U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-12-2019, 01:35 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
20,676 posts, read 19,629,788 times
Reputation: 35615

Advertisements

air fresheners have been associated with adverse effects, such as migraine headaches, asthma attacks, mucosal symptoms, infant illness, and breathing difficulties.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...60132316304334

I've never heard of a school using air fresheners. They don't freshen the air; they just cover up the odor with another odor. And they are unhealthy. I didn't think people even used them anymore because of the hazards.

I think in a previous post, someone was talking about air FILTERS and those are good. They CLEAN the air. But an air freshener doesn't really clean or freshen the air, it practically poisons the air. That's why dr's offices often have signs banning perfumes and other smelly chemical products. They make people sick.

Maybe you need to google and find out what's actually in these "air fresheners" and then you will have a case as to why they are not good to use. I simply cannot imagine a teacher putting one of those smelly things in the classroom. Most people know better than to use them.
__________________
my posts as moderator will be in red. Moderator: Health&Wellness~Genealogy. The Rules--read here>>> TOS. If someone attacks you, do not reply. Hit REPORT.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-12-2019, 02:17 PM
 
1,247 posts, read 1,577,838 times
Reputation: 3624
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
air fresheners have been associated with adverse effects, such as migraine headaches, asthma attacks, mucosal symptoms, infant illness, and breathing difficulties.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...60132316304334

I've never heard of a school using air fresheners. They don't freshen the air; they just cover up the odor with another odor. And they are unhealthy. I didn't think people even used them anymore because of the hazards.

I think in a previous post, someone was talking about air FILTERS and those are good. They CLEAN the air. But an air freshener doesn't really clean or freshen the air, it practically poisons the air. That's why dr's offices often have signs banning perfumes and other smelly chemical products. They make people sick.

Maybe you need to google and find out what's actually in these "air fresheners" and then you will have a case as to why they are not good to use. I simply cannot imagine a teacher putting one of those smelly things in the classroom. Most people know better than to use them.
Exactly. And unfortunately, some teachers do use them in their classrooms. Not most, but on my former campus there were a handful whose classrooms smelled like a Bath and Bodyworks. It was nauseating. Kids (especially young kids) may not feel like they have the power to complain, but they're definitely harmful to kids with medical conditions and given the prevalence of asthma (8.4% of children) and the prevalence of migraine (1 in 5 women and 1 in 11 men and 7.7% of adolescents), there is simply no need for teachers to be bringing air fresheners, scented candles, potpourri, essential oils, or the like into their classrooms. Save it for your own home.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2019, 03:08 PM
 
1,247 posts, read 1,577,838 times
Reputation: 3624
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
Administration will probably see this as: "if you are the exception, you are the problem". Unless there are other cases reported, children all belonging to the same parent will be viewed as "one" case.
This is not how the 504 process works. Once a doctor's note is provided, the school will respond and need to develop a plan to provide reasonable accommodations for each child depending on their medical condition.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
Most cleaning products are scented, as well. It would be difficult (and likely more costly) to switch from Jani-King's house blend to something like Simple Green in all the schools.
Not necessarily. Triggers are highly individual. It may be that's it's the air fresheners that are the main problem, not the basic janitorial products (other than air fresheners.) And if there is a child with that level of sensitivity as indicated by their doctor's note, then the school needs to find a way to provide accommodation for their education. That is the law.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
It is not normal to have such a strong response to fragrances, they may very well have special environmental needs. The schools may not be obligated to accommodate them, I'm afraid.
Approximately 12% of the population who suffers from migraines and 8.4% of the population who suffers from asthma experiences a bad reaction to fragrances. They should not be used in school classrooms.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2019, 03:58 PM
 
4,458 posts, read 1,153,429 times
Reputation: 5227
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitkatbar View Post
This is not how the 504 process works. Once a doctor's note is provided, the school will respond and need to develop a plan to provide reasonable accommodations for each child depending on their medical condition.



Not necessarily. Triggers are highly individual. It may be that's it's the air fresheners that are the main problem, not the basic janitorial products (other than air fresheners.) And if there is a child with that level of sensitivity as indicated by their doctor's note, then the school needs to find a way to provide accommodation for their education. That is the law.



Approximately 12% of the population who suffers from migraines and 8.4% of the population who suffers from asthma experiences a bad reaction to fragrances. They should not be used in school classrooms.
How can teachers teach with 20+ students in the same classroom, all with different restrictions which may conflict with one another? How much time out of a 50-minute period must be taken to "reasonably accommodate" these students?

I remember a 6th grade project (circa 2000) that involved magazine clippings, where a girl from the other side of the room stomped around trying to find "who had the perfume". There was an ad in my magazine for cologne (with the fold-out-and-smell-it sample) she promptly ripped out the entire page and threw it away.

Ironically, she placed it in the trash can (no lid) which was actually closer to her than my magazine was. Undoubtedly there are some of these self-identifying people who enjoy power tripping over things like this and may be conflating a minor annoyance with a debilitating reaction.

Never heard of a 504 until today. It surely wasn't mentioned at any point in my school, or by my parents, nor my friends' parents. Here is my state's: http://www.ncpublicschools.org/docs/...section504.pdf
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2019, 04:03 PM
 
Location: The sleepy part of New York City
2,108 posts, read 1,303,561 times
Reputation: 4693
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
Where is the freshener located? It sounds like they're sitting right under it!

