U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-24-2019, 05:10 AM
 
Location: Plainfield NJ
423 posts, read 148,630 times
Reputation: 1568

Advertisements

I also dont think kids should pay their cell phone until they move out. i paid for my own when i was a teen. But it was a luxury then, its practically a necessity now. I dont have a house phone to tell him to use to call his friends. there are no pay phones. so i consider it a parenting expense. Extra data i would maybe charge for, but we have unlimited.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-24-2019, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Over yonder a piece
3,934 posts, read 4,717,888 times
Reputation: 6299
Quote:
Originally Posted by LO28SWM View Post
I also dont think kids should pay their cell phone until they move out. i paid for my own when i was a teen. But it was a luxury then, its practically a necessity now. I dont have a house phone to tell him to use to call his friends. there are no pay phones. so i consider it a parenting expense. Extra data i would maybe charge for, but we have unlimited.
I have told my kids that I'll pay for their phone through college, but at that point we can stay on a family plan to keep the discount but they'll need to pay me their monthly portion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2019, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Wherever life takes me.
6,142 posts, read 6,740,129 times
Reputation: 3164
Quote:
Originally Posted by celticseas View Post
I assume that most young adults/teens have part time jobs these days. I wonder what they spend their money on. Do you prohibit certain things like alcohol, weed, drugs or are you permissive of them. Do they pay rent?
I got a job at 14 and I spent my money on clothes, the movies, going to go things with my friends, make up etc.
As I got older I started paying for more and more like my cell phone, car insurance etc.

Iíve had a bank account with a debit card since I was 14.

And no my mom had no idea when I spent $20 here and there on weed or alcohol for that matter. I wasnít an idiot I didnít ask permission to break her rules. 😂😂😂

Once I turned 18 I kicked my mom off my bank account and have been the sole person on my bank account since. So once I turned 18 she couldnít see how I was spending my money anymore. 🤷🏼*♀️🤷🏼*♀️
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2019, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
9,801 posts, read 10,642,060 times
Reputation: 13727
Quote:
Originally Posted by celticseas View Post
What were "entertainment expenses"?
Same as they are today, but a little more age and income appropriate.

Movies, carnival, local pool hall, taking a girlfriend out to eat, etc. My buddies and I would go to the local sub place on the beach, get a sub and hangout on the beach wall and talk for a few hours. This was late 90's timeframe.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2019, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
26,767 posts, read 63,612,759 times
Reputation: 31105
Daughter 24, working. Pays minimal rent ($200) and pays for her cell phone ($65), buys her groceries, car insurance, car repairs, gas, registration, pet food, pet toys, some computer games some costumey stuff for her dress up parties, more pet toys, gas and more gas, occasional dinners or lunches out, occasional trip - camping or just visiting friends, buying stuff for her broke brother in Texas. Pets are probably her main expense. She has two cats, a huge snake and a Parrolet and maybe some fish if the cats did not eat them again.

Son 19 In college, works part time in the summer and weekends during school- computer parts (upgrades), computer games, eating out with friends, car repair, gas, saving for college, food, laundry, rent, musical instruments. He mostly subsides on scholarship money. We give him $100 a month. He earns the rest. We may chip in extra if there is a special expense like getting his wisdom teeth cut out.

Son in Texas 23. Food, rent, student loans, computer, bicycle payments.

Other two daughters are 27 plus. They spend it on normal adult stuff mortgage, student loans, car payments, food etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2019, 07:24 AM
 
1 posts, read 164 times
Reputation: 10
I don't have kids but those kids that I know want to work in animation industry (at least they think so right now and they believe it is a perspective area), so they spend time and a bit of pocket money in CLILK animation editor or they create cartoons right in the browser, this thing is my recent discovery and I love it. Anyway, I think that teens just try to find a creative activity that they like to do, so it doesn't cost really much money.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2019, 10:02 AM
 
Location: USA
332 posts, read 101,166 times
Reputation: 1483
When the boys were teens, it was the usual suspects: clothes, movies, car stuff, women, and alcohol.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2019, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Southern California
24,840 posts, read 8,731,506 times
Reputation: 16168
Today as I see a lot of it high priced tech stuff, pricey starbucks coffees and pricey juice/veggie blended drinks and all the other usual stuff but the 3 added which I never encountered growing up.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2019, 03:14 PM
 
6,038 posts, read 13,214,394 times
Reputation: 6922
Quote:
Originally Posted by ccc123 View Post
No my husband and I buy their drugs and alcohol, why should they have to spend their own money on the necessities? I hand it out on Monday mornings along with their lunch money for the week.
Thanks for the giggle today.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2019, 03:27 PM
 
6,038 posts, read 13,214,394 times
Reputation: 6922
We have a teenage son who is living at home while he attends college. He spends most of his money on treating his girlfriend to eating out and buying her shoes and shopping and things. He also helps us out with paying for his college tuition that grants and scholarships don't cover. But we pay for everything else. We don't want him to stress about money as long as he is living at home and pursuing his education. He's also a very practical kid and doesn't seem to ask for that much or need that much, so he is easy. So we pay for his car, insurance, cell phone, etc. He works but we want him to use his money to enjoy being young - while he can! So he blows most of it on his girlfriend, it seems like. Our older son spent most of his money on cars and clothes when he lived at home. He liked the more expensive things that we were not willing to buy for him (istuff and other trendy expensive items), so he got a job so that he could buy those things for himself. Now he's married with a kiddo and so all his money goes to them. And he can't afford istuff anymore, so he's team Android like the rest of us bums. lol
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top