been long without a book (now my Kindle) in my hand or nearby as I stir supper on the stove. My children and grand children all learned around 6. Sadly, none of them are "readers" except for the SM sites on their phones.
__________________
Moderator of:
Non Romantic Relationships
Parenting and sub forums
Dayton, Akron-Canton in Ohio
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2019, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
4,634 posts, read 3,696,178 times
Reputation: 8613
Four or five, around 1952. I picked up a newspaper and started commenting to my mother about the national budget and she nearly had a heart attack - no one had any idea I knew how to read. I entered first grade with an eighth-grade reading level (talk about boredom during class). A year or two later, I was at a twelfth-grade level. My parents got the public library to issue me an adult library card somehow and told them to let me check out whatever I wanted.

How did I learn to read? Few went to kindergarten in those days (at least in our working-class neighborhood), and as far as I know there was nothing like preschool. My immigrant grandfather read the comics to me every night in the paper, and he'd follow along with his finger as he read the dialog. My mother and grandmother would also read me stories. This was before we got our first TV and entertainment at home consisted of reading, listening to shows on the radio, and playing games. I'm 72 now, and always have two or three books I'm reading scattered around the house. Today, there's one on my bedside, one in the living room, and another in my briefcase.

So if you want your kids to become lifelong readers - read to them often, explain things to them, limit the amount of time spent on electronic entertainment, and help them find books they are truly passionate about, rather than books you or their teachers think are "important" for them to read. Unless it's fun, they're not going to stick with it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2019, 10:52 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,554 posts, read 70,455,727 times
Reputation: 76527
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vasily View Post
Four or five, around 1952. I picked up a newspaper and started commenting to my mother about the national budget and she nearly had a heart attack - no one had any idea I knew how to read. I entered first grade with an eighth-grade reading level (talk about boredom during class). A year or two later, I was at a twelfth-grade level. My parents got the public library to issue me an adult library card somehow and told them to let me check out whatever I wanted.

How did I learn to read? Few went to kindergarten in those days (at least in our working-class neighborhood), and as far as I know there was nothing like preschool. My immigrant grandfather read the comics to me every night in the paper, and he'd follow along with his finger as he read the dialog. My mother and grandmother would also read me stories. This was before we got our first TV and entertainment at home consisted of reading, listening to shows on the radio, and playing games. I'm 72 now, and always have two or three books I'm reading scattered around the house. Today, there's one on my bedside, one in the living room, and another in my briefcase.

So if you want your kids to become lifelong readers - read to them often, explain things to them, limit the amount of time spent on electronic entertainment, and help them find books they are truly passionate about, rather than books you or their teachers think are "important" for them to read. Unless it's fun, they're not going to stick with it.
Cute. Very cute. So, how did you do in college and career? Just curious, since you really got of to such a head start.

And how on earth did your grade school, to say nothing of Jr. High & high school, accommodate your advanced reading level, or did they not try? Were your writing skills similarly advanced? I'm thinking you should have been given research projects to do and report on, like elementary term papers, by 3rd or 4th grade.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top