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Old 04-30-2009, 12:29 PM
 
3,842 posts, read 9,245,562 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
I think school officials in urban areas are very well aware of the problems that they create when there is an unexpected change in school schedules. The issues created when school is closed for a long time (like after the hurricanes) go beyond simple childcare issues.
This new flu is the perfect time for the government to truly look at how traditional schools are designed & run. Tell me all the whining & complaing that is going on in FT Worth right now b/c the 2 extra weeks in June are going to be cutting into family vacations or camps or this & that. The parents who are going to be using up vacation time NOW instead of in the summer. Parents who are going to be taking UNPAID time off. The HUGE issue of getting children refocused or even caring about school come 2 1/2 weeks from now.

The public school system in this country is a mess & its relationship with employers is even worse.

The issues that are being currently being created extend well beyond simple childcare issues.

When a relative dies or a child is ill from school for several days, parents have NO problems with expecting the school to jump through hoops to accomdate their child. For many parents, this is a harsh wake up call that they do not want.

Year round schooling with mandatory family readiness plans. Either that or continue on with the disasterous mess that is US public education.
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Old 04-30-2009, 12:53 PM
 
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I live in the Fort Worth area, though my kids are in a different school district.

The FWISD has a large percentage of Hispanic families that take frequent trips to Mexico where the original outbreak seems to have begun. Adding that information to the fact there are now two confirmed cases in Fort Worth, two more in another nearby city and 21 probable cases, they have no choice but to take that precaution.

The city has canceled Mayfest and Cinco de Mayo for this weekend, which is are very popular spring events that bring thousands of people and tons of money, all out of caution as well.

I'm positive that FWISD would not have shut down if they thought the cases would be limited and contained. This closure will at the very least affect the next 6 weeks. State standardized testing is this week. UIL competitions were this weekend. Playoffs/tournaments are affected. End of school year and graduations may have to be delayed as well. It's a scheduling nightmare, but it's the lesser of the two choices.

Oh, and they are only closed for 2 days this week and all next week, not 2 1/2 weeks or 3-6 weeks like has been mentioned. Perhaps somewhere else might have that time, just not here.
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Old 04-30-2009, 01:19 PM
 
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But coming from a hurricane area the decision in this case is much different. those are usually forced more by events. This is more like when to evacuate with a hurricane nearby.My experience is that those who have a plan and prepare rather than wait for government to save them are much better off.It can be the difference between suffering disaster and castrophy many times.
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Old 04-30-2009, 01:43 PM
 
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You know, there really has been no explanation of how long of a time period a school would need to close for to "quarantine" or isolate an outbreak. How does that work? I mean, if my kids' school closes down fora week and my boys are healthy, does that mean the virus has left the building?
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Old 04-30-2009, 02:04 PM
 
1,986 posts, read 3,468,180 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cdc3217 View Post
You know, there really has been no explanation of how long of a time period a school would need to close for to "quarantine" or isolate an outbreak. How does that work? I mean, if my kids' school closes down fora week and my boys are healthy, does that mean the virus has left the building?
That's Elvis

How do they figure it will be ok in a week or two? Since this 'pandemic' has barely gotten underway you'd think it would last a couple months or so before it was eradicated. If they close schools now and the worst of it does't come for another 3 or 4 weeks, that means the end of the school year at the very least before kids could even think about going back.
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Old 04-30-2009, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Niles, Michigan
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Thsts what I mean in some areas you might as well end the school year if you are going to keep staying closed. Most schools get out in June anyway.
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Old 04-30-2009, 02:41 PM
 
2,466 posts, read 4,204,094 times
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I just want to know why this flu and no other flus are considered a possible pandemic? So far most of the outbreaks and deaths have mainly occured in Mexico. The other areas that are having outbreaks are places that have some sort of Mexican connections. Like the kids in New York who are sick with it, they just recently came back from a trip to Mexico. The others in TX and in CA also have some sort of Mexican conncetion. I imagine that the other countries who are having an outbreak also has some sort of Mexican connection.