Administration will probably see this as: "if you are the exception, you are the problem". Unless there are other cases reported, children all belonging to the same parent will be viewed as "one" case.

Most cleaning products are scented, as well. It would be difficult (and likely more costly) to switch from Jani-King's house blend to something like Simple Green in all the schools. It is not normal to have such a strong response to fragrances, they may very well have special environmental needs. The schools may not be obligated to accommodate them, I'm afraid.
Public schools are legally obligated to give every child an education. If they can't provide it in the school itself, then they've got to make other arrangements, such as home schooling which can be costly and they'd probably opt for having that teacher remove the air freshener first because its a heck of a lot cheaper and they won't lose a teacher.

After reading some of these responses, I'm aghast and I never use that word. It's obvious some people don't understand the consequences for asthmatics to breathe in a chemical substance that causes them to have their airways constricted and make breathing difficult. It's not fun guys. Seriously. We like breathing. Hold your nose and then try breathing through a straw and you might get an indication of what it's like for us as we're going through an attack.. and that's only if it doesn't get worse and our airways close altogether which is unfortunately always a possibility.

Not all fragrances will bother us. Air fresheners especially those plug in ones send me right into an attack so there's no need for the school to change all their cleaning products if none of the others bothered her child.. The OP just needs the teacher to stop using it in the classroom.

Op.. I agree with what KitKatKit said. Most schools like to keep their problems in house. Go above their heads and outside the school and you may see some action. You're not asking for the world here. It's a simple solution but if they refuse to listen, make waves until they do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2019, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
9,771 posts, read 8,709,394 times
Reputation: 21388
Just be thankful it isn't that awful fabuloso.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2019, 07:04 PM
 
4,603 posts, read 1,985,313 times
Reputation: 9215
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
How can teachers teach with 20+ students in the same classroom, all with different restrictions which may conflict with one another? How much time out of a 50-minute period must be taken to "reasonably accommodate" these students?

I remember a 6th grade project (circa 2000) that involved magazine clippings, where a girl from the other side of the room stomped around trying to find "who had the perfume". There was an ad in my magazine for cologne (with the fold-out-and-smell-it sample) she promptly ripped out the entire page and threw it away.

Ironically, she placed it in the trash can (no lid) which was actually closer to her than my magazine was. Undoubtedly there are some of these self-identifying people who enjoy power tripping over things like this and may be conflating a minor annoyance with a debilitating reaction.

Never heard of a 504 until today. It surely wasn't mentioned at any point in my school, or by my parents, nor my friends' parents. Here is my state's: http://www.ncpublicschools.org/docs/...section504.pdf
Many schools are peanut free environments. There appears to be no difficulty with this. If someone’s problem is plugged in air fresheners, it is a pretty easy and cheap fix to remove those from the classroom. My office is an air freshener, sprayed scent, diffuser free environment. We have a few people with allergies (me included) and when people spray scents, it can permeate through half the office building due to the horrible ventilation system. I remember one time someone sprayed something before she left for the day and when she opened her office door, the smell came into where I was sitting and my eyes started burning/tearing up immediately and I had trouble breathing. I also have trouble breathing when stores decide they need to put like 20 seasonal air fresheners right at the entrance.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2019, 11:18 PM
 
58 posts, read 9,185 times
Reputation: 152
Thank you for your responses. It was a private school and I figured they didn't value my kid, or any other, enough to stop using air freshener. So it's just as well he doesn't attend anymore. The scent blasted us in the face when entering the building. One of the staff also sold those scentsy wax burners, and half the teachers used those in their classrooms....Our local public school doesn't use this stuff. I don't think they're allowed to?

Last edited by Withinpines; 11-12-2019 at 11:26 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-13-2019, 09:02 AM
 
2,009 posts, read 744,508 times
Reputation: 3668
Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdieBelle View Post
I've never experienced an air freshener that caused people's hair and clothing to smell.

As an adult who has severe fragrance sensitivities (to the point where I no longer go to malls or stores like Bed Bath & Beyond) I can wholeheartedly sympathize with the OP. And yes, many air fresheners and fragrance candles "cling" to both hair and clothing.

I recently had to switch dentists and their waiting room has one of those plug-in "aromatherapy" units that emit a scent of lavender. It begins to affect me in about five minutes and I've learned to phone their office about 30 minutes before I arrive for my appointment to ask them to turn it off. If I turn it off when I come in, there is still too much of it in the air for my 'safe breathing.' I do not have athsma but my reaction affects my sinuses and my eyes very badly and triggers a "one sided" migraine. Just the other day I went to a friend's house and had to leave after about 10 minutes because they had one of those awful cinnamon fragrance candles burning in the kitchen and it permeated the entire first floor even after they blew it out. I barely managed to drive home safely because my eyes were burning, tearing, and starting to swell up. Due to another medical condition I cannot be given epi in any form, nor take any medication that affects the central nervous system, and so avoidance is my only option.

IMHO schools should regard air fresheners the same way they regard foods that have nuts in them: As a health hazard for certain students.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

¬© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top