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Old 08-30-2019, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Continental Europe
914 posts, read 182,664 times
Reputation: 1464

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdieBelle View Post
You (and Mary) are showing a real lack of understanding of blackface as a cultural phenomenon. It was FAR more prevalent in mainstream society for decades than drag is. This is derailing this thread.

It's your choice not to take your (hypothetical) kids. I would make the same choice. It doesn't make blackface relevant here.
I'll let Mary know she's got it wrong

I don't agree it derails the thread because it is one reason I wouldn't take my hypothetical kids to see a drag queen.
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Old 08-30-2019, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Continental Europe
914 posts, read 182,664 times
Reputation: 1464
Quote:
Originally Posted by Transmition View Post
So first you said it was unacceptable (via quote) because it was mockery of women, now you are saying it is okay as long as it is among adults because you think it is something sexual? It's neither of those, it's an artform from when non-straight men could not express themselves openly without getting locked up.


It's essentially performance art, people dressing up and acting. It's a lot better than someone dressing as a giant mouse and feeding them bad pizza to entertain kids.
Have you looked at the research about autogynephilia? It is an artform motivated by a sexual fetish. Many cross dressers admit this.
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Old 08-30-2019, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Continental Europe
914 posts, read 182,664 times
Reputation: 1464
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
I think the analogy rings hollow. If men who cross dressed had kept women as slaves historically, THEN it would be offensive.
Women have been oppressed by men throughout history and continue to be in many areas of the world. Perhaps not kept as slaves by name but had to defer to their male kin for permission for many things, could legally be raped and beaten by their menfolk throughout history. Legally speaking, they were considered chattel.

That is why I do not think the analogy rings so hollow.

Last edited by Carly1983; 08-30-2019 at 01:15 PM..
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Old 08-30-2019, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
32,455 posts, read 20,437,312 times
Reputation: 46772
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carly1983 View Post
Women have been oppressed by men throughout history and continue to be in many areas of the world. Perhaps not kept as slaves but had to defer to their male kin for permission for many things and also could legally be raped and beaten by their menfolk throughout history.

That is why I do not think the analogy rings hollow.

Difference of opinion.


Bottom line? Take your kids if you like, and if you don't, don't.
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Old 08-30-2019, 01:15 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
23,039 posts, read 29,342,249 times
Reputation: 44953
I don't care one way or the other. Parents who disapprove can do some other activity with their child for that hour of the year.


Parents who do take their children, it is the parent's responsibility to help their child process it in a reasonable manner so that the child is not emotionally damaged.


I don't think that exposure to drag queens will turn a child gay any more than exposure to a mime turns a child mute, or exposure to a paraplegic will put a child into a wheel chair. It is simply not contagious.


I probably would not take my child. My decision. You may take your child. Your decision.
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Old 08-30-2019, 01:51 PM
 
10,550 posts, read 8,555,233 times
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(Straight) storyteller here.

There is a storytelling theory which says emphasis should be on the story - the storyteller is simply the medium through which the story gains life. This theory holds that the stories told should be strong enough to stand on their own, with appropriate but low-key use of voice changes for different characters, occasional gestures, changes of tone and note, etc., but that the storyteller should remain secondary to the story.

There is a countering storytelling theory which claims that the storyteller should be extremely dramatic, should act out the story flamboyantly, and that the emphasis should be on the storyteller, not the story, in order to hold the attention of the listeners/audience.

Sounds as if drag queen storytellers are adherents to the second theory.

I tend to go for the first theory with my own storytelling.

That's not to say that drag queen storytellers may not have a place in the extremely wide world of storytelling (storytelling has enjoyed a great increase in popularity over the last few decades and storytelling festivals can be found just about everywhere) - it just appears that what they do is more performance art than traditional storytelling, with the storyteller being the link between the story and the listeners.

I also wonder if the current flock of drag queen would-be storytellers in public libraries are provided with some advance training in storytelling techniques, are knowledgeable about children and child development since they seem to be offering their services in library children's rooms, if they practice their chosen stories ahead of time, and so on. It seems to me that the typical drag queen flamboyance would work against trying to tell or read a story to a small child - it would be very hard to keep their attention on the story and to minimize off-topic questions, even if the child-audience is told ahead of time that there will be a question and answer time (to start with or after the storytelling is concluded).

Drag queens and traditional preschool storytime seem like a very odd match to me. Perhaps "Meet a real Drag Queen!" program for teens and adults would be a better use of resources.
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Old 08-30-2019, 01:57 PM
 
445 posts, read 184,181 times
Reputation: 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
I cannot imagine that little kids attach any more meaning to these costumed people than they do to people dressed as clowns, animals or imaginary creatures.
Ok but the ad says it’s to celebrate diversity and self expression. If that is the essential goal yet kids can’t attach any meaning to it, then what is the point of having these events?
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Old 08-30-2019, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
4,270 posts, read 983,859 times
Reputation: 3825
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adriank7 View Post
Ok but the ad says itís to celebrate diversity and self expression. If that is the essential goal yet kids canít attach any meaning to it, then what is the point of having these events?
Drag Queens are entertainers like singers and actors. Most of the time thereís a difference between Transgendered people and a man who enjoys wearing womenís clothing. I have no problem with either one, my point is why do need to support diversity for people that entertain others? Kids are smart enough to figure this out at some point.
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Old 08-30-2019, 03:06 PM
 
295 posts, read 102,080 times
Reputation: 210
Welll I find it funny, and kids will think it is funny as well. Just like if a clown was there.
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Old 08-30-2019, 06:05 PM
 
1,019 posts, read 235,284 times
Reputation: 3633
Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdieBelle View Post
Because the difference here is that blackface was traditionally performed by whites in a position of power.

Sure, drag is not always flattering to women, but it's performed by a traditionally disenfranchised group that is still subject to suppression. Dressing in drag isn't an act of privilege.
Bingo!

I'm reminded of people who try and equate black pride - a movement of defensive solitary meant to protect against racial domination - with white pride - a manifestly supremacist movement meant to marginalize and oppress.

But, hey, I guess women need to be protected from those who have long victimized them: men who wear dresses and eye-liner...
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