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Old 07-09-2019, 10:01 AM
 
9,595 posts, read 5,804,602 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by somebodynew View Post
Many years ago I was a child care provider. I had a lot of interaction with the early childhood educators at the local school as I had some disadvantage little ones in my care. ALL of them focused on the social/emotional skills (rightly) at this age. Three weeks away would have been problematic for some, depending on their home life, but not most.
I agree. Itís not black and white. Some kids benefit more then others from early education and would have negative impacts from a three week absence. Others wouldnít miss a beat. Totally depends on multiple factors including home life (a huge factor), intelligence, opportunities outside of school, etc.
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Old 07-09-2019, 11:51 AM
 
Location: WI
2,891 posts, read 3,216,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
You are completely misinterpreting what I said. Why do we have schooling, if it's that unimportant? (Homeschooling or otherwise)
So if it's not a big deal to miss one of 36ish weeks of school, then school has no value at all? I'm not following. This is very strange logic.
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Old 07-09-2019, 02:12 PM
 
5,618 posts, read 3,666,516 times
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Growing up I'd take whole years off.

Go back and they're teaching the same stuff.

A week of school here or there isn't going to matter.
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Old 07-09-2019, 03:14 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,008 posts, read 102,606,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PamelaIamela View Post
Most kids my age never went to kindergarten!
It's important now because it is DAYCARE which supports the two income family.
This thread is not supposed to be about early childhood education. Many people on this thread have said school attendance isn't important in elementary school. One even said it would be OK to miss two weeks in a row for travel. I said if attendance isn't important, why the big emphasis on ECE? Then it was hijacked from there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by strawflower View Post
So if it's not a big deal to miss one of 36ish weeks of school, then school has no value at all? I'm not following. This is very strange logic.
The metric for "excessive absence" is 10% of school days, about 18 days. If you take 5 for a vacation, that leaves 13 for illnesses and other unavoidable absences. Secondly, five in a row is quite different from five scattered days.
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Old 07-09-2019, 03:15 PM
 
6,207 posts, read 2,868,513 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LordSquidworth View Post
Growing up I'd take whole years off.

Go back and they're teaching the same stuff.

A week of school here or there isn't going to matter.
Show up,;you may learn something.

You missing school is evident.

Your life experiences may well have kept you alive. Educated though. Unlikely.

I concede that applying information thru repeated habits is par in early learning. Even bad habits are done that way..
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Old 07-09-2019, 03:43 PM
 
9,595 posts, read 5,804,602 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
This thread is not supposed to be about early childhood education. Many people on this thread have said school attendance isn't important in elementary school. One even said it would be OK to miss two weeks in a row for travel. I said if attendance isn't important, why the big emphasis on ECE? Then it was hijacked from there.



The metric for "excessive absence" is 10% of school days, about 18 days. If you take 5 for a vacation, that leaves 13 for illnesses and other unavoidable absences. Secondly, five in a row is quite different from five scattered days.
The opís son is 4 and she mentions that they plan to travel a lot in the next few years, hence the emphasis on early childhood/elementary.
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Old 07-09-2019, 05:12 PM
 
5,618 posts, read 3,666,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nov3 View Post
Show up,;you may learn something.

You missing school is evident.

Your life experiences may well have kept you alive. Educated though. Unlikely.

I concede that applying information thru repeated habits is par in early learning. Even bad habits are done that way..
At least I know the difference between spade and spay.

Derka durr.
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Old 07-09-2019, 05:45 PM
 
56 posts, read 16,096 times
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If you travel that frequently, what happens if a child is sick and needs a few days off? You are at danger for reaching the maximum quickly or risk the child failing a grade. Without some kind of rigid itinerary the educational argument is weak, too. You aren't taking the child on vacation to travel to educate him, you are doing it because you love to travel and you are selfishly considering your needs above the child's, or you could just travel during scheduled off times.

It pulls the child out of his routine, away from his friends, and puts him behind his peers. There are plenty of off days from school for it. Many schools will not consider it an "excused" absence.
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Old 07-09-2019, 08:10 PM
 
16,100 posts, read 17,899,425 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PamelaIamela View Post
Most kids my age never went to kindergarten!
It's important now because it is DAYCARE which supports the two income family.
The first kindergartens in the US opened in 1837. Free Kindergarten was only in a few places until 1877. From 1873 to 1886, the number of kindergarten children in this country steadily increased from a handful of one thousand to twenty thousand. By 1880, there were more than 400 kindergartens in 30 states and kindergarten teacher training schools in every major U.S. city. Nearly all states began to fund kindergarten by the 1970s. Between 1966 and 1975, many states began to fund kindergartens.

Despite your disparagement, kindergarten is NOT daycare although it does care for the children of working parents. It is actually too short to be their daycare which is why many after school programs exist. The kindergarten curriculum today involves much more than social skills although that is also important. Children now learn the basics of reading and math and writing in kindergarten today.
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Old 07-10-2019, 02:47 AM
 
Location: Plainfield NJ
324 posts, read 114,533 times
Reputation: 1281
Quote:
Originally Posted by kineki View Post
If you travel that frequently, what happens if a child is sick and needs a few days off? You are at danger for reaching the maximum quickly or risk the child failing a grade. Without some kind of rigid itinerary the educational argument is weak, too. You aren't taking the child on vacation to travel to educate him, you are doing it because you love to travel and you are selfishly considering your needs above the child's, or you could just travel during scheduled off times.

It pulls the child out of his routine, away from his friends, and puts him behind his peers. There are plenty of off days from school for it. Many schools will not consider it an "excused" absence.
I'm not talking about taking 2 weeks off. Im talking about a few days here and there. And unless my child has a chronic illness, both illness and unexcused absences shouldnt be more than 10 days total. Also, visiting a place that is educational such as national parks, zoo's, aquariums, national monuments, historical sites, all have educational value in the visit without rigid learning. Children learn through interaction.
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