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Old 04-30-2009, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,492,358 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stormy night View Post
Twins oftentimes will communicate in their own made up language and as long as each other understands, they don't find it necessary to learn other people's language for quite some time.

A lot of twins communicate with each other with words no one else understands well into childhood and use plain old english to communicate with everybody else.
Oh, and I forgot to add that their nanny is Chinese and speaks Chinese to them. Maybe all that babbling is actually words!
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Old 04-30-2009, 12:04 PM
 
3,422 posts, read 9,432,996 times
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Oh Denverian I was also thinking about two of my kids. My middle two children are 12 mos apart and shared a room til the oldest was 6.

They used to babble to each other a lot. As time went on, the older one could often translate what the younger one was saying. I loved listening to them babble to each other.

What did happen, and I don't know how common this is, and if it was because one was older than the other, but the younger one lagged way behind in his articulation and by the time he started 4yo preK, he was about 2 yrs behind in articulation. Fine vocabulary, good sentence structure and grammar, but poor articulation. I knew he was a little hard to understand, but his vocabulary, ability to express himself, and context fooled me into thinking he was not as behind as he was. This yr, in K, his SLP said she had never heard a child with so many phoneme errors be so understandable.

So, its just something to think about - it might not be common in twins, who are the same age, as it is with closely-spaced children, where a younger one can rely on an older one.
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Old 04-30-2009, 12:18 PM
 
3,842 posts, read 9,239,863 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
OK, what's wrong with our twin boys? At 12 months, neither one says anything. I think one of them said the dog's name a few times the other day. I keep repeating words over and over, read them the same book every night with pictues of different animals and repeat the name of the animal and sound they make...

I think I heard somewhere that multiples don't talk as early - maybe because they don't get quite as much one on one attention? But then when I'm talking to one, the other one is usually right there, and I make an effort to always address both of them equally. Or maybe because they were a month premature.
First off, you have multiples & statistically, multiples cognitive, mental, and physical development is at a different pace during the early years. They were also born early which again, statistically, at 12 months, they are still playing some catch up.

So, your trip to the ped with TWO is completely different than someone with ONE

One REALLY fun & interesting thing multiples do & you may have noticed is that they develop their own communication system with one another. Watch them "talk" to each other & then see if that "talk" carries over into their "communication" with you. They have an incredible sense of dependence & security on EACH OTHER & the way they communicate to each other many times is based on comfort, security & need. While they know that your partner & you are their parents...they are more secure & comforted with one another right now. So, that is some of the reasoning for why multiples have a tendency to develop their own communication pattern with each other instead of the adults around them.

Sometimes, give them the book and let them try to read or at least turn the pages at their own pace. This will also allow you to concentrate on what stands out to them...does a ball catch their attention or does a particular animal...those sort of things.

NOTHING IS WRONG WITH YOUR CHILDREN

The whole "keeping up with the Joneses" breed of parenting really is a waste.

For a single birth baby born at the typical gestation period, speech can start anywhere b/w 6-18 months. If at 18 months a single birth baby is showing signs of a speech delay, there is the appropriate speech therapy available if a parent so desires. Some parents wait until 24 months for speech therapy.

They are going to catch on & then again, statistically, they may have a tendency to develop healthier relationships & manage conflict better than the average child b/c they were multiples!

Best thing you can do for their speech development is what you are doing. Don't worry. You will know when to worry. Right now is not it

Last edited by 121804; 04-30-2009 at 12:35 PM..
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Old 04-30-2009, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Aurora, Colorado
2,212 posts, read 4,493,155 times
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Everyone repeat after me:

I vow not to compare my kids with other kids. My kids are unique and just because another child is doing algebra at age 6 and can read Jane Austen at age 7 does not mean that they are going to excel any more at life than my own children.

My 14 month old grunts for everything. She points at what she wants and then grunts. She does say "more" when she's done with her milk/juice. She knows what many words are because when I say where's mama/dada/dog/sister, she looks right at them and points. I talk to her constantly and more like a grown up than a baby. My husband always says, "who are you talking to?" and I'll say the baby. We read constantly and sing and there is a constant dialogue in our house. At her 12 month appointment, I filled out a questionnaire about her speaking. When I said she didn't say any discernable words, her pediatrician didn't say a thing. She is a great pediatrician so I am sure if there was something to be worried about, she would have mentioned it.

Do not worry about your kids' development. If they are not making eye contact or banging their head repeatedly, go see a doctor. If they just aren't saying anything yet, don't rush them. Trust me (I have a 6 year old) and enjoy the quiet. It won't be long where you are getting 45 minute diatribes about everything that went on in their classrooms.
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Old 04-30-2009, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,492,358 times
Reputation: 10428
Quote:
Originally Posted by 121804 View Post


First off, you have multiples & statistically, multiples cognitive, mental, and physical development is at a different pace during the early years. They were also born early which again, statistically, at 12 months, they are still playing some catch up.

