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Old 09-12-2008, 01:42 PM
 
25,278 posts, read 27,422,500 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 925mine View Post
Arrogance is presuming you are an authority and always right, no matter what the circumstances. That teacher is arrogant as well. He is also racist. My daughter is bi-racial in an almost exclusively white upper-middle class district. He resented having to have her in his classroom since he has the most 'elite' children. So yes, he DID decide the instant he laid eyes on her that he'd break her.
Oh, I'm playing the odds here to say that that probably didn't happen the way you claim. Could it be that maybe, just maybe, that the teacher wouldn't indulge in this behavior for fear of a lawsuit? Moderator cut: partial cut Is this within the realm of possibility? Because if this guy was indeed acting in a way that could remotely have been identified as racist, I guarantee you that the school would have either thrown him out, forced him into early retirement, or had him performing the worst kind of scut work as penance.

Moderator cut: partial cut

Last edited by jeannie216; 09-13-2008 at 08:03 AM..
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Old 09-12-2008, 02:13 PM
 
3,842 posts, read 6,858,749 times
Reputation: 3120
Quote:
Originally Posted by yankeegirl313 View Post
Its time!
He has been moved 4 times since school has started, in a month!
Now, she has moved him off in a corner, away from the other kids.
Something isn`t right.
My son also said that she took a book out of his hands and threw it against the wall. Enough is enough!
Are teachers allowed to tell the parents that she thinks the kid has ADD, or not?
No. Something is not right.

And if I've said it once, I'll say it a gizillion more times. It's also in preparation for when my little ones start school....

Be a grown-up professional to the teacher. Be a parent to your child.


If a teacher throws a book, I guarantee EVERY single parent of a child in that class knows about it along with all the kids in on the bus, in the cafeteria & it seeps into the teachers lounge. And I guarantee 1/2 of the parents call the principal about it, also.

Little Johnny is not a sweetheart 100% of the time in school. This pertains to EVERYONE'S child.

Some teachers are darn right mean & nasty & should not be teaching.

I remember a very specific incident one year when I was teaching 6th grade. A boy in the class was just pushing my buttons. They all do in their own way; it's their job . I was just having a tough day; trying to do too much. I lost my cool & sternly reprimanded him in front of the class. Very unnecessary on MY part b/c I targeted him. Wrote a very harsh letter home to mom & dad. Mom & dad called that night & made an appt with me for 7:30am the next morning. By the time 7:30am rolled around, I was humilated & embarassed. Had a great talk with his parents. Unfortunately, and I don't blame him, it took the boy some time to trust me again. I promised myself from that day on not to do the incidents that triggered my very poor behavior. I give credit to his parents for taking the time & giving me a chance. I give credit to the boy for giving me a smile a few weeks later. A truly great family who helped a very naive teacher.

Your child is watching EVERY single move & word you say about this incident. If you discuss this with your child, just be aware you are teaching him how to behave & respond to difficult situations.

Be the bigger person. Be a parent. Give your child the benefit of the doubt but also remind yourself that there is a little bit of your child's involvement in the situation.

Good luck.

Last edited by 121804; 09-12-2008 at 02:24 PM..
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Old 09-12-2008, 02:47 PM
 
4,479 posts, read 6,108,376 times
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Maybe I'm missing something regarding the original post - have you already talked to the teacher/emailed the teacher, didn't get a good understanding what was going on and that is why the principal is now involved?

I'm guess I'm just thinking that would be my last resort because going over her head would only aggravate the problem. Maybe I'm missed another post somewhere about the situation.
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Old 09-12-2008, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Moon Over Palmettos
5,970 posts, read 12,397,386 times
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Well, I can pretty much vouch that my kids are well behaved in class, so when one of them comes home complaining about a teacher, they get a good grilling on details. My daughter is now in 9th grade and had complained about her 8th grade science teacher as frequently making racist remarks (he's African American in a predominantly white classroom in the South) so we proceeded to interrogate her in detail about frequency, types of slur remarks made etc. When we questioned her about why they would not complain to the principal about this, she said that they had no convincing proof, as the teacher would just deny it. It would be their word against his. And they are just all afraid of the repercussions as the teacher just appears to be vindictive. So much so that many students in the class have tempted fate and have contemplated turning on their cell phones just to be able to record it and have proof, although we've cautioned her one, that this is against school policy and that her phone could be confiscated, and two, we weren't sure that this was admissible in a hearing anyway. So all of them just grin and bore it and happily made it out of middle school. She was very very uncomfortable with it though. We were rather proud of her mature attitude, although I feel sorry that I could not do more for the next class.
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Old 09-12-2008, 03:02 PM
 
4,479 posts, read 6,108,376 times
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One other thing I would like to mention. Just because you may be dealing with issues with your child, don't assume you and your child will now become a target for a teacher/principal. If you are working with them, as partners, in whatever situation is going on, in my experience it has only strengthened our ties with the teachers and principal.

