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Old 09-28-2019, 12:41 PM
 
6,225 posts, read 2,934,864 times
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My standard procedure:

Both hands on the wheel, window rolled down. When the officer approaches, I tell him, "Officer, my license and insurance card are in my left rear pocket. How would you like me to proceed?"

I don't want to get shot, so I am not going to do anything that a cop could mis-interpret.

 
Old 09-28-2019, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
4,862 posts, read 3,838,391 times
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[quote=EA;56285799]Moderator cut: Orphaned

oregonwoodsmoke wrote:

Quote:
Traffic stops are the second most likely place for a police officer to be murdered, so police are very cautious during traffic stops. (first most dangerous is the domestic violence call).
Cops are human beings with families to go home to at night. There are bad cops, just like there are bad people in other professions. Most of us don't want to live in lawless societies. If you do, I hear Somalia is lovely this time of year.

Last edited by june 7th; 09-28-2019 at 01:43 PM..
 
Old 09-28-2019, 03:03 PM
 
1,269 posts, read 358,038 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Msgenerse View Post
Yesterday around 3:00 PM my daughter got pulled over for speeding, she knows to show license and registration and after she got pulled over as the cop was walking up my daughter was going through her purse to get her license, but while she was doing it the cop yelled "Hey! Put your hands on the wheel!" she was very startled and did but got upset and started crying and the officer explained to get her license and registration which she did, but she said the officer wasn't nice and had a very authoritarian tone.

He came back and gave her a ticket and told her to slow down and left and she came home in tears. I understand speeding is a crime, I am not disputing that, but is it excessive for him to yell at her just for looking for her license in her purse?
I was taught by my parents as a child that in a traffic stop, you keep your hands where the cop can see them. He knows absolutely nothing about your daughter, who she is, what she is doing, what she is like; he doesn't know what's in her purse... whether she wants to offer him a breath mint or pull a gun into his face.

Something people tend to forget is that complete strangers know absolutely nothing about them. So they get offended because someone who doesn't know them from Adam doesn't immediately and automatically trust them-- the person buying their car wants it inspected, the woman on a secluded street late at night crosses to the other side, the parents watch when they're interacting with a kid, the cop is cautious. They get so huffy, because "I'm a good person!" Great. You're the only one in the situation who knows that; the other person has no way of having any clue.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
I learned this a few years ago when I got pulled over for speeding at night. I actually knew the cop as he was a regular customer where I work. For some reason I thought it would be a good idea to get out and stand beside my car. He let me know real quick like (and somewhat forcefully) that was NOT a good idea, to just sit there with my window down and hands on the wheel. I'm pretty sure this was never addressed way back when I took drivers ed, before shooting cops turned into the huge problem it seems to be now.
It's also for your safety. Idiots crash into cars next to the road (cops get hurt and killed that way). Outside of your car, that's someone else's car contacting your body directly. In some situations, if you're in your car, you might have a bit more of a chance (your car is protecting you).

I did it once, too... broken down waiting for the tow truck next to the freeway, a state cop pulls up to check on me. I wasn't even thinking (annoyed at the situation), got out to talk to him... the first thing he said was "get back in your car; I'll come to the window." And he was right. I see people broken down waiting for help next to their car... all it takes is for one passing motorist to lose control and plow into them at 70 mph. (Some of them are even standing next to a concrete barrier, or, between their car and the barrier! I would not want to be the person who has to clean up the aftermath if someone slams into them or their car.)
 
Old 09-28-2019, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Central, NJ
2,451 posts, read 5,117,284 times
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Not the least bit excessive. Hands on the wheel where the cop can see them, and don't move until he tells you to. Certainly don't rummage around in bags, closed compartments or under the seat. Tell them where your registration and license is, and wait for them to tell you to get it. .
 
Old 09-28-2019, 03:28 PM
 
8,106 posts, read 2,409,692 times
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Nope. We were taught to sit and wait till officer asks, then tell him/her hey its in my pocket/pocketbook/golve compartment/backpack whatever, and SLOWLY get it out.
 
Old 09-28-2019, 07:24 PM
 
30 posts, read 13,874 times
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I understand what you're all saying, but she's a real innocent looking girl and really, how many women have pulled a gun from their purse just to shoot a cop? He didn't need to yell.
 
Old 09-28-2019, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Ohio
15,272 posts, read 13,684,891 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Msgenerse View Post
I understand what you're all saying, but she's a real innocent looking girl and really, how many women have pulled a gun from their purse just to shoot a cop? He didn't need to yell.
Doesn't matter, looks can be deceiving, probably one of the first things cops are taught.

Your best move now is to explain the reason behind the cop's behavior to your daughter and make sure she knows it was nothing personal.....hopefully that will take the sting out of it.

Turn this into a teaching moment.....she can tell all of her friends what NOT to do when pulled over by a cop.
 
Old 09-28-2019, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
44,726 posts, read 43,220,757 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Msgenerse View Post
I understand what you're all saying, but she's a real innocent looking girl and really, how many women have pulled a gun from their purse just to shoot a cop? He didn't need to yell.
And she didn't need to speed.

He doesn't have any idea who she is, and its not his job to judge who seems to be innocent based on their appearance.

Hopefully he did her a favor, and she'll slow down.
 
Old 09-28-2019, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Winterpeg
938 posts, read 365,062 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Msgenerse View Post
I understand what you're all saying, but she's a real innocent looking girl and really, how many women have pulled a gun from their purse just to shoot a cop? He didn't need to yell.
What does “innocent looking” even mean? She was guilty of breaking the law, so so much for “looking” anything.

Did you address with her that if she hadn’t been breaking the law and drawing the attention of the cop, none of this would have happened? Seriously, if the worst thing that ever happens to her is that a cop yells at her, she should count herself lucky. So what if she cries, her feelings being hurt isn’t fatal.
 
Old 09-28-2019, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
17,667 posts, read 17,936,654 times
Reputation: 43344
Quote:
Originally Posted by Msgenerse View Post
I understand what you're all saying, but she's a real innocent looking girl and really, how many women have pulled a gun from their purse just to shoot a cop? He didn't need to yell.
I have a feeling that the police officer probably didn't yell, but talked loudly and firmly in an "I'm in control voice".
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