What makes an illness a pandemic? is it considered a pandemic after so many deaths or because of the type of illness? If it is based on the number of deaths, then why isn't regular flu considered a pandemic especially when an average of 36,000 people in the USA alone die each year from complications of flu and 1000's more are hospitalized because of the flu.

I am not saying it's not wrong to be concerned about this flu, but I think a lot of it is hyped up so someone somewhere can either look good, or make tons of money or both.
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Old 04-30-2009, 02:53 PM
 
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I wondered the same also. I know more deaths have happened in Mexico but I thought maybe that was because of the poor sanitary conditions in some of the places.

36,000 a year die from the reg. flu, I guess the reason they are worried about this is because reg. flu deaths are mostly the elderly and babies and people with compromised immune systems but this one seems to be hitting even young healthy adults. Hopefully it doesn't get as bad here with the deaths.
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Old 04-30-2009, 03:04 PM
 
3,842 posts, read 9,245,562 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wyoquilter View Post
I just want to know why this flu and no other flus are considered a possible pandemic? So far most of the outbreaks and deaths have mainly occured in Mexico. The other areas that are having outbreaks are places that have some sort of Mexican connections. Like the kids in New York who are sick with it, they just recently came back from a trip to Mexico. The others in TX and in CA also have some sort of Mexican conncetion. I imagine that the other countries who are having an outbreak also has some sort of Mexican connection.

What makes an illness a pandemic? is it considered a pandemic after so many deaths or because of the type of illness? If it is based on the number of deaths, then why isn't regular flu considered a pandemic especially when an average of 36,000 people in the USA alone die each year from complications of flu and 1000's more are hospitalized because of the flu.

I am not saying it's not wrong to be concerned about this flu, but I think a lot of it is hyped up so someone somewhere can either look good, or make tons of money or both.
The H1N1 Influenza A Strain is currently considered a pandemic b/c THIS strain is spreading through populations & geographic regions. Think of it like a spiderweb with MX being the center of the web.

The seasonal flu goes through different strains at different times. 8yr old Sally may have influenza but not the SAME influenza that 8yr old Johnny who sits next to her in art class has been diagnosed.

The 100+ cases throughout the world are all the same strain that are being linked to the same start point.

Schools are in a crappy position right now. Not only are they dealing with the end of the school year, but this flu. And since no one has had this flu before, they have to be quite vigilant b/c we are talking about children & god forbid the maniac that would set in if a 10yr old from an affluent suburb who sat next to a boy who took spring break in Cabo died from this strain & the unending news coverage we'd hear b/c the school didn't close.

A LOT & I mean, A LOT of this is political & economic based. And that is why schools are treading a very fine line.
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Old 04-30-2009, 03:19 PM
 
Location: chicagoland
1,636 posts, read 3,656,853 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wyoquilter View Post
I just want to know why this flu and no other flus are considered a possible pandemic? So far most of the outbreaks and deaths have mainly occured in Mexico. The other areas that are having outbreaks are places that have some sort of Mexican connections. Like the kids in New York who are sick with it, they just recently came back from a trip to Mexico. The others in TX and in CA also have some sort of Mexican conncetion. I imagine that the other countries who are having an outbreak also has some sort of Mexican connection.

What makes an illness a pandemic? is it considered a pandemic after so many deaths or because of the type of illness? If it is based on the number of deaths, then why isn't regular flu considered a pandemic especially when an average of 36,000 people in the USA alone die each year from complications of flu and 1000's more are hospitalized because of the flu.

I am not saying it's not wrong to be concerned about this flu, but I think a lot of it is hyped up so someone somewhere can either look good, or make tons of money or both.

From my understanding the levels have to do with how many geographical areas the flu has spread to.

It means it's time to take action.

We are already WAY ahead of the 1918 and the 1976 flu. That has to say something

WHO | Current WHO phase of pandemic alert (http://www.who.int/csr/disease/avian_influenza/phase/en/index.html - broken link)
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