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Old 04-30-2009, 07:44 AM
 
Location: chicagoland
1,636 posts, read 2,505,130 times
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Default How many words did/does your 1yr old know

Of course since she is our little girl we think she is a genious! I asked her doctor how many words the average child her age knows/recites and he said on average about 20!

WHAAAAAAT??? I wrote down all the words my little girl says regularly and the list was at 60 words! She even speaks sentences! "dadda go work money," lol.

I'm thinking because it's "average" many children are much lower and MANY children are much higher?

What about your toddler?
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Old 04-30-2009, 07:58 AM
 
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All three of mine recited Robert Louis Stevenson by a year old and carried on conversations. Seriously. If you talk to babies all the time, the learn very early to talk as well. It's all in the effort the parent makes.
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Old 04-30-2009, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
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OK, what's wrong with our twin boys? At 12 months, neither one says anything. I think one of them said the dog's name a few times the other day. I keep repeating words over and over, read them the same book every night with pictues of different animals and repeat the name of the animal and sound they make...

I think I heard somewhere that multiples don't talk as early - maybe because they don't get quite as much one on one attention? But then when I'm talking to one, the other one is usually right there, and I make an effort to always address both of them equally. Or maybe because they were a month premature.
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Old 04-30-2009, 08:10 AM
 
Location: chicagoland
1,636 posts, read 2,505,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
OK, what's wrong with our twin boys? At 12 months, neither one says anything. I think one of them said the dog's name a few times the other day. I keep repeating words over and over, read them the same book every night with pictues of different animals and repeat the name of the animal and sound they make...

I think I heard somewhere that multiples don't talk as early - maybe because they don't get quite as much one on one attention? But then when I'm talking to one, the other one is usually right there, and I make an effort to always address both of them equally. Or maybe because they were a month premature.

That's what I'm saying. The doctors and some sources say that 20 is an AVERAGE. Which means that a very large number and/or a very small number can make the mode (most occuring # that being the REAL # of children who know a certain # of words) NOT noticed???

I think the twins are fine! lol I did read somewhere that twins talk less and not as quickly because they communticate to each other on a different level? I have no experience with twins.

I know my hubby has off today because two women have a flu of some sort, so I get to play on the computer a bit!

I also think MY kid just LIKES to talk alot like her mommy! She's reading a book right now that has babies on it and she's saying "BAYby book red (read)" too cute
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Old 04-30-2009, 08:13 AM
 
Location: chicagoland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stormy night View Post
All three of mine recited Robert Louis Stevenson by a year old and carried on conversations. Seriously. If you talk to babies all the time, the learn very early to talk as well. It's all in the effort the parent makes.

Well we all know ( especially you ) that miasommy likes to talk! I guess that's why Mia is such a talker/reader.

Now she's looking at Mr Brown Can Moo and she's saying "boom boom boom!" and "shplaaaat"

I agree that if you talk and talk and talk and read and read and read, they will talk and talk and read and read.

I read to my little girl when I was pregnant and when she was born and at least 10 books a day!

But in seldom cases the kid is going to do what the kid is going to do I guess
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Old 04-30-2009, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miasmommy View Post
That's what I'm saying. The doctors and some sources say that 20 is an AVERAGE. Which means that a very large number and/or a very small number can make the mode (most occuring # that being the REAL # of children who know a certain # of words) NOT noticed???

I think the twins are fine! lol I did read somewhere that twins talk less and not as quickly because they communticate to each other on a different level? I have no experience with twins.

I know my hubby has off today because two women have a flu of some sort, so I get to play on the computer a bit!

I also think MY kid just LIKES to talk alot like her mommy! She's reading a book right now that has babies on it and she's saying "BAYby book red (read)" too cute
They do babble back and forth to each other like they know what they're talking about. Our next door neighbors have a baby girl who's one week younger than our boys, and she's not talking yet either. 20 words sounds like an awful lot for this age!
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Old 04-30-2009, 09:03 AM
 
3,425 posts, read 5,939,843 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
OK, what's wrong with our twin boys? At 12 months, neither one says anything. I think one of them said the dog's name a few times the other day. I keep repeating words over and over, read them the same book every night with pictues of different animals and repeat the name of the animal and sound they make...