When our son was in elementary, he had a bit of a temper problem. It would sort of come out of no where and maybe a couple of times a year. We were working with him at home on how to recognize those feelings, how to handle it, etc. - but every once in a while....
Well, he was always such a sweet, quiet kid in school, so when he would blow, it would shock the teacher. He was very small for his age - but didn't put up with any crap from other kids. Anyway, I got to the point I would pre-warn the teacher at the beginning of the school year. It made things better and towards the end of elementary he never had any incidents again.
He did have one kid that he would but heads with a bit, and a few time he and the other boy would end up in desks outside the principals office doing their work. I guess because I was so open about Dylan, volunteered a lot up at the school so I knew everyone and the in's and out's - these little things were no big deal. Learning experiences for Dylan. We've always, always talked to him about the fact that throughout life there will be those you don't get along with - maybe just flat out don't like, but you have to learn how to deal with that because you'll meet many along the way - bosses, teachers, etc. that you don't always click with.
He's now in high school and in general has been lucky along the way in regards to teachers. Even the one last year that he thought was so weird and didn't like when school started - ended up being one of his favorite classes. She was odd but a good teacher.
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Old 09-12-2008, 03:30 PM
 
698 posts, read 1,318,514 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drjones96 View Post
Would you be from Missouri by chance? Just asking. There was an incident back in the day at Poplar Bluff High School that involved a Band Teacher. (not naming names) He was banging several students. Had a similar temper. He also used to tune piano's during the summer. He tuned the one in our church and ours at home.
There are MORE???

No, that was in Michigan, Tri County HS (very small) The other teachers ended up divorcing their wives and marrying students. This particular one was divorced by his wife and he remarried as well, but not until after he left that district.

Funny how they were all popular and much loved teachers, then they pull stuff like that. I guess they thought they were invinceable.

But yeah, he would fling things across the room all the time. And have sex with students as young as 14.
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Old 09-12-2008, 04:16 PM
 
Location: beautiful North Carolina
7,574 posts, read 7,191,785 times
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okay, lets see if we can keep this thread on topic without the daggers flying, if not we'll have to close this thread permanently.

Last edited by jeannie216; 09-13-2008 at 08:21 AM..
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Old 09-13-2008, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
466 posts, read 814,867 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 121804 View Post

If a teacher throws a book, I guarantee EVERY single parent of a child in that class knows about it along with all the kids in on the bus, in the cafeteria & it seeps into the teachers lounge. And I guarantee 1/2 of the parents call the principal about it, also.

Agreed!!!

I am a teacher and if something like this happend it would have spread like wildfire before the day was out and the principal would have had an office FULL of unhappy parents the next morning.

Also, has the teacher contacted you in the past about moving your son or is this the first time you have heard anything about it?
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Old 09-14-2008, 07:28 PM
 
Location: NJ
7,126 posts, read 13,826,295 times
Reputation: 3868
Quote:
Originally Posted by yankeegirl313 View Post
Its time!
He has been moved 4 times since school has started, in a month!
Now, she has moved him off in a corner, away from the other kids.
Something isn`t right.
My son also said that she took a book out of his hands and threw it against the wall. Enough is enough!
Are teachers allowed to tell the parents that she thinks the kid has ADD, or not?
What do you think about your child having ADD?
How is his concentration?
Do you feel that what she said needs to be followed up on?

I'm a parent that had no clue. She was always smart & did things early, walking, climbing, riding a 2 wheeled bike, speaking. She seemed to know what was taught until she got a little older, that's when I realized her mind was racing and she wasn't able to pay attention. Still some how she managed to get decent grades on most things.

The way I look at it as a parent; my child is in class all day with the teacher and while the teacher is not a doctor, they should be able to let you know that the child shows signs of ADD or ADHD as they've seen it before.

While a kid might not show signs at home, they aren't sitting home trying to do work all day, they are able to go from one thing to another when they feel like it. In class they don't have the option to get up and switch activities.

Keep your eyes open and if you can swing it, maybe take him to be evaluated. The sooner you do that, the sooner he will be able to function in class if he is having problems.

Now I know that some teachers like a roomful of medicated kids, it's what's easier & I was highly against medication but looking back, had I followed through with medication maybe I wouldn't have such a hard time getting her to take it now that she's older. She does see a difference when she takes it.

She had one teacher in 3rd grade who swore she was bi-polar and argued with me after I had a diagnoses of ADHD. IMO the teacher was bi-polar.

Do some research. If you feel it needs to be followed up on, do that.
If he does have it, thank the teacher for being concerned. Some teachers would rather write kids up then to reach out to parents.
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