So, your trip to the ped with TWO is completely different than someone with ONE

One REALLY fun & interesting thing multiples do & you may have noticed is that they develop their own communication system with one another. Watch them "talk" to each other & then see if that "talk" carries over into their "communication" with you. They have an incredible sense of dependence & security on EACH OTHER & the way they communicate to each other many times is based on comfort, security & need. While they know that your partner & you are their parents...they are more secure & comforted with one another right now. So, that is some of the reasoning for why multiples have a tendency to develop their own communication pattern with each other instead of the adults around them.

Sometimes, give them the book and let them try to read or at least turn the pages at their own pace. This will also allow you to concentrate on what stands out to them...does a ball catch their attention or does a particular animal...those sort of things.

NOTHING IS WRONG WITH YOUR CHILDREN

The whole "keeping up with the Joneses" breed of parenting really is a waste.

For a single birth baby born at the typical gestation period, speech can start anywhere b/w 6-18 months. If at 18 months a single birth baby is showing signs of a speech delay, there is the appropriate speech therapy available if a parent so desires. Some parents wait until 24 months for speech therapy.

They are going to catch on & then again, statistically, they may have a tendency to develop healthier relationships & manage conflict better than the average child b/c they were multiples!

Best thing you can do for their speech development is what you are doing. Don't worry. You will know when to worry. Right now is not it
Thanks! I'm going to listen more when they're interracting with each other. It's just so darn cute when they play! Well, until the bigger boy decides to body slam the smaller one He's turning into a bit of a bully lately, so we try to stop that behavior (put him in the pack-n-play) when he starts with the pushing/taking of his brother's toy, etc. But they do seem very normal to me.
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Old 04-30-2009, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Maine
650 posts, read 1,925,523 times
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My girls each spoke a LOT by the time they turned one. I remember counting words for my oldest but the actual number slips my mind now. I'm sure I have it written down in her baby book or something and I know it was at least 3 times whatever the books claimed was average.

My oldest son didn't speak much at all until he turned 2 1/2 or 3. He had tons of sign language, but very few spoken words aside from Momma and Dadda.

My youngest son is brilliant! He just turned 2 and has been speaking in full sentences for a long time. He easily has 300 words. He counts, can identify some letters and recite books.

All kids are different, and in the grand scheme of things no one is going to remember who spoke when. It all evens out!
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Old 04-30-2009, 01:32 PM
 
1,986 posts, read 3,465,565 times
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My brother, being the youngest of five, was about a year old when he would sit in his highchair at the dinner table, point at what he wanted and did a vocalization like Tarzan. We had to guess what it was he was pointing at. If we were wrong, he simply shook his head, pointed and did the Tarzan yell again until we got it right.

He seldom had to talk because our youngest sister was three years older and did all his talking. The rest of us were 9, 11 and 12.
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Old 04-30-2009, 01:37 PM
 
7,099 posts, read 23,885,607 times
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I had a deaf Daughter-in-law. Her son had learned to sign several signs long before he was 1 yr old. Was this "talking?"

There is also the problem that some children have with shaping the tongue and lips properly. Talking early is like crawling or walking early. In the long run, it doesn't mean much.

My two oldest were 16 months apart. They learned twin-speak about the same time. jabberjabberjabber all day long. We seldom understood a word they said. We would have to ask the third son what they meant. He spoke early and was able to speak to us and to them.
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Old 04-30-2009, 01:53 PM
 
Location: chicagoland
1,636 posts, read 3,653,671 times
Reputation: 1061
Quote:
Originally Posted by the3Ds View Post
Everyone repeat after me:

I vow not to compare my kids with other kids. My kids are unique and just because another child is doing algebra at age 6 and can read Jane Austen at age 7 does not mean that they are going to excel any more at life than my own children.

My 14 month old grunts for everything. She points at what she wants and then grunts. She does say "more" when she's done with her milk/juice. She knows what many words are because when I say where's mama/dada/dog/sister, she looks right at them and points. I talk to her constantly and more like a grown up than a baby. My husband always says, "who are you talking to?" and I'll say the baby. We read constantly and sing and there is a constant dialogue in our house. At her 12 month appointment, I filled out a questionnaire about her speaking. When I said she didn't say any discernable words, her pediatrician didn't say a thing. She is a great pediatrician so I am sure if there was something to be worried about, she would have mentioned it.

Do not worry about your kids' development. If they are not making eye contact or banging their head repeatedly, go see a doctor. If they just aren't saying anything yet, don't rush them. Trust me (I have a 6 year old) and enjoy the quiet. It won't be long where you are getting 45 minute diatribes about everything that went on in their classrooms.

I don't think any of us are going to repeat that. We are not doing that. I was just curious. Asking for facts isn't a bad thing. Just wanted to know. I actually thought it was funny how the doctor and articles say "average." I never liked when people use average a statistic. I like the MODE much better. It shows what is really going on. Heck, one kid out there could be speaking like 9837459347597345937 words by 12 months and what does THAT say for the average?
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Old 04-30-2009, 01:55 PM
 
758 posts, read 1,594,562 times
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Well baby is now 21 mos and still no words. He says hot actually I wonder why? Maybe he is trying to tell me something! Any way we were just at the Drs today and I asked him again if I should be worried, he said nope he's not displaying any signs of autism and that's the biggest worry when they are late to talk.

He has done everything else early though so I just figured he's more into doing rather than saying. No armchair quaterback here!
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