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Old 09-23-2019, 08:25 AM
 
1,684 posts, read 371,306 times
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My mother used to read to us all the time before we started school.
She had 2 fairy tale books and would read us stories from them.

I didn't learn to read until 1st grade (no kindergarten back in the 60's) but already had a love of books.

Once we started reading my mother let us take turns reading the fairy tale stories and helped us with the words we didn't know.

Those times are vivid memories not only for me but for my brothers and sisters as well.
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Old 09-23-2019, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
57,617 posts, read 55,811,936 times
Reputation: 68683
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
I've been waiting for someone to talk about learning the rhythm of speech. Ever hear the reader who reads. one. word. at. a. time in a monotone? You can hardly understand what he's saying. Do you even care?

As Nov3 said, it's important to teach a child how colorful and interesting our language can sound. It will make him a better public speaker and conversant.

I started talking to my children from day one and also reading to them. My daughter was speaking in simple whole sentences by the time she was one. (Throwing in a forgivable brag, there.) The other one scarcely has said a word since then with a mom and sis who never shut up, poor guy.

No children now but I talk to new kittens and it's amazing how large an understanding vocabulary the cat will have if you are regular in using consistent speech with them.
OMG, yes. I know a woman who reads that way. There is no cadence when she reads. She does not seem to even be aware of the meaning of what she is reading. I think she must have some kind of learning disability that was never addressed (she is in her mid-50s).

She just looks at words and says what she thinks they are, sometimes with amusing results. We were in a theological study group together, and each week one person had to open and close with a thoughtful passage, or a prayer, or a song to share, or a poem.

So one day it was her turn, and she read a prayer written by Bishop Desmond Tutu of South Africa. She droned on in her familiar monotonal reading style, and when she got to the end, she said, "...and guide us as we continue in our Caribbean lives."

I wanted to snatch her kindle out of her hand and say, WTH did you just read? Does not a bell go off in your head that this doesn't make a lick of sense? To this day I have no idea what the word was that she decided was "Caribbean". LOL.
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Old 09-23-2019, 11:14 AM
 
6,538 posts, read 3,727,600 times
Reputation: 22948
Quote:
Originally Posted by STL74 View Post
Reading on their own? No. Not remotely important. No long term benefit really. I suppose their is a short term benefit if itís natural. It could be detrimental if forced. Being read to? Absolutely important.

I read young, my kids read young. It means nothing really except that we were ready when we were ready. I was bright/gifted. My kids are bright. So are plenty of their peers who read later. No long lasting benefit.
The long-lasting benefit for me was discovering early that I had a safe space, a haven to which I could retreat when the world was too much with me. I've observed many children who seem to use their reading time as a coping mechanism for stress.

I think that's a benefit as long as a parent monitors reading time and doesn't allow it to become the solitary favorite activity. It can be a real plus for introverts and an alternative for acting out frustration.
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Old 09-23-2019, 01:00 PM
 
349 posts, read 67,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADAM Ebraham View Post
This is really cool
But can 6-year-olds really read books like Narnia?
Sure yes. But they will get only first (direct) layer/meaning. They would not get the underlying basis of it (unless they grow up in a deeply Christian family - if we talk about Narnia). It takes some more life experience to understand double-speak - certainly not at age of 6, when everything is taken at a face value.
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Old 09-23-2019, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Washington state
5,583 posts, read 2,882,418 times
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You wonder if reading is useful for kids under 5? Are you a parent? Because there's only one answer for that question if you have to read The Pokey Little Puppy to your kid five times a day every day of the week for months on end. Most parents I know are deliriously happy if their kids are reading by themselves at 4 and 5.
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Old 09-23-2019, 03:51 PM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
3,006 posts, read 1,155,141 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post

I started talking to my children from day one and also reading to them. My daughter was speaking in simple whole sentences by the time she was one. (Throwing in a forgivable brag, there.) The other one scarcely has said a word since then with a mom and sis who never shut up, poor guy.

.

Our elder son was quite precocious in speech & vocabulary. We never used "baby talk" but were constantly talking to him from his first days on.


It was a different story with Honorable #2 Son. He seemed to be healthy in all respects but never vocalized. After the obligatory consults with specialists, etc, we just had to get used to fact that he was mute....But then one cold winter morning when he was about 5, the wife made Farina for breakfast and set it out in bowls before us on the table....The kid took one spoonful, puckered up his mouth, furled his brow and spat it back into the bowl. He shoved the bowl across the table and growled defiantly "I'm NOT eating this stuff! It's got LUMPS in it!"...We were all amazed and dumbfounded. Finally his mother exclaimed. "You can talk!"..."Of course I can," he answered. "Then why haven't you said anything before this?"..."Because up until now, everything has been OK."


It's important to develop language skills including the concepts of reading and writing early to set up the proper nerve pathways....And you can teach a very young kid to read like Hans the Wunder Horse as a circus trick, but is a 4 y/o gunna read Huckleberry Finn and discuss it in depth as to its social commentary and observations on human nature?


Let kids be kids.
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Old 09-23-2019, 06:11 PM
 
5,427 posts, read 7,367,256 times
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Being read to and learning to read at that age helped me for my entire educational career - I started out ahead and having those skills and confidence helped me to stay there, big time. The time my mom spent reading to me and teaching me to read I think is one of the very best things she ever did for me in my entire life.
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Old 09-23-2019, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
22,061 posts, read 14,783,923 times
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My grandmother taught me to read at age 3, and the skill sure helped me out a lot over my lifetime.

She was a retired school teacher, and she loved to read aloud to little kids while sitting next to them. Grandma used a finger to track the line in the book as she read it, which allowed me to see the shapes the groups of letters make to form words. She read fairly slowly, and would stop and answer any questions I had about a word's meaning.

I think that was the way I was able to learn reading so young. She would read anything to me; a newspaper, a comic book, captions in photographic magazines like Life, an illustrated Bible, or whatever I dug up. She always had a lot of different books on hand, all over the house, but only a few were children's books. I read them too; my parents bought them for us kids.

I just wish grandma had been better at math! She wasn't much help on that subject past the basics.
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Old 09-23-2019, 07:33 PM
 
Location: West coast
266 posts, read 97,252 times
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Being read to is one of the one of the best things one can do for a child.

My wife and I however were not read to as children and yet we have done very well, going on
38 years of a great marriage.

My situation was my Father died when I was just a couple months old.
Moms was the maker of money and wealth.
We are from Eastern Europe and didnít speak English until I was about 10 years old.
Her (3) future husbands made quite a bit less than her.
Yup Iím a latch key kid.

The wife family did well but my father in law traveled around the globe buying land for the oil companies and his wife I guess was busy 🤔.

The wife and I always read to our kids every night.
Heck we even talked to them while they were in her belly.
I mean full ass talking to a kid in the womb.

Fast forward when the kids were born I did my damnest to read to my 2 little pukes as often as possible.
That means every day.
The wife did more than I because I worked much longer hours.
When I was to tired to read to them I would tell them stories until they fell asleep.

I seriously think they liked the story time from me better than reading.
I would start reading to them, then put the book down and start making up new endings and such.
They would actually say ďno we want to hear the ending that has this to itĒ.

Awe I miss being a Daddy to young ones.
Andy.
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Old 09-23-2019, 08:38 PM
 
Location: New York Area
16,612 posts, read 6,585,671 times
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I refused to learn to read before First Grade. Teacher reports I have been able to find state that I was one of the fastest learners of reading, more than making up for lost time. And this with an IQ of 79.
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