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Old 09-17-2019, 11:38 AM
 
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan
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I was at the fairgrounds last week and I kept noticing this little girl pulling a fairly large size doll around in a wheel chair. She looked like she was about 10-12 years old, and it kind of struck me as odd that a girl that old would still be that much into taking dolls with her.
I'm not starting this to be some great debate, just curious as to when this usually phases out did you as parents kind of gently discourage it after awhile?
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Old 09-17-2019, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
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IMHO, it was possible that either the girl had special needs and/or the girl used the doll as a security or comfort item. Or, the family was on vacation and the girl was uncomfortable in a strange environment.

It is also possible that the girl appeared to be that age but was actually much younger. As a child my son was always at the 99th percentile for height & weight and combined with his large vocabulary many people assumed that he was a couple of years older than his actual age. (Funny story, he was, I believe, the only freshman at his HS who wore a full beard and mustache. Of course, people continued to think that he was older.)

Frankly, I would rather see a 10 to 12 year old girl still play with dolls then become "boy crazy" and wear sexy, provocative clothes (like some tweens).
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Old 09-17-2019, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
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If she was in a wheelchair, it's possible that she could be developmentally delayed. However, I don't know if it's appropriate for people to go around saying what we should or should be doing or interested in at a certain age. It is all based on culture and peer pressure usually. If a 12 year old boy still likes Barney and Sesame Street, what difference does it really make?
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Old 09-17-2019, 01:33 PM
 
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I think that pushing children to give up habits or comfort items in order to conform to our percieved societal norms is usually counterproductive and pointless. It's usually due to the parent's own insecurities about how they are percieved by other adults, rather than what is best for their child.

In this case, I would say that she doesn't need to give up her doll until she choses to do so. If she's neurotypical, I would expect peer pressure will lead her to make that choice in a few years, when it becomes "uncool" enough. Taking it to the extreme: she might never give it up, but rather simply relegate the habit to appropriate venues (not bring it to interviews/work) like at home or in private.

We gently push our kids to quit destructive or unhealthy habits (like nail-biting or hair-chewing). We forbid them from rude or offensive habits (like interrupting or whining). Everything else is up to them and the image they want to project (if and when they decide to care about such things).
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Old 09-17-2019, 05:52 PM
 
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American Girl dolls are recommended for ages 8 and up. I'd be thrilled to know any child I bought one for still liked playing with it for few years, since they are $100+. And I realize you didn't say what kind of doll it was, but AG does have a doll that comes with a wheel chair as part of their inclusion policy.
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Old 09-18-2019, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattie View Post
American Girl dolls are recommended for ages 8 and up. I'd be thrilled to know any child I bought one for still liked playing with it for few years, since they are $100+. And I realize you didn't say what kind of doll it was, but AG does have a doll that comes with a wheel chair as part of their inclusion policy.
Excellent points. My daughter loved the historic books, real life accessories & clothing styles of her American Girl doll, and played with it for many years. She also enjoyed the historical crafts, activities and plays and would read other books about the various time periods, and ethnic groups, represented by various historical AG dolls.
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Old Yesterday, 11:01 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nathan777 View Post
If she was in a wheelchair, it's possible that she could be developmentally delayed. However, I don't know if it's appropriate for people to go around saying what we should or should be doing or interested in at a certain age. It is all based on culture and peer pressure usually. If a 12 year old boy still likes Barney and Sesame Street, what difference does it really make?
I got the impression the doll was in a wheelchair not the girl. American Girl makes dolls in wheelchairs, with walkers etc etc as others have mentioned.
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Old Yesterday, 11:24 AM
 
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But … my other stepson is 10 and he still carries around stuffed animals. Granted, they aren't 'dolls' but still, he does. I don't think there's anything wrong with it.


They will grow out of it @ some point.


For some kids, it's a security/comfort thing.
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Old Yesterday, 11:25 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by germaine2626 View Post
Excellent points. My daughter loved the historic books, real life accessories & clothing styles of her American Girl doll, and played with it for many years. She also enjoyed the historical crafts, activities and plays and would read other books about the various time periods, and ethnic groups, represented by various historical AG dolls.
I loved AG!


It was a great history lesson as well as taught a lot about female empowerment.
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Old Yesterday, 12:39 PM
 
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As long as they like. Youngest DD carried around at least two of her identical Beddy Bye Bears everywhere she went until she was a preteen (she had six or seven). They were duplicates of her treasured original that was very worn, the one her grandparents (DH's parents) threw away in a dumpster when she was three. They were babysitting and took it away from her when she was napping in the car. They didn't approve of children being so attached to stuffed animals. Her other grandmother (my mother) was livid that they did this, so when she saw them at a tent sale for $5 each, she bought them all. So DD didn't carry around just ONE, she carried an armload.

Childhood is short, and getting shorter every generation.
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