U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-20-2019, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Middle of the Pacific Ocean
11,708 posts, read 6,293,874 times
Reputation: 11544

Advertisements

Not sure exactly, but it was early for me. We were all home schooled and my mother got us started very early.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-20-2019, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Austin
12,232 posts, read 6,953,257 times
Reputation: 13485
I can't remember reading until 2nd grade.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2019, 07:05 PM
 
147 posts, read 26,390 times
Reputation: 118
Default re

Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I completely agree. Just like you can't tell who started walking at 9 months and who was 16 months before they took a step, by the time they are in school. Or who had 12 teeth and who had none on their first birthday. Or whether they were potty trained at 18 months or not until 3 1/2. Unless a child is way ahead of or way behind the normal curve, all those milestones are pretty meaningless.
why are they even taken into consideration then? I mean let's face it most parents panic when their kid talks, walks, or potty trains late.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2019, 07:13 PM
 
6,504 posts, read 4,082,513 times
Reputation: 16818
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bridge781 View Post
why are they even taken into consideration then? I mean let's face it most parents panic when their kid talks, walks, or potty trains late.
Of course they do, but hopefully they have other more experienced parents or at least a pediatrician to talk them down. There is a range of normal, and hardly anyone is early on everything. If your baby is 20 months old and not walking you should definitely get it checked out, but if they are 12 months and still crawling around you don't need to rush them to physical therapy just because your friend's baby walked at 9 months or you read in a book that 12 months is the "average" age for first steps.

Age 6 or 7 is VERY normal to start reading. It only becomes a problem when schools push the idea that all kindergarteners need to be reading on such and such a level by the end of the year. That kind of thing makes parents panic needlessly and puts so much pressure on little kids who are not quite ready and really should be allowed just to be little kids, a little bit longer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2019, 05:45 AM
 
325 posts, read 395,363 times
Reputation: 671
I was 3 or early 4 years old when I started reading well. I remember that by 1st grade, I was squirreling away breakfast/lunch money that I got from grandma to buy newspaper and magazines to read after school.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2019, 05:56 AM
 
Location: Southwest
47 posts, read 9,205 times
Reputation: 83
age 3
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2019, 06:31 AM
 
Location: Northern Maine
9,777 posts, read 14,955,516 times
Reputation: 9588
My mother taught me to read when I was four. When I was in second grade we got three orphan Armenian children in our class that were about seven years old. The teacher told me to teach an Armenian girl the alphabet and the sounds of the letters. By the end of the year she could read at grade level. Her parents had been crucified by the Turks. There is an Armenian Orthodox church in Maine. They share a church building with the Greek Orthodox and Syrian Orthodox congregations.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2019, 06:56 AM
 
427 posts, read 284,722 times
Reputation: 1007
I find it rather humorous that nearly all of the responses thus far skew heavily on the earlier reading side. Statistically, it isn't representative of the mean at all. Perhaps the people who started reading later feel embarrassed to post. I think I've said this in another post, but I know a reading specialist that argues you shouldn't teach kids how to read (unless they are intrinsically motivated to learn) until the middle to end of second grade. I was an early reader (3), but my husband was a later one (7.5). Both of us went on to achieve multiple graduate degrees and he is arguably a more avid reader than I am. People put too much emphasis on how early kids do things these days. It's always a competition to see who reads first, who walks first, who grew tall fastest, or who could throw/catch a ball first when all of these things tend to come out in the wash at the end.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2019, 07:21 AM
 
2,103 posts, read 717,805 times
Reputation: 5382
I was 4. It was the 1950s and when she registered me for first grade and told them I could read they said that was impossible at my age- I'd just memorized the books she read to me. Mom had only a HS education but she knew better.

I can't remember when DS started reading- probably not that early but certainly by kindergarten. My oldest granddaughter turned 5 in April, home-schooled and her skills are pretty elementary but she's reading simple words and she's smart and curious. She'll get there. IMO, for some kids reading is a tool and they don't get really interested in reading till they need it to learn about things. DS wasn't a prolific reader as a kid but now he reads a LOT for information.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2019, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Winterpeg
882 posts, read 336,610 times
Reputation: 3706
I started before kindergarten. I remember being on a family road trip and reading a sign out loud. My mom turned around looked at me like I had two heads. I was surprised at her surprise, because I'd been reading them in my head for a while.

My twin brother, OTOH, was "normal" as my mom later told me. In the early 70s that meant in grade 1, so 6 or turning 7. For the record - I'm an underachieving avid reader who never finished university. My brother got a university degree, is the CEO of a small tech company, and once bragged to me that he's never read a book that wasn't assigned for a course.


I hadn't paid much attention to my daughter's progression in kindergarten other than the teacher told me she was doing fine. Her dad is an avid reader, too, and we knew our kid was smart enough, so we didn't worry about it. But then one day I went for pick up time and she was sitting with a small circle of kids around her and she was reading them a book. And that's how I learned she could read.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top