I think I heard somewhere that multiples don't talk as early - maybe because they don't get quite as much one on one attention? But then when I'm talking to one, the other one is usually right there, and I make an effort to always address both of them equally. Or maybe because they were a month premature.
Some kids have different rates of learning communication - expressive communication is only one form and, after a slow start, usually comes in a language explosion sometime between 12-24 mos. Many children who do not have as many words as their peers are doing just fine in the area of receptive communication (which is understanding what is being said to them). My 20 month old does not say many words but we can talk to him or ask him to do something and he understands us. I had a similar experience with my oldest. He was a "late talker" but during the screening process it was determined his receptive language was ahead the average, and once he did have his language explosion, he sped ahead of his peers and developed a large vocabulary and advanced-for-his-age way of speaking.

What you are doing is the right way to work with them - just narrate your day, and read picture books and name everything. As long as they don't have any physical impairment involving muscles, etc....that affect their speech, they should start talking on their own schedule. At the 18 mo appt, your ped can screen them and do a referral to early intervention for testing if he/she feels they are behind. In addition, at any time you have a concern, you can self-refer to early intervention (sometimes called child find).

Children vary in their skills at this age and often lag on some to focus on others. Try not to compare to anyone else individually, just look at the averages and the "warning signs".

HTH
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Old 04-30-2009, 09:13 AM
 
1,986 posts, read 2,328,601 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
They do babble back and forth to each other like they know what they're talking about.
Twins oftentimes will communicate in their own made up language and as long as each other understands, they don't find it necessary to learn other people's language for quite some time.

A lot of twins communicate with each other with words no one else understands well into childhood and use plain old english to communicate with everybody else.
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Old 04-30-2009, 09:14 AM
 
Location: chicagoland
1,636 posts, read 2,505,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lisdol View Post
Some kids have different rates of learning communication - expressive communication is only one form and, after a slow start, usually comes in a language explosion sometime between 12-24 mos. Many children who do not have as many words as their peers are doing just fine in the area of receptive communication (which is understanding what is being said to them). My 20 month old does not say many words but we can talk to him or ask him to do something and he understands us. I had a similar experience with my oldest. He was a "late talker" but during the screening process it was determined his receptive language was ahead the average, and once he did have his language explosion, he sped ahead of his peers and developed a large vocabulary and advanced-for-his-age way of speaking.

What you are doing is the right way to work with them - just narrate your day, and read picture books and name everything. As long as they don't have any physical impairment involving muscles, etc....that affect their speech, they should start talking on their own schedule. At the 18 mo appt, your ped can screen them and do a referral to early intervention for testing if he/she feels they are behind. In addition, at any time you have a concern, you can self-refer to early intervention (sometimes called child find).

Children vary in their skills at this age and often lag on some to focus on others. Try not to compare to anyone else individually, just look at the averages and the "warning signs".

HTH

I agree. My daughter is a talking and reading whiz yet she couldn't roll over /get of her back until AFTER she started walking. And believe me I tried. I'd let her lie there or roll her over for her to show her how to do it and while I knew she could, she didn't want to.

I have seen children who DIDN'T talk at all until like 2 years and they are very bright children today.

Still curious what other kids are doing, you know
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Old 04-30-2009, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
10,032 posts, read 11,304,394 times
Reputation: 6047
Quote:
Originally Posted by lisdol View Post
Some kids have different rates of learning communication - expressive communication is only one form and, after a slow start, usually comes in a language explosion sometime between 12-24 mos. Many children who do not have as many words as their peers are doing just fine in the area of receptive communication (which is understanding what is being said to them). My 20 month old does not say many words but we can talk to him or ask him to do something and he understands us. I had a similar experience with my oldest. He was a "late talker" but during the screening process it was determined his receptive language was ahead the average, and once he did have his language explosion, he sped ahead of his peers and developed a large vocabulary and advanced-for-his-age way of speaking.

What you are doing is the right way to work with them - just narrate your day, and read picture books and name everything. As long as they don't have any physical impairment involving muscles, etc....that affect their speech, they should start talking on their own schedule. At the 18 mo appt, your ped can screen them and do a referral to early intervention for testing if he/she feels they are behind. In addition, at any time you have a concern, you can self-refer to early intervention (sometimes called child find).

Children vary in their skills at this age and often lag on some to focus on others. Try not to compare to anyone else individually, just look at the averages and the "warning signs".

HTH
Thanks! I know they understand words like bottle, bath, no... just because they react to them (get excited when I say "bath time", whine if I mention "bottle", etc.